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RD Alignment
#1
Hello guys,

I want to spend my weekends learning how to's and DIYs of bike repairing.

I just have this dream of starting a bike shop in the future (may after this pandemic)

Do you guys have tools suggestions to buy? Please let me know.

I just bought RD aligner last week bec my brother's rd tilted.

Thank youuu.
  Reply
#2
(07-10-2020, 02:13 AM)RoadRacer2020 Wrote:  Do you guys have tools suggestions to buy? Please let me know.

That's a tough order to fill. It depends on what you plan to work on; anything and everything, modern road, mtb, etc.
I build and ride bikes from the '30s to about 2000; primarily European road bikes with like components, but also tandem, commuter, and mid-weight sports bikes. Some use common tools, but many use proprietary tools based on different manufacturer's component designs. You would also need a range of basic shop hand tools, some power tools, and bench grinder/buffer, press, etc. Truing stand, bike ( single or dual) work stand, etc.
You can also peruse the Park and Pedro's websites to see the array of bike tools out there. A lot of stuff available new and used on eBay, Craigslist, and other similar sites; as well as on this website and other forum sites in the "market" sections. If you plan on doing a lot of work do not buy cheap tools; they can cause damage to parts and to you! That doesn't mean you have to buy the most expensive either. If you have a bike "collective"/"Co-op" in your vicinity where they allow access to tools for personal use you can get a better idea of what you might need and how well certain tools/brands hold up to the abuse. One easy thing to do is take your own bike and completely strip it of all components, breakdown and rebuild all components; then completely rebuild your bike. This needs to include removing headsets, and other pressed on parts; and also breaking down a wheel into hub/spokes/rim components and rebuilding the wheels. That will give you a real good idea on what you'll need, and that's Just your specific bike. Next do a different style; pick up a a bike on the roadside, pawn shop, friend (or maybe enemy!), etc., and do the same thing you did with your bike; and then again with another style frame: preferably on bikes over a range of manufacturing years. You'll start to realize fairly quickly that you'll need various tools doing the same service, but which are significantly different and whose uses are not interchangeable. I for instance would work on Italian race bikes from 1950-1990, essentially having most tools to do that work, plus the experience. I just bought a truing stand, before I did that work on the frame itself.

Good luck,
Jesper
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#3
(07-10-2020, 03:50 PM)Jesper Wrote:  
(07-10-2020, 02:13 AM)RoadRacer2020 Wrote:  Do you guys have tools suggestions to buy? Please let me know.

That's a tough order to fill. It depends on what you plan to work on; anything and everything, modern road, mtb, etc.
I build and ride bikes from the '30s to about 2000; primarily European road bikes with like components, but also tandem, commuter, and mid-weight sports bikes. Some use common tools, but many use proprietary tools based on different manufacturer's component designs. You would also need a range of basic shop hand tools, some power tools, and bench grinder/buffer, press, etc. Truing stand, bike ( single or dual) work stand, etc.
You can also peruse the Park and Pedro's websites to see the array of bike tools out there. A lot of stuff available new and used on eBay, Craigslist, and other similar sites; as well as on this website and other forum sites in the "market" sections. If you plan on doing a lot of work do not buy cheap tools; they can cause damage to parts and to you! That doesn't mean you have to buy the most expensive either. If you have a bike "collective"/"Co-op" in your vicinity where they allow access to tools for personal use you can get a better idea of what you might need and how well certain tools/brands hold up to the abuse. One easy thing to do is take your own bike and completely strip it of all components, breakdown and rebuild all components; then completely rebuild your bike. This needs to include removing headsets, and other pressed on parts; and also breaking down a wheel into hub/spokes/rim components and rebuilding the wheels. That will give you a real good idea on what you'll need, and that's Just your specific bike. Next do a different style; pick up a a bike on the roadside, pawn shop, friend (or maybe enemy!), etc., and do the same thing you did with your bike; and then again with another style frame: preferably on bikes over a range of manufacturing years. You'll start to realize fairly quickly that you'll need various tools doing the same service, but which are significantly different and whose uses are not interchangeable. I for instance would work on Italian race bikes from 1950-1990, essentially having most tools to do that work, plus the experience. I just bought a truing stand, before I did that work on the frame itself.

Good luck,
Jesper

Hi Jesper,

Thank you so much for sharing your experience. I'm challenged and moved on your story. Well I hope someday I can be a pro mechanic like you, fueled with lots of experiences and great tools. Again, thank you!
  Reply
#4
[quote='RoadRacer2020' pid='39170' dateline='1594653299

Hi Jesper,

Thank you so much for sharing your experience. I'm challenged and moved on your story. Well I hope someday I can be a pro mechanic like you, fueled with lots of experiences and great tools. Again, thank you!
[/quote]

Thanks, if only I was a "pro"; I learn something new everyday regarding bike maintenance. The technology has changed a lot over the last 20 years or so. Plus, I'm just getting my feet wet when it comes to building a wheel from scratch. I have 4 new wheelsets to build;2 wooden, and 2 alloy. I'm starting with a "dummy" rim and hub to get an idea of what I need to do. I do highly recommend that you buy some basic tools for working on your wheel hubs and bottom bracket assembly, chain removal tool (if no "master" link), etc.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply


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