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bike riding is a fun! isn't it ???
#1
Hello, bike riders!
let's celebrate some good old biking memories.

What is the Best memory you have about bike riding ? it will be very pleasing if you share your experience with us Smile Smile
  Reply
#2
Generally, all my cycling experiences are enjoyable except where crashes or mechanical failures have occurred. I cannot control the weather so in good or bad conditions, weather only added to the challenge and did not detract from the overall experience (except nearly getting frostbite once).

My most recent adventure was 2 days ago riding the paved (there is a parrallel dirt path also for bikes, horses, etc.) Jacksonville-Baldwin Rail Trail at night under a waxing gibbous moon. Quiet and cool conditons perfect for riding. I use no lights or reflectors (I am on my racing bike; none are mounted) and as a youth I toured in the same manner riding at night to make it to the next destination.
Hazards are many and even in the moonlight (70% of the trail is dark from the overhanging tree canopy) it is hard to see them: pebbles, branches, misc. debris, pavement damage, wildlife, etc.
I ride at my normal speed of 16-18mph just like daytime riding.
I personally find it invigorating as well as a bit eerie.
Just a note: the trail is closed between sunset and sunrise so I may be violating some local law, but my taxes pay for its upkeep and I work during daylight so moonlit nights are great way for me to continue a training regimen without having to add extra mileage during weekend rides. Including the photos to add some perspective.

I warn others that if you do this type of riding you are taking a certain added level of risk over regular daytime riding which is risky enough and nightime riding with proper lighting. NEVER DO THIS ON ROADWAYS; plus it is against laws in most States/areas to ride on public roads without lights.
I am not sure that it is any more dangerous than riding in vehicular traffic, but I would rather get hit by, or hit a deer than to have an interaction with a car.

   
   
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#3
(10-07-2022, 02:03 PM)Jesper Wrote:  Generally, all my cycling experiences are enjoyable except where crashes or mechanical failures have occurred. I cannot control the weather so in good or bad conditions, weather only added to the challenge and did not detract from the overall experience (except nearly getting frostbite once).

My most recent adventure was 2 days ago riding the paved (there is a parrallel dirt path also for bikes, horses, etc.) Jacksonville-Baldwin Rail Trail at night under a waxing gibbous moon. Quiet and cool conditons perfect for riding. I use no lights or reflectors (I am on my racing bike; none are mounted) and as a youth I toured in the same manner riding at night to make it to the next destination.
Hazards are many and even in the moonlight (70% of the trail is dark from the overhanging tree canopy) it is hard to see them: pebbles, branches, misc. debris, pavement damage, wildlife, etc.
I ride at my normal speed of 16-18mph just like daytime riding.
I personally find it invigorating as well as a bit eerie.
Just a note: the trail is closed between sunset and sunrise so I may be violating some local law, but my taxes pay for its upkeep and I work during daylight so moonlit nights are great way for me to continue a training regimen without having to add extra mileage during weekend rides. Including the photos to add some perspective.

I warn others that if you do this type of riding you are taking a certain added level of risk over regular daytime riding which is risky enough and nightime riding with proper lighting. NEVER DO THIS ON ROADWAYS; plus it is against laws in most States/areas to ride on public roads without lights.
I am not sure that it is any more dangerous than riding in vehicular traffic, but I would rather get hit by, or hit a deer than to have an interaction with a car.

