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Advice on a bike purchase
#1
just looking for a bike I can use on the off running days; I was thinking about this bike, but this guy seems to sell a lot of bikes on craigslist. Can anyone tell me if this is a horrible idea? I know nothing about this bike/brand.

http://cincinnati.craigslist.org/bik/2829240833.html

thanks,
~Brian
~Brian
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#2
Nice clean bike with Shimano components for $60, it aint rocket science. If its your size go for it.
Never Give Up!!!
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#3
Hi Brian;

The bike is a department store bike from the 1980's, that probably cost around $60- new. It is not a collector's item. It is a heavy bike, and the frame is not very strong. If you are just tooling around the neighborhood, it will be fine. If you are planning on commuting 5 or more miles each way every day, you will not be happy with this bike. This is strictly a pave surface bike.

We can give you much better advice if you tell us about yourself, and how you are planning riding it.
Nigel
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#4
(02-02-2012, 01:23 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  Hi Brian;

The bike is a department store bike from the 1980's, that probably cost around $60- new. It is not a collector's item. It is a heavy bike, and the frame is not very strong. If you are just tooling around the neighborhood, it will be fine. If you are planning on commuting 5 or more miles each way every day, you will not be happy with this bike. This is strictly a pave surface bike.

We can give you much better advice if you tell us about yourself, and how you are planning riding it.


Thanks Nigel,
That was more along the kinds of advice I was after. I've never bought a road bike before so I didn't even really know there was a sizing process. A local biker friend of mine told me that bike was way too small for me (I'm 6'4) so it would seem that the search is on. I appreciate the help/advice.

cheers,
~Brian
~Brian
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#5
Yeh you do need to learn about basic bike fit. Suggest visit to local bike store. If you can afford more than $60 you can find a higher quality bicycle.
Never Give Up!!!
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#6
(02-02-2012, 03:59 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  Yeh you do need to learn about basic bike fit. Suggest visit to local bike store. If you can afford more than $60 you can find a higher quality bicycle.

Right on, thanks man. I can afford more, but the store I visited today was telling me entry level road bikes were $1500 plus accessories. It just seemed like overkill for someone of my level. There has to be a medium.

Thanks for the advice.

~Brian
~Brian
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#7
How about this:
cincinnati.craigslist.org/bik/2821539245.html

You will definitely be able to find something decent for a few hundred used. But you do need to learn a little about what's what or look with someone who knows a little so you don't get something completely inappropriate.

Buying new does have advantages of course. But I wouldn't use the shop you went to. "Entry level" road bikes start in the $700 range and they are decent bikes. Of course, a $1500 bike is nicer, but twice as good? no. If the salesman in the shop isn't interested in hearing what your interested in using the bike for and working in your budget, find someone better.

Finally, a brief rant about bike types. If you're getting a bike mainly to exercise on, remember that a "faster" bike means you have to go farther/faster/for longer to get the same workout. Think about getting a more versatile transport oriented bike. You are still allowed just to ride it for fun/exercise. Really. But you may also find it useful for running down to the store to pick up milk which then becomes both useful and exercise. If you know you want a racing style bike to tear around on, don't let me don't let me dissuade you. They're fun. But just put the idea in your head that a bike can be both fun and useful and there really are bikes that do both. <end: rant>
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#8
Ye used to be a lot easier to pick a bike , now they got so many specialized version its getting way out of hand.(road, hybrid, Mountain bike, comfort bike, city bike, cruiser and on and on) As Dave and Nigel suggested you need to decide what you want to do and how much riding you will be doing. Also you did not say anything about sizing at the dealer, you need to know what size bike you need. Probably at 6"4" you may need a 60cm bike depends on leg length . But you should find out.

Bikes are versatile and unless you are a top rider most will get you around, get exercise and have fun.

I have seen people on this list get very nice new bikes in the $500 range, on craigs list you can cut that in half. Do get the best you can afford but do not go crazy with all the dudas, seen many fads come and go.

I recently got a 1985 Fuji del Rey that I restored, its old school and rides great.

Check out this site for info.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/
Never Give Up!!!
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#9
There is some good advice being given here. You should really do some homework before purchasing a bike now-a-days, new or used, as it isn't like it used to be. You could end up throwing away your money, if buying blindly. As mentioned, the most important part of getting any bike, especially a road bike, is fit. If the bike doesn't fit properly, it will be extremely uncomfortable, cause you aches and pains and you will end up not riding it. There are several fitting charts online that will help you come pretty close to what size you should be riding.

If you are looking for new, there are some good deals on entry level road bikes on some of the on-line bike stores. However, there are certain risks when buying from them that you won't encounter when buying from a LBS.

I hope that you find yourself a nice bike that is within your price range and ride it like you stole it.
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Daily
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#10
(02-02-2012, 10:49 AM)brianjgeraghty Wrote:  ...... sizing process. A local biker friend of mine told me that bike was way too small for me (I'm 6'4) .......
Hi Brian;

Two schools - $$$ get measured and fitted for you bike or use your knowledge about your size, and work from there. I am of the latter school.

I am a fraction under six feet, but for frame size, your inseam is the important measurement. I wear trousers with a 32" inseam, and like frames that are 58cm or 23". With both feet flat on the ground, there is sufficient clearance from the top tube to my crotch.

I like to have the saddle positioned so that my legs can almost fully extend on each peddle stroke.

For handle bar positioning: I like flat bars slightly below saddle height, and a comfortable reach, my arms end up somewhere (±20°) around 45° from vertical. The goal is to have about 1/3 of your weight on your feet, one third on your rear and one third on your arms.

My commute is about 12 miles each way, and depending on my choice of route, has some or a lot of traffic. In that environment, I prefer flat bars, with which I have more confidence in braking quickly.

My bikes:
http://forums.bikeride.com/thread-3216.html
http://forums.bikeride.com/thread-3036.html
http://forums.bikeride.com/thread-2920.html
Nigel
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