Have questions or want to discuss cycling? Join Now or Sign In to participate in the BikeRide community.

New: Take part in the June Giveaway for a Foldylock Pride bike lock by Seatylock


Help Identifying this Bike Please
#1
Any help is appreciated. Lugwork looks unique, as does the routing of the rear brake cable under top tube and the routing of the derailleur cables over the top of the BB shell. Serial number is included. A friend thinks it is a Schwinn Paramount.
                       
  Reply
#2
(08-30-2020, 09:32 PM)GaryH Wrote:  Any help is appreciated. Lugwork looks unique, as does the routing of the rear brake cable under top tube and the routing of the derailleur cables over the top of the BB shell. Serial number is included. A friend thinks it is a Schwinn Paramount.

Hi Gary,

I'm not sure about the Paramount, mostly due to the "wrap around" style seat stay caps. Other clues may be the type and location of the braze-ons. I would have to have some good photos of other Paramounts to make a determination since I do not have, nor have I ever had a Paramount. I don't have any Nervex lugged frames with that type of seat stay so I can't compare it to my examples. I think my only wrap around stay is of English construction, but I need to check that out and verify it. There are plenty of catalogs available for Schwinn, but they don't give good enough images, in most cases, to help identify a specific frame. Going by the features, I would say it is mid '70s or earlier; but doubt that it is earlier than the '60s.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#3
(08-30-2020, 09:32 PM)GaryH Wrote:  Any help is appreciated. Lugwork looks unique, as does the routing of the rear brake cable under top tube and the routing of the derailleur cables over the top of the BB shell. Serial number is included. A friend thinks it is a Schwinn Paramount.

Hello, @GaryH!
Doug from our BikeRide community shared a comment via Facebook:

"A quality bike with nervex lugs, But definitely not a Schwinn. Look at the seat stays and the top tube cable guides and the braze on cable guides for the derailer Plus the chrome plating is longer than Schwinn used."
  Reply
#4
Hello Jesper & Doug,

Thanks for the input. I have sleuthed some more and am certain it is a 1970/71 Raleigh International. Correct serial number, lug match, cable guides, as well as the wrap around seat stays. Now if I can just get the seat post out! Its going to take a hack saw or chemicals...

Thanks,
Gary
  Reply
#5
(09-01-2020, 10:28 PM)GaryH Wrote:  Hello Jesper & Doug,

Thanks for the input. I have sleuthed some more and am certain it is a 1970/71 Raleigh International. Correct serial number, lug match, cable guides, as well as the wrap around seat stays. Now if I can just get the seat post out! Its going to take a hack saw or chemicals...

Thanks,
Gary

Great! I did check my frames and my Raleigh is the one with wrap seat stays. The fork crown lug and front top tube cable guide/stop also had me thinking that it was not a Schwinn either. Those are very good frames. If you plan on repainting (or not) you may be able to remove the seat post without cutting (possibly saving a nice Campy post?). If you have a heat gun (low heat, or you can also use a hair dryer on high heat), avoiding use of a torch, treat the post/tube with some PB Blaster (or similar penetrant/lube); let sit an hour or 2, then evenly heat the tube at the vicinity of the post, add some more "PB" since the heat will help with capillary action. Once hot, and before it gets a chance to cool down very much, pour ice water over the area until it becomes quite cool. Allow to warm up to ambient temp and try to remove the post (easiest to keep an old expendable saddle clamped on as a "T-handle") via utilizing the saddle frame/rails as an "anvil" to hammer on with a rubber/leather mallet (steel hammer using wood block), and/or the old twist method. I would also "lightly" pry apart, but not too much, the frame post clamp "ears". If you use a torch you may overheat the steel, melt brazing, etc., thus the more mild use of hot air over fire. I thought those were "Carlton" frames and had the "CC" cut outs in the bottom bracket shell so surprised to see a solid BB shell. You might date the frame to within a year or so via the components' date codes (original Camp. cranks and rear derailleur are usually the year of the frame or the year prior to the frame's year of manufacture). Hubs are less accurate due to more frequent replacement of the hub and or locknut which is date coded.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread
Author
Replies
Views
Last Post
 
200
05-31-2021, 12:03 AM
Last Post: Elise
 
5,167
08-31-2014, 11:10 AM
Last Post: daniel1988
 
12,152
08-01-2013, 05:49 PM
Last Post: nfmisso
 
5,424
07-26-2012, 12:55 AM
Last Post: Bill
 
21,201
12-09-2011, 06:17 AM
Last Post: d3v

Forum Jump:

[-]
10 Latest Posts
Road helmet
Today 02:49 PM
How to keep your bicycle safe?
Yesterday 11:58 AM
How often do you use suspension fork loc...
Yesterday 09:53 AM
what is good length for a folding lock?
Yesterday 09:44 AM
Star blubike lube
Yesterday 09:42 AM
It's here! Biking Down a Volcano at 58mp...
Yesterday 09:28 AM
2021 Pro Road Cycling
Yesterday 09:27 AM
Ethical Dilemma
06-18-2021 09:43 PM
Champagnolo Say None of Their Cranksets ...
06-17-2021 08:06 PM
CHANGING 1x8 into 2x8
06-17-2021 01:38 PM

[-]
Top 5 Posters This Month
no avatar 1. ReapThaWhirlwind
46 posts
no avatar 2. Jesper
21 posts
no avatar 3. JoJoJo
11 posts
no avatar 4. Zviedrs
10 posts
no avatar 5. ChaseCal
7 posts