Hello Jasper,

I enjoyed reading your story and was a little surprised at how adventurous you are,
I can understand your feelings but still I would request you
to be cautious because caution is important. You should also make it mandatory to use
lights or reflectors because any accident can easily happen in the dark of night without lights or reflectors,
and above all you should never break the law. Because breaking the law is also a crime and can
cause many troubles, in the end I will say that cycling is a good hobby but the hobby should not be so intense that you risk your life or someone else's life for it

Take care a lot.
  Reply
#4
Night riding can be thrilling. A long time ago my good friend Pete, and I called ourselves the Ghost Riders and rode our bikes down this long winding dirt road at night without lights. It swept along the local lakeshore, and when a full moon the lake shimmered and we pedaled with extreme joy and excitement. I still ride without lights at night, but it is not very often anymore.
  Reply
#5
Some of my best biking memories:

- careening up and down canyon trails on BMXes with my brother in San Diego in the 70s

- 30 mile charity bike ride with my dad from the Pontiac Silverdome to the Renaissance Center in downtown Detroit. The 'best' memory bit is because we miraculously got through some of the worst parts of Detroit, just outside downtown, when the city was murder capital of the world. Yes, we did hear gunfire nearby, LOL

- cycling club ride outs through the farm country outside my hometown in Canada when I was a kid

- lazy summer rides through the English countryside

- regular rides along the beach here where I live

- exploring on my bike, not worrying about where I'm going or how I'm getting there

- every single time I talk myself into getting on my bike when it's cold, wet or otherwise horrible outside. It's always worth it!
  Reply
#6
For me, biking in Boston during snow storms was always fun. Most of the roads would be deserted and except for the fresh snow not a lot of movement. I would be all layered up and riding through the fresh snow.. truly truly magical and a fun experience..:-)

Recently, riding the TEMBR-dirt road version in Ecuador has been a beautiful, fun experience. I am so smitten by the mountains and the bike culture here I am still in Ecuador after completing TEMBR..:-)


Attached Files Image(s)
   
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#7
I just did another "full" moon night ride. No issues, but again, this was done on a trail without concern of vehicular traffic (motorized or not). I tend to ride faster (20mph) and shorter (10-15 miles) rides to keep up with the shadow/lighting changes, but the ride is much more mentally stimulating than a daylight ride. As usual, do not do this unless you are not overly concerned for your safety (I do ride with helmet and gloves).
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#8
I prefer to ride when the weather is cooler because I don't have to worry about suddenly collapsing from heat stroke on the...
  Reply
#9
How spooky was this "full" moon ride, Jesper?..:-)

Night rides are very stimulating, especially out in the woods or mountains. During one such ride in Ecuador, my riding buddy and I were determined to get to the next village, which meant riding through mountains and trails for about two hours in the dark. My buddy rode a lighter bike and was also about ten years younger. I was slower and lagging. I rode fast through the dark on this mud trail/4x4 road because I am mortally scared of darkness (I carry two headlamps) as I am night-blind. I was scared of getting a flat in the middle of nowhere or getting robbed. This was after we had already spent a night camping and had decided to make it to the next town.

I remember being completely drenched in my sweat as I rode past barking dogs and over countless rocks and obstacles that I would have avoided if it were daylight. I clearly remember how nervously stimulating that evening was. Rewards were watching the sunset in the Andes and interacting with villagers.

https://www.cycleblaze.com/journals/mistergordo/day-8-of-week-3-on-tembr/

Stupidly, I repeated a similar night ride after vowing not to. This was in India, and I needed to reach my destination town as my friends were waiting. I had started early but stops along the way delayed me. During this 90 + miles ride, my body started revolting, and night set in while I was still a couple of hours away. Again, it was very nerve-wracking but rides to remember. :-)

(06-04-2023, 05:25 AM)Jesper Wrote:  I just did another "full" moon night ride. No issues, but again, this was done on a trail without concern of vehicular traffic (motorized or not). I tend to ride faster (20mph) and shorter (10-15 miles) rides to keep up with the shadow/lighting changes, but the ride is much more mentally stimulating than a daylight ride. As usual, do not do this unless you are not overly concerned for your safety (I do ride with helmet and gloves).
  Reply
#10
I finally have something nice to share here, Holloween 2023 went on a ride wearing costumes, I went as Olaf from frozen and my fiancé went as Elsa. Pretty good happy memory for cycling I would say
  Reply
#11
(06-28-2024, 12:14 PM)meamoantonio Wrote:  I finally have something nice to share here, Holloween 2023 went on a ride wearing costumes, I went as Olaf from frozen and my fiancé went as Elsa. Pretty good happy memory for cycling I would say

