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Dirty rear wheel
#1
I have two bikes on which I service the chains every 100 miles. I've noticed that the rear wheel on both bikes gets dirty while the front wheel stays clean. I'd guess that there must be a scientific explanation for this phenomenon. I use Rock n' Roll chain lube which feels slightly waxy when it's dry, so it's not caused by lube dripping from the chain. I only ride on dry pavement. It's not a big deal, just curious about it.
If I knew how to ride a bike properly, I'd do it every time.
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#2
(11-28-2019, 01:54 PM)CharleyFarley Wrote:  I have two bikes on which I service the chains every 100 miles. I've noticed that the rear wheel on both bikes gets dirty while the front wheel stays clean. I'd guess that there must be a scientific explanation for this phenomenon. I use Rock n' Roll chain lube which feels slightly waxy when it's dry, so it's not caused by lube dripping from the chain. I only ride on dry pavement. It's not a big deal, just curious about it.

interesting topic, charleyfarley. i will list my initial thoughts. first of all, chains in general are dirt magnets so to speak, and it can be observed by looking closer at chain stays, inner side next to wheel & spokes. i'm sure that you have that in mind already. front wheel also has its blame to this. just like with splashing mud, it probably throws some dirt backwards or to the back. third factor is the weight distribution, there is more weight on the rear wheel, potentially more friction etc. those are my first comments, i will think more about it.
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#3
Wink 
(12-01-2019, 01:42 PM)Papa Dom Wrote:  interesting topic, charleyfarley. i will list my initial thoughts. first of all, chains in general are dirt magnets so to speak, and it can be observed by looking closer at chain stays, inner side next to wheel & spokes. i'm sure that you have that in mind already. front wheel also has its blame to this. just like with splashing mud, it probably throws some dirt backwards or to the back. third factor is the weight distribution, there is more weight on the rear wheel, potentially more friction etc. those are my first comments, i will think more about it.
I think the front wheel may be responsible for some of it. I note that the BB shell and a few inches of the down tube tend to get dirty. Nothing on the chain stays that would match what's on the wheel. I have regular fenders on the hybrid, and Dave's Mud Shovels on the fat bike. The rear mud shovel is a few inches above the wheel and doesn't wrap around the wheel, whereas the hybrid fender is close. Perhaps that traps dust.

I may design little brushes that can be clamped to the frames and constantly clean the wheels. Smile
If I knew how to ride a bike properly, I'd do it every time.
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