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Near future road bike purchase
#1
I'm thinking of getting a road bike folks. I already have a decent mountain bike but it just can't do what I want it to on the road. I'll be riding mostly fast sprints throughout the week due to work but around 20-100 miles (a large range I know) when possible on the weekends. The main problem I have is I know nothing about road bikes. Another problem? I'd like to spend less than a grand if possible. Any good ideas?
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#2
Ye I know what you mean. I have been riding my Schwinn MT Bike for a while. Recently I got a 1985 Fuji del Rey that I restored. It rides great big difference between it and the Mt. Bike.
Lots of nice bikes in your price range. Look for the best frame. IMO new Fuji bikes are very nice. If you can find some not made in China that's even better. Butted steel frames are good ride well and durable. Taiwan is good, of course there is Italy but big bucks. Do not think anyone still builds in Japan but when they did in the late 70-80's some great bikes were made.
Make sure you know what size you need. Look for a local dealer with a good follow up reputation, do not get buried in ciackas.

BTW Butted means the frames have different thicknesses in the tube walls to put strength where needed and to keep it light.
Never Give Up!!!
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#3
Is there a brand out there that I should stay away from in your opinion?
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#4
Its a big wide world out there, too big for generalization. Do you have anything specific in mind.

Ye do not go to walmart..
Never Give Up!!!
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#5
Ha, I hear you. No Wal-Marts or Targets. I'm really just looking for a pretty fast ride. It definitely doesn't have to be top of the line since I'm doing it for recreation. I guess I'm pretty much just going for the polar opposite of my mountain bike. A change of pace literally.
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#6
If you can do your own servicing and adjustments, and know what size you want; take a look at Nashbar and BikesDirect if you want new; if not stick with your local bike stores.

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/gran_turismo.htm
http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_522412_-1_10000__203037

Finding a new bike not made in China for under $1K is pretty hard nowadays.

I am a fan of steel, specifically Chrome-Moly alloy steel bike frames. Much smoother ride than "high tensile" steel (C1020 and similar).

As George alluded to, there are some great CL/e-bay opportunities for older bikes that can be rebuilt into truely great rides.

Touring bikes have longer chain stays, more "relaxed" geometry, space for fenders and rack mounts.

Road bikes are shorter, livelier, and often do not have enough clearance for fenders.

Avoid disc brakes on road bikes, the add wieght, with no improvement in normal braking performance wet or dry. Discs are great in the mud and when you have a heavy load going down a mountain.

Generally aluminum frames are harsher riding than steel or titanium. Carbon frames are more dependent on the frame builder's skill than the metal frames - so generalizations do not apply.
Nigel
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#7
Cannot go wrong with either of these bikes. Now you have a standard to compare to, and some bargaining chips if you buy locally. Maybe get some equipment to offset price.
10-4 to 4130 cro-mo butted steel frames. Nower days weight of bike is a missing spec. Lots of the fancy looking bikes are heavy. IMO look for a bike in the 20-25 lbs range. The Shimano 105 set up is nice, but others work fine too. Look for SS spokes.
If you are big a touring bike would be more comfortable.

FYI my 1985 Fuji Del Rey weights 24 lbs naked and 27 with equipment. Its a great riding bike very lively. I am about to take a ride on the LA Beach bike path along the ocean, lovely and sunny about 75 degrees. Lots of hard body eye candy. :-)))
Never Give Up!!!
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#8
(07-29-2012, 12:47 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  If you can do your own servicing and adjustments, and know what size you want; take a look at Nashbar and BikesDirect if you want new; if not stick with your local bike stores.

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/gran_turismo.htm
http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_522412_-1_10000__203037

Finding a new bike not made in China for under $1K is pretty hard nowadays.

I am a fan of steel, specifically Chrome-Moly alloy steel bike frames. Much smoother ride than "high tensile" steel (C1020 and similar).

As George alluded to, there are some great CL/e-bay opportunities for older bikes that can be rebuilt into truely great rides.

Touring bikes have longer chain stays, more "relaxed" geometry, space for fenders and rack mounts.

Road bikes are shorter, livelier, and often do not have enough clearance for fenders.