Any photos to share? I could not ride in my last costume for safety purposes (and a little beer consumption).
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#12
(06-28-2024, 10:40 AM)GirishH Wrote:  How spooky was this "full" moon ride, Jesper?..:-)

Wow, you made me have to think about it because I know it had been awhile. Even though I was doing regular night commutes (6 miles) after leaving the hospital at 1 AM with lights it has been some time since I did a true "night" ride with or without moonlight.
I remember that ride quite well because even with the moon I was riding on a shaded trail. It was scary in more ways than one. First, there are a lot more animals out and about and deer will come out of nowhere and much too late for you to avoid them if there are in front of you. Opossums, racoons, skunks, foxes, coyotes, armadillas; you name it, are all potential hazards. I just ride fearless because there is no use worrying about unseen dangers. If you are concerned then do not do it. Riding without bike lights and essentially no ambient lighting is absolutey insane, but exciting too. I ride much faster with the adrenaline fully kicked in. That night I nearly rode off the trail a couple times as I only had a few short areas off open moonlight to clearly see the path. There were some hash marks marking the center but they were way too far apart and not that bright to provide an accurate means of guidance. It truly was not a full moon either, but a gibbous moon either waning or waxing.

I would commute to work at around 2 AM for a 40 mile ride but even without the moon I could use night vision (my eyes are light sensitve with 20/15 vision) with my headlights off and only turning them on for oncoming traffic in order to preserve my night vision. Those rides are not that scary (or as fun), but still a bit more exciting since you kind of lose your reference in time and space (no shadow, no visual references) just follow the slightly illuminated pavement.

I assume you had some mountain rides at night in the snow. Those are wild when you have a full blanket of snow and moonlight illumnating a glowing terrain. Probably the only thing close to it is moonlight on the beach sand with waves breaking having a phosphorescent glow.

On my longest tour as a young punk I had no lights or reflectors on my bike and like yourself I would ride until reaching the next town which usually meant riding for 150 miles or more in a day and being in the saddle for 12 or more hours. Longest ride was about a metric triple century doing about 30% at night. Nuts when I think about it now, but I could fly on my bike once I dropped the rack bag and backpack to do some exploring the next day in the cities and surrounding areas once daylight started to kick in. I'd be roadkill if I tried to do that type of night riding now with the increase of traffic and speeds that drivers do.

One major problem with night riding is police. I guess they think anyone riding fast on a bike at night is a criminal as I have been followed by police, stopped, and questioned about who I was (needed my ID, no license back then; I was cycling 100% of the time), and where I was going. They kindly escorted me out of town like Rambo in First Blood. "Don't come back now, ya hear!". Another time I was flying home on a very cold night at about 30mph (only a 5 mile ride) with my hoodie over my face. I guess I looked suspicious because I was pulled over at gun point and arrested for armed robbery of a McDonalds a mile from my house. I got tossed into the cruiser and they drove me through the McD's drive through for identification by the clerk. I was active military at the time and they were somewhat embarrassed to find that out after the store clerk "exonerated" me of the burglery. Such is my life! Lesson: ride slow at night, be lit up, do not wear a hoodie; and oh yes, NEVER GIVE AN UNKNOWN CAR CLOSELY TAILING YOU THE FINGER 'CAUSE IT MIGHT BE THE COPS!
You want more "fun" bike stories; I got them.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#13
I once rode on the coastal side about 3 years ago. I reached a viewpoint that overlooked a dramatic cliff with waves crashing against the rocks below. That moment I realized if I start cycling to viewpoints I would be cycling but not just for the sake of cycling itself but rather reaching a view. Something to end my ride, like a prize
  Reply
#14
A "little" beer..:-) ? I had to walk my bike one evening because I was tipsy after a bit of alcohol and didn't want an RUI in Massachusetts...

