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Removing Crank and Fork
#1
I purchased this bike for $75 and it wasn't riding well so I decided to take it all apart and make it new again. I am having the most difficult time removing the fork and pedal cranks (I think that's what they are called). The top of the fork has a black circular piece that I am sure needs to be unscrewed but it won't budge. I have tried using a pipe strap but it just slips. Using a set of pliers would likely destroy the piece and gauge the metal. The crank pedals are threaded and although I have hit it with a hammer, it doesn't move either. I have sprayed plenty of WD-40 on both parts but that didn't help. There is significant rust. Looking for advice. Also, I plan on repainting this, any advice on how to do that would be helpful as well.


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#2
(02-24-2020, 08:59 PM)NoviceBiker Wrote:  I purchased this bike for $75 and it wasn't riding well so I decided to take it all apart and make it new again. I am having the most difficult time removing the fork and pedal cranks (I think that's what they are called). The top of the fork has a black circular piece that I am sure needs to be unscrewed but it won't budge. I have tried using a pipe strap but it just slips. Using a set of pliers would likely destroy the piece and gauge the metal. The crank pedals are threaded and although I have hit it with a hammer, it doesn't move either. I have sprayed plenty of WD-40 on both parts but that didn't help. There is significant rust. Looking for advice. Also, I plan on repainting this, any advice on how to do that would be helpful as well.



Welcome to Bikeride, sorry that no one has given you any advice regarding your overhaul. I'll try my best to help, but your bike is not what I am intimately familiar with so bear with me regarding specific recommendations for removal/repair. Be advised that anytime you are using "improper" tools you may cause damage to parts so be careful not to "overdo it" if the part is not cooperating. If you plan on doing much work yourself, be it on this bike and/or future rides it would behoove you to get a few tools specific to your needs and/or get to know a decent mechanic at a shop near you who will remove/reinstall parts for you before and after you complete your maintenance. A little cheaper since you don't need to buy all the tools, and you are doing the most time consuming work since removal and reinstallation of most parts is a fairly quick procedure. That leaves you to do final adjustments if required, or you can still have the shop do them while it is there.
Your crank would appear to be an "ashtabular" style one piece crank. This would have the bearing cones threaded onto the actual crank, and if the bearing surfaces are bad (rusty, pitted) you would have to replace the cone(s)(left side has reverse threads). To remove the crank you will need to remove the lock nut and lock washer from the left side (looks like you already have done that); I believe that the threads on this side are reverse/left-hand (same as the threads for the left side pedal), so turning to the right should loosen the threaded parts; a special spanner can be used to engage the slots on the cone for removal/installation, but this cone should unscrew fairly easily (if not rusted on) and an old large flat tip screw driver can be used if necessary to loosen/tighten. The bearing cups are pressed into the BB shell so if needing replacement they would need to be "pressed" out. This can be done with an old screwdriver/metal rod/drift, etc.; hammer out from the opposite side of the cup you are removing, tapping a little all the way around the inside of the BB shell while engaging the "lip" of the cup. It is easy to find new or good used parts since these were common crank styles for those types of bikes for many decades. If bearing surfaces seem okay you can simply clean, and if needed polish the surfaces to provide a little smoother operation. The fork steerer nut may need a "hook" spanner to remove it, but banging with a hammer and an old screwdriver may loosen it up. You can clamp a pipewrench/monkey wrench on it, that might tear it up aesthetically, but it should not damage it in a way that it cannot be reused if removed carefully. Other headset bearing parts may again require "pressing out" for removal if damaged beyond repair. Aside from "prepping" areas with penetrant/lubricant, you can heat treat these same areas in order to cause expansion/contraction of the metals and hopefully break the corrosion "weld" that is preventing removal of those parts. A simple method which shouldn't hurt the paint/plastic is using a hair dryer to heat up (it may not get hot enough) the area in question, or use a torch (will damage paint/plastic due to high heat) on the affected area(s). Heat up (I like to see the lube boil if using a torch) and allow to cool, also this will help the capillary action of the penetrant. Be careful to catch any loose bearings if you are saving them, I use a magnetic parts tray while doing this type of work; but I recommend doing it in an area where small dropped parts can be easily spotted.
Hope that helps a little, I'm not an expert, but I've managed to avoid the repair shops for most of my maintenance over the past 30 years or so. I do belong to a "bike collective" where a membership allows the use of all the shop tools. I pay $50 a year and probably work on at least 6 or more bikes each year, but I still have some base tools at home that I know I'll regularly use (I ride over 12 vintage bikes regularly). My membership also gives me the use of a variety of "loaner" bikes that can be ridden for 24 hours while waiting on a frozen part to free up, or for other delays in repair; not to mention having a "grab bag" of used parts to pick from.

Take care,
Jesper
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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#3
(02-24-2020, 08:59 PM)NoviceBiker Wrote:  I purchased this bike for $75 and it wasn't riding well so I decided to take it all apart and make it new again. I am having the most difficult time removing the fork and pedal cranks (I think that's what they are called). The top of the fork has a black circular piece that I am sure needs to be unscrewed but it won't budge. I have tried using a pipe strap but it just slips. Using a set of pliers would likely destroy the piece and gauge the metal. The crank pedals are threaded and although I have hit it with a hammer, it doesn't move either. I have sprayed plenty of WD-40 on both parts but that didn't help. There is significant rust. Looking for advice. Also, I plan on repainting this, any advice on how to do that would be helpful as well.
Looking at the top of the steerer, if I'm properly understanding you, the black circular piece doesn't need to be undone. The notched locknut needs to be unscrewed so the whole fork can be pulled out. Be careful with how the bearings come out because they must go back the right way, or new ones must go in the right way up or down.

The black, circular piece would be the bearing seat. If that's not rusty inside, then leave it alone. It's best to put new bearings in, top and bottom, and when you put it all back together, don't overtighten that lockring at the top of the steerer, or you'll damage the new bearings and make the steering tight. It can be confusing when you pull it all apart and try putting it back together. Doing your own wrenching is great but if you're not sure about the steerer and bearings, I'd suggest you let a bike mechanic do it.

Repainting? There's only one way to do the job right, and that is to strip the whole bike down to just the frame. You're taking on a big task if you don't have mechanical experience. You could paint it without stripping it down, but the preparation is very important. It would need sanding down with perhaps a 200 grade paper, then painting with primer. Lightly sand that with 400 grade paper. Then apply your finish color. I'm just giving you very basic instruction but it's usually more work than that. You may be disappointed if you don't have painting experience. Some guys take the frame to a body shop and let them do it. Is the bike valuable enough to warrant that?
If I knew how to ride a bike properly, I'd do it every time.
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