Have questions or want to discuss cycling? Join Now or Sign In to participate in the BikeRide community.

New: Take Part in the February Giveaway for a Chance to Win 2x METRO Hybrid Bikes


Chain wear indicators
#1
I recently picked up a Park CC-3.2 to put in my portable bike tool-bag (12 inch ruler won't fit).  With it one of my chains that measures fine with the ruler, fails, even at the .75 side.  Reading on the subject states that the CC-3.2 doesn't take into account roller wear, which the Shimano TL-CN41 does. So, I took a popsicle stick (perfect thickness) and shaped it to press the roller nearest the drop-in end of the Park to give similar results to the Shimano and eliminate roller wear anomalies.  Sure enough, measurements come out differently, and what "failed" previously with the Park, now passes.  My question(s):  Is the Park CC-3.2 cut to compensate for roller wear to a point (meaning longer than it would be if the rollers were both pressed against their links in the same direction, as with the Shimano or my popsicle stick)?  If so, my invention would be inaccurate.  Has anyone measured with calipers (vernier) these two tools to see if they are the same distance at their measuring points?
Thanks for any insights or help.
  Reply
#2
I don't know the technical specs of how these tools work. But I'd say that in general, you shouldn't worry about it too much. Even if you know the exact percentage 'stretch' your chain has, it's really a guess as to what to do with that information. Should you replace a chain at .5% wear or .6%? The debate about whether to adjust for "wear on the rollers" sounds like BS to me. The point is that a worn chain doesn't fit the shape of the teeth on the cogs anymore. I don't think it matters much exactly which part of the chain has the wear.

On newer, high end drive trains, replacing a chain before it stretches too much will prevent you having to constantly replace the cassette as well. They are made out of much less durable materials and are much more sensitive to mixing old and new parts together. On older bikes, you can get away with a lot more stretch before it will impact anything. But there's no magic formula.
  Reply
#3
I think I'll carry the Park tool for initial checks, but then pull out a ruler for the final decision. Old school is the best school sometimes. Had just wondered if anybody had done any tests on the accuracy of the chain wear specific tools out there is all.
  Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread
Author
Replies
Views
Last Post
 
1,836
08-13-2023, 08:17 AM
Last Post: GirishH
 
5,778
12-08-2019, 05:30 AM
Last Post: Joe_W
 
2,723
08-11-2019, 09:25 AM
Last Post: Painkiller
 
6,587
12-10-2017, 02:46 PM
Last Post: garrett01
 
16,530
03-16-2015, 06:58 AM
Last Post: 1FJEF
 
10,353
01-06-2011, 01:08 PM
Last Post: Bill
 
28,573
02-21-2010, 03:03 PM
Last Post: Joe_W
 
8,678
12-21-2009, 06:15 PM
Last Post: Bill
 
10,574
11-17-2009, 05:19 PM
Last Post: krider46

Forum Jump:

[-]
10 Latest Posts
1990 Specialized Rockhopper How to Fluff...
Today 10:24 AM
Chain sits on top of chainring when shif...
Today 07:28 AM
New Wheel Question
Yesterday 11:26 PM
Flat Repair Tools
02-23-2024 11:20 AM
How to keep your bicycle safe?
02-23-2024 11:05 AM
Dent on a new bicycle frame
02-22-2024 11:17 PM
My inexpensive strong 29 inch wheel
02-22-2024 11:01 PM
Modern rims crack at spoke holes
02-22-2024 10:00 PM
Why do spokes break?
02-22-2024 12:10 PM
Staying Active as the Wet, Cold & Darkne...
02-22-2024 11:48 AM

[-]
Join BikeRide on Strava
Feel free to join if you are on Strava: www.strava.com/clubs/bikeridecom

[-]
Top 5 Posters This Month
no avatar 1. GirishH
25 posts
no avatar 2. enkei
21 posts
no avatar 3. ReapThaWhirlwind
17 posts
no avatar 4. Jesper
14 posts
no avatar 5. ichitan
13 posts