(06-28-2024, 04:48 PM)Jesper Wrote:  
(06-28-2024, 12:14 PM)meamoantonio Wrote:  I finally have something nice to share here, Holloween 2023 went on a ride wearing costumes, I went as Olaf from frozen and my fiancé went as Elsa. Pretty good happy memory for cycling I would say

Any photos to share? I could not ride in my last costume for safety purposes (and a little beer consumption).

Wow, Jesper, those are some stories..:-) Fortunately, I have not ridden that late and thankfully haven't had any encounters with the police..

(06-29-2024, 12:18 AM)Jesper Wrote:  
(06-28-2024, 10:40 AM)GirishH Wrote:  How spooky was this "full" moon ride, Jesper?..:-)

Wow, you made me have to think about it because I know it had been awhile. Even though I was doing regular night commutes (6 miles) after leaving the hospital at 1 AM with lights it has been some time since I did a true "night" ride with or without moonlight.
I remember that ride quite well because even with the moon I was riding on a shaded trail. It was scary in more ways than one. First, there are a lot more animals out and about and deer will come out of nowhere and much too late for you to avoid them if there are in front of you. Opossums, racoons, skunks, foxes, coyotes, armadillas; you name it, are all potential hazards. I just ride fearless because there is no use worrying about unseen dangers. If you are concerned then do not do it. Riding without bike lights and essentially no ambient lighting is absolutey insane, but exciting too. I ride much faster with the adrenaline fully kicked in. That night I nearly rode off the trail a couple times as I only had a few short areas off open moonlight to clearly see the path. There were some hash marks marking the center but they were way too far apart and not that bright to provide an accurate means of guidance. It truly was not a full moon either, but a gibbous moon either waning or waxing.

I would commute to work at around 2 AM for a 40 mile ride but even without the moon I could use night vision (my eyes are light sensitve with 20/15 vision) with my headlights off and only turning them on for oncoming traffic in order to preserve my night vision. Those rides are not that scary (or as fun), but still a bit more exciting since you kind of lose your reference in time and space (no shadow, no visual references) just follow the slightly illuminated pavement.

I assume you had some mountain rides at night in the snow. Those are wild when you have a full blanket of snow and moonlight illumnating a glowing terrain. Probably the only thing close to it is moonlight on the beach sand with waves breaking having a phosphorescent glow.

On my longest tour as a young punk I had no lights or reflectors on my bike and like yourself I would ride until reaching the next town which usually meant riding for 150 miles or more in a day and being in the saddle for 12 or more hours. Longest ride was about a metric triple century doing about 30% at night. Nuts when I think about it now, but I could fly on my bike once I dropped the rack bag and backpack to do some exploring the next day in the cities and surrounding areas once daylight started to kick in. I'd be roadkill if I tried to do that type of night riding now with the increase of traffic and speeds that drivers do.

One major problem with night riding is police. I guess they think anyone riding fast on a bike at night is a criminal as I have been followed by police, stopped, and questioned about who I was (needed my ID, no license back then; I was cycling 100% of the time), and where I was going. They kindly escorted me out of town like Rambo in First Blood. "Don't come back now, ya hear!". Another time I was flying home on a very cold night at about 30mph (only a 5 mile ride) with my hoodie over my face. I guess I looked suspicious because I was pulled over at gun point and arrested for armed robbery of a McDonalds a mile from my house. I got tossed into the cruiser and they drove me through the McD's drive through for identification by the clerk. I was active military at the time and they were somewhat embarrassed to find that out after the store clerk "exonerated" me of the burglery. Such is my life! Lesson: ride slow at night, be lit up, do not wear a hoodie; and oh yes, NEVER GIVE AN UNKNOWN CAR CLOSELY TAILING YOU THE FINGER 'CAUSE IT MIGHT BE THE COPS!
You want more "fun" bike stories; I got them.
  Reply


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