Have questions or want to discuss cycling? Join Now or Sign In to participate in the BikeRide community.

New: Take part in the July Giveaway for VTUVIA SN100 Camouflage Fat Tire E-Bike $1679


Costco Bikes
#1
Me and wife recently decided to get in to riding bikes and we have been looking for bikes but our budget around $200 each we can stretch a little further if need be. When we are at costco today we saw 2 bikes that they don’t sell online and for that reason I have not been able to find any reviews on it. They are called Boss.three the womens is a comfort bike and the mens is a hybrid...

Originally bought my wife a huffy beach cruiser from walmart for $80 bucks that isn’t that great and either the rim or fender on that is bent and it seems to have a hard time stopping properly.

Sorry if someone else has asked about these already. Couldn’t figure out how to search the forum from my phone.
  Reply
#2
(04-17-2020, 03:49 AM)GeoEng Wrote:  Me and wife recently decided to get in to riding bikes and we have been looking for bikes but our budget around $200 each we can stretch a little further if need be. When we are at costco today we saw 2 bikes that they don’t sell online and for that reason I have not been able to find any reviews on it. They are called Boss.three the womens is a comfort bike and the mens is a hybrid...

Originally bought my wife a huffy beach cruiser from walmart for $80 bucks that isn’t that great and either the rim or fender on that is bent and it seems to have a hard time stopping properly.

Sorry if someone else has asked about these already. Couldn’t figure out how to search the forum from my phone.

I am not familiar with these bikes, but I did read a couple of reviews about Infinity Boss bikes which were overall positive; of course to be taken with a "grain of salt" since I don't know on what level the users were commenting from: serious cyclist or novice.

Two general comments about buying bikes from large retailers:
1) lf you can't take a test ride (more than once around the block is not sufficient to get the feel of it, braking and shifting- all gears, butt and back comfort), then there would be no reference as to your personal fit and riding comfort. I consider these two of the most important factors for overall enjoyment of a bike regardless of type, quality, or price. You can purchase a bike over a $1000, but still be displeased with the ride if it's not comfortable for your riding style and purposes. Most bikes can be used for various purposes, but try to get one that is going to provide the right features for the majority of riding you will do (racing, touring, commuting, shopping, etc.) and, expected average distances and terrains/surfaces, etc that you will be riding on. Also, frequency of use since that would affect the required maintenance to keep them in a safe and more problem free condition. Simple bikes (no suspension, gears, etc.) are both easier to maintain, and have less performance issues in general, given the bike is of fairly decent quality.
2) Assembly and adjustment of ANY bike must be done correctly! The best bike in the world can be a "death machine" if either of these are not taken into consideration. Thus, test riding a bike that is improperly put together and set up may not give a good indication as to comfort and/or performance. If you know someone experienced with bicycle maintenance (could be yourself, I don't know) I would have them go through it top to bottom checking components and hardware for proper installation/operation BEFORE taking on a test ride. An actual bike shop would certainly do this for a nominal fee (if over $50, I defer to a different shop since this can be done in about 30 minutes or less by those experienced, unless doing a complete assembly- more time, more$) if you didn't buy it from them. I would hope there is a return policy for full refund if you find that the design, quality, and/or comfort does not meet your needs; this allows for a decent amount of riding to determine these factors without getting stuck with something you can't or won't use in the end.
A good bike should be a joy to ride for its intended purpose. I see too many people unsatisfied by those factors previously mentioned who are out hundreds to thousands of dollars for a bike they won't use, have to store, and/or end up trying to sell (often ridden only once or twice) for substantially less than it's worth.
Hope l have been able to provide some useful information to you so as to provide you with a good baseline to start at.
I have over 40 years of riding and maintenance experience to draw upon and even I have had a bike that I purchased and didn't ride; specifically, the wrong fit for my body size and riding style. Luckily, since I purchased it used at a very good price, I did out lose out when selling it.
Quick note about used bikes while still taking into consideration all of the aforementioned points: there are some great high quality bikes for sale online (Craigslist, et al.), at local bike shops, and even thrift and pawn shops. I stay away from ebay (overall pricing, plus shipping). Just be careful and use due diligence as if buying a new bike.
This site, and other forum sites are good resources for used (newest bikes often aren't posted yet) bike reviews and insight from those who have, or had them already.

