Have questions or want to discuss cycling? Join Now or Sign In to participate in the BikeRide community.

New: Take part in the September Giveaway for a Spider Rear Rack and a Heavy Duty Drybag from aeroe


Trek 800 mountain bike question
#1
I just picked up a used Trek 800 Mountain bike that a guy pretty much used spare parts to rebuild. The back Rim is bent and I would like to replace the back wheel. I have not been able to find any replacement Trek parts on line such a a wheel/sprocket replacement for the rear wheel. What are my options? Are there parts I can use for this bike?

Please help anyone?
  Reply
#2
Welcome to the Forum,
You said it is bent, like when you spin it you see it bent? Look at Alex's video and tell us if this is the problem....
http://bikeride.com/wheel-truing/
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
  Reply
#3
Yes. The wheel looks good until is hits a spot that looks almost like a zig-zag then you are looking down at it. It is not gradual at all.
  Reply
#4
Does your back wheel have a freewheel or cassette sprocket? If you don't know the difference here are two links to help tell the difference:

Freewheel: http://bikeride.com/replace-freewheel/
Cassette: http://bikeride.com/replace-cassette-cluster/

Also, what type of axle does the rear wheel have? It'll be either nutted or quick release.
  Reply
#5
I am thinking it is a flywheel. I am not sure if the back wheel is the original wheel but it is not quick release.
  Reply
#6
If it's a freewheel, how many gears does it have?
  Reply
#7
If it's a 6 or 7 speed this wheel should work:
http://www.amazon.com/Alex-Steel-Freewheel-Nutted-Black/dp/B000C1927E/

You might not need to replace your freewheel. Just remove it and install it on the new wheel. If you decide to replace the freewheel you should consider replacing the chain as well. Something like these components should do the trick:

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-HG37-7-Speed-14-28-Freewheel/dp/B001G0RMOK/
http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-CN-HG50-8-Speed-Chain-Black/dp/B0013EP4W6/
  Reply
#8
Also note that the rear spacing of the frame is probably 130mm rather than the now standard 135mm for MTBs (downhill bikes and freeriders have yet another frame spacing). If it is a steel frame you can adjust the frame http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html I did this with my old road bike (123mm to 130mm), was not too difficult.
  Reply
#9
What are the specific details that i should look for when considering if it is a flywheel or sprocket? I saw the videos but could not tell the difference really.

Nevermind. I do not think I have a cassette and freewheel. But that is what I want. Can I go to that from the older style? I am a big guy to 350lbs, would your suggested RIM support me?
  Reply
#10
If you are heavier, a "cassette/freehub" wheel is preferable to a "freewheel" wheel because the axle is stronger. The first question is how many speeds your rear shifter has (and if it is a shimano shifter). If you get a wheel that is matched to the number of speeds on the shifter, you shouldn't have any problems getting the gearing to work.
  Reply
#11
If you have 6 speeds in the rear you are stuck with a freewheel, I am (almost) sure that there are no 6 speed cassettes.

Oh, and I forgot to add: if you replace the wheel with one with a longer axle you'll have to have the derailléur hanger adjusted. I always keep forgetting that... This is best done by the local bike shop as they have the appropriate tool for that.
One way around could be a wheel built with a road hub (lower end -> heavier + sturdier).
  Reply
#12
(03-02-2010, 11:13 AM)DaveM Wrote:  If you are heavier, a "cassette/freehub" wheel is preferable to a "freewheel" wheel because the axle is stronger. The first question is how many speeds your rear shifter has (and if it is a shimano shifter). If you get a wheel that is matched to the number of speeds on the shifter, you shouldn't have any problems getting the gearing to work.

I have an 800 trek series that would be good for parts sitting in my garage. The bike looks and rides good, just normal wear and tear. Tony Sowders 626-410-8311
  Reply
#13
p.s. Parts on a bike are not brand-specific, which is why you will have a hard time looking for a "Trek rear wheel" or similar...and as noted above it's not flywheel or sprocket but rather freewheel.or cassette You will have an easier time getting assistance if you first Google "bike part diagram" for terminology.
  Reply


Possibly Related Threads...

Forum Jump:

[-]
10 Latest Posts
frame choices
Today 10:08 AM
Front Derailer fails to shift to the big...
Today 06:12 AM
Raleigh "Trail" bike
Today 05:02 AM
Know about the Hercules?
Today 04:18 AM
Hello from North Carolina
Yesterday 10:06 PM
Pedals: Clip vs. Clipless
Yesterday 07:43 PM
90's Raleigh R600
Yesterday 06:21 PM
Proper way to torque a crank bolt on a s...
Yesterday 03:37 PM
Where are you from and What is your favo...
Yesterday 02:19 PM
Tour de France 2020
Yesterday 12:08 PM

[-]
Top 5 Posters This Month
no avatar 1. Jesper
36 posts
no avatar 2. G_M
14 posts
no avatar 3. Sagan97
10 posts
no avatar 4. Papa Dom
10 posts
no avatar 5. Painkiller
10 posts