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What's the correct spokes for a 26" rim with brake hub?
#1
Hi from Kentucky.

I'm planning to add a front brake hub to my 26" rim but will need to re-lace the wheel. Anyone know what size spokes I should look for? Is it possible to true a rim at home or is that gonna be a shop expense?

Thanks.....Tom
2011softcruise


“Striker, listen, and you listen close: flying a plane is no different than riding a bicycle, just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes.”
Airplane (1980) – Rex Kramer (Robert Stack)

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#2
Spoke length will depend on the hub and rim dimensions and number of spokes in the wheel. There are online spoke calculators if you search or the shop that is getting you the hub may be able to calculate it for you.

If you have some experience truing a wheel, lacing one from scratch is doable. Just assume it will take a little longer than you plan and be patient. But it is one of the more satisfying bike jobs once you get the hang of it.
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#3
After some research I think re-lacing, truing rims/ hubs is better left to a shop. I'm always calculating ways to saving labor cost but this is something thats unavoidable. If I had the proper tools/ set-up to do it right then I would attempt it.

It's just not worth buying items I'll rarely use. Its an intensive process out of my capabilities.

I should focus on components and save money there vs. buying from the shop. I've contacted a few shops (out-of-state due to snotty local shops) and will likely ship the rim for the new hub install.

I'm learning quickly to recognize what is best left to a pro.
2011softcruise


“Striker, listen, and you listen close: flying a plane is no different than riding a bicycle, just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes.”
Airplane (1980) – Rex Kramer (Robert Stack)

  Reply
#4
I suggest that you have the shop quote a rim for you - it may be cheaper than shipping the one you have.....

I constructed my own truing stand from two pieces of aluminum angle, two 3" L brackets, and a 2" wide piece of steel to attach the magnetic base for the dial indicator to. The dial indicator came from Harbor Freight years ago. Not counting the dial indicator and magnetic base; totally out lay less than $20-. It is not as rigid as a professional stand, but with care, I can true the wheels far better than required.

I use Spocalc Express http://www.sheldonbrown.com/rinard/SpocalcExpress.xls for calculating spoke length.

With respect to spokes, I go with Wheelsmith exclusively, see Peter White's reasons:
http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/spokes.asp

As I am a big guy; I use SS14 spokes in front and on the non-drive side at the rear; and DH13 spokes on the drive side at the rear.
Nigel
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#5
Thats a good idea (and suggestion for hvy dty spokes).

I seen a (cut in half) bike at my welding class and wondered about using the solid forks as a trueing vice. Dial indicators are not that expensive.

I would only need to master the spoke tensioning.

I had shipped the rim for the brake hub install (today, $22) but it was also for the tire removal/ replacement (last time I broke the steel belt and pinched the sidewall). I'm sidetracked on my brake interest since finding a disc brake kit for springer forks. The bike shop is considering to install the disc/ disc axle if the conversion product is determined safe (Venice Motor Bikes). If they reject my request I'll still go with a Sturmey-Archer hub.
2011softcruise


“Striker, listen, and you listen close: flying a plane is no different than riding a bicycle, just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes.”
Airplane (1980) – Rex Kramer (Robert Stack)

  Reply
#6
(03-22-2011, 12:39 AM)2011softcruise Wrote:  ........

I seen a (cut in half) bike at my welding class and wondered about using the solid forks as a trueing vice. Dial indicators are not that expensive.

I would only need to master the spoke tensioning.
........

A set of forks works fine for the front, but the rear wheel will not fit in them - OLD (Outside Length Dimension) which is the distance between the outside of the bearing retaining nuts on the hub. For front wheels, typical is 100mm. For rear wheels, depending on application it is 125mm (road bikes from the '80's and older), 130mm (modern road bikes), 135mm (mountain bikes), 145mm (older tandems), 160mm (modern tandems).

There is some good information here on building wheels:
http://miketechinfo.com/new-tech-wheels-tires.htm#wheel%20truing%20stand
http://sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html

and there are many others on the web
Nigel
  Reply
#7
Good point.

I'm glad I hadn't started cutting/ welding on the scrap bikes.

I just hadn't thought about it.
2011softcruise


“Striker, listen, and you listen close: flying a plane is no different than riding a bicycle, just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes.”
Airplane (1980) – Rex Kramer (Robert Stack)

  Reply


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