Take care,
Jesper
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#3
(04-17-2020, 03:49 AM)GeoEng Wrote:  Me and wife recently decided to get in to riding bikes and we have been looking for bikes but our budget around $200 each we can stretch a little further if need be. When we are at costco today we saw 2 bikes that they don’t sell online and for that reason I have not been able to find any reviews on it. They are called Boss.three the womens is a comfort bike and the mens is a hybrid...

I can't advise you on those bikes but I would suggest, if you can work with tools, to learn bicycle repairs and start to do your own work. There are plenty of online videos to help you.

I bought a $199 Schwinn 3rd Avenue hybrid, knowing that it would probably need some adjustments. Out of the box it needed two new tires and new tubes. So that pushed my total price up to around $260. I also had to true the front wheel, yet this bike came with great reviews on Amazon, most likely from shills. Fortunately, I am pretty handy with tools, and gradually built up my collection of bike tools. There's a lot of satisfaction in doing your own work on a bike, not to mention saving money and time in not having to take it to the bike shop. Whatever bike you get, even if it was expensive, it's going to need maintenance at some point.

I note that the Boss Three is a 700C hybrid 7 speed. The 700C is wheel size. My Schwinn was a 700C but it had 21 speeds. That's not necessarily a good thing. It means having a triple chain ring with a front derailleur. It came loose miles from home; the clamp bolt was soft metal, and couldn't be tightened, so I had to ride home with the chain rubbing on the derailleur cage. Then I found that the large chain ring had three consecutive teeth that were just nubs, and the chain used to crunch over them. so I had to replace that. This is why I suggest you become familiar with the mechanical attributes of a bike.

Quote:Originally bought my wife a huffy beach cruiser from walmart for $80 bucks that isn’t that great and either the rim or fender on that is bent and it seems to have a hard time stopping properly.

Those Huffys usually have a coaster brake so that you have to pedal backward to stop the bike. That can take a bit of getting used to, and I don't like them at all. My wife had one, didn't like it because of the brake, so she gave it to a friend. Another problem that could arise with the coaster brake (although it's unlikely) is that if the chain broke or came off the chain ring or the freewheel, you've got no brakes at all. Your wife will do much better with her comfort bike, in my opinion.

[/quote]
If I knew how to ride a bike properly, I'd do it every time.
  Reply
#4
Hello, Just saw your post. If it is a matter of budget consider:
If the Costco bike breaks, where will you get parts?
Will you work on the bike?
Most bike shops will work on ay bike but they will not be able to get the parts for 'big store' bikes, if something breaks you will have a broken bike.
Most 'big store' bikes are heavy and are designed for a real beginner and someone who will not ride often.
I would encourage you to visit your local 'real' bike shop and check their used bikes or entry level bikes. You should be able to buy something in the $300-$400 range..look for last year's models or bikes on sale. They will service what they sell and the bike will be properly set up.
You will most likely end up saving money overall.
  Reply
#5
Costco has killer lifetime return policy and extra warranty. They do their due diligence when vetting manufacturers quality standards.
If I find a good bike there at the very least I know I can return it at any time if it did break. Whether they still carry it (to get a like replacement) is another story. Many of these items are seasonal.
  Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread
Author
Replies
Views
Last Post

Forum Jump:

[-]
10 Latest Posts
Cycling photos while on holiday
Today 01:17 PM
Rode my First Double Century in June
Today 01:10 PM
Vairas vintage bicycle brand
Today 11:45 AM
New user
Today 11:38 AM
Lock ring clearance
Yesterday 09:42 PM
New Stator For My Ride1up Core 5
Yesterday 03:56 PM
2022 road cycling season
Yesterday 03:45 PM
Harvest Rush Gravel Grinder! $1,000 cash...
Yesterday 03:38 PM
Why should I buy an e-bike?
Yesterday 02:07 PM
Need Help identifying a Beach Cruiser
08-06-2022 07:40 PM

[-]
Join BikeRide on Strava
Feel free to join if you are on Strava: www.strava.com/clubs/bikeridecom

[-]
Top 5 Posters This Month
no avatar 1. Jesper
21 posts
no avatar 2. ichitan
19 posts
no avatar 3. ReapThaWhirlwind
18 posts
no avatar 4. JamesKim
11 posts
no avatar 5. dinh thaihoang
6 posts