Avoid disc brakes on road bikes, the add wieght, with no improvement in normal braking performance wet or dry. Discs are great in the mud and when you have a heavy load going down a mountain.

Generally aluminum frames are harsher riding than steel or titanium. Carbon frames are more dependent on the frame builder's skill than the metal frames - so generalizations do not apply.

Can't disagree with most of your comment. I said goodbye to alum and carbon frames some years ago and if I didn't already have too many vintage steel bikes I would simplify and get:

Masi Strada

http://www.masibikes.com/bikes/steel/strada-2012#

It's within the OP's price point and would give a faithful though not tres chic, pricey, road bike experience for years if properly fitted and maintained.

For me, I'd like to just buy the frame and build and improve. But I guess one can't do that.
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#9
(07-29-2012, 05:08 PM)Tim M Wrote:  Can't disagree with most of your comment. I said goodbye to alum and carbon frames some years ago and if I didn't already have too many vintage steel bikes I would simplify and get:

Masi Strada

http://www.masibikes.com/bikes/steel/strada-2012#

It's within the OP's price point and would give a faithful though not tres chic, pricey, road bike experience for years if properly fitted and maintained.

For me, I'd like to just buy the frame and build and improve. But I guess one can't do that.

Tim; very nice road bike - geometry looks close to my 310; and like the 310, no fender clearance. Smile
Nigel
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#10
Dont need no stinkinn fenders. Always sunny in S . Cal...:-)))
Strada looks good, down tube shifters, ye old school.
AS for buying a frame and rolling your own PK just did tha,t but way not under $1K.........
Never Give Up!!!
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#11
Yep, thats the pro's and con's of living with what you buy off the shelf so to speak or creating what you really want. Buy factory at a great price and change the right things at the right price and you can get close. plus its fun to play around
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#12
I appreciate the advice. I'll probably order and put said bike together. I do like the idea of buying a frame and customizing from the ground up but I think I'd end up way out of my current price range.
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#13
(07-29-2012, 09:44 PM)Harrison Wrote:  I appreciate the advice. I'll probably order and put said bike together. I do like the idea of buying a frame and customizing from the ground up but I think I'd end up way out of my current price range.

yea for sure, if the frame did not get you, the groupo or the wheelset will
just have fun with it
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#14
Exactly.
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#15
Though not a true blue roadie here (not knocking anyone either Wink ), I love the Chro Moly frames! They are just as light as some Carbon Fiber "Breakfast bar bikes". Not a big fan of Carbon Fiber bikes but that is my own personal opinion/problem lol.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#16
I understand what you're saying. I've only had experience on trail bikes myself. I've rode a trail "modified" to road bike but it still wasn't the same, you know. I'm not giving up on trails, I just want to be able to hit the road with a little more speed.
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#17
Listen to the guys above they'll put you in the right direction Wink Smile
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#18
I personally like the smoother ride of my old road bike (lugged steel, mid / end 70s French? Has been repainted and up-/sidegraded by many before me, so no way to tell). However I feel the frame is very soft. When looking down you can see how it get twisted when pedaling hard (and you hear the rim hitting the brakes when sprinting).
I also have a "modern" aluminum bike. It is an entry level road bike (nothing fancy, complete 105, Mavik Aksium wheels). It is more responsive than the old one (and slightly lighter). However, the frame is too stiff (well, not as comfortable, probably large part of it is the fork).

For the money you want to spend the bike posted above looks like an ok deal. You could also try to find a used road bike somewhere, STIs are a nice invention (though stay away form anything lower than Shimano Tiagra, it is... carpy (I tried without knowing anything about hierarchy!)). Be prepared to replace some stuff: brake pads, chain, cassette, probably cables or upgrade the above bike later to STIs, there's usually some good deals on last year's (or before) groupsets.

Oh, and in contrast to the rest: I would like to have a real road bike. That (usually) means today: Carbon frame (though some companies have very high quality light and stiff aluminum frames). But stay away from the less expensive frames, they use carbon fibers as black aluminum which is bad engineering. Oh, and it also means spending the GDP of a small developing nation... so I don't buy one. Or maybe a titanium frame, that would also be nice (as those will probably last longer than the carbon frames).
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