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Converting to single speed
#1
can anyone tell me how to turn this into a single speed? I have attached a photo.
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#2
They have kits online that you can buy that include spacers and one gear that you buy and slide on. Normally don't cost that much.
http://www.amazon.com/Origin8-Single-Speed-Conversion-Kit/dp/B002UZFU7G/
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#3
Wot he said.

The DMR one is a favourite of quite a few people I know.

You may have heard arguments for half-link singlespeed chains, but you don't really need one of these. A regular 8-speed chain will be fine (I find half-links aren't actually that strong anyway).
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#4
maybe this link will help:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Single-Speed-on-the-Cheap/
GO RIDE...
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#5
(12-17-2010, 04:31 AM)nameused Wrote:  They have kits online that you can buy that include spacers and one gear that you buy and slide on. Normally don't cost that much.
http://www.amazon.com/Origin8-Single-Speed-Conversion-Kit/dp/B002UZFU7G/

is this how it should look? For some reason the lockring is protruding a little. thanks for the help.
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#6
(12-17-2010, 06:27 PM)eorta7 Wrote:  
(12-17-2010, 04:31 AM)nameused Wrote:  They have kits online that you can buy that include spacers and one gear that you buy and slide on. Normally don't cost that much.
http://www.amazon.com/Origin8-Single-Speed-Conversion-Kit/dp/B002UZFU7G/

is this how it should look? For some reason the lockring is protruding a little. thanks for the help.

Most of the time when I see them the gear is in the middle of all the spacers. One key with single speeds is to make sure the chain line is as straight as possible. So set it up where the front gear that you are using and the rear gear are as close as possible to a straight line to each other.
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#7
yes ^^^ exactly.
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
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#8
(12-17-2010, 09:06 PM)RobAR Wrote:  yes ^^^ exactly.

so I have it done properly? should the lockring be protruding a little like it is in the photo. what would i do differently to make it a fixed?
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#9
If the lockring snugged down well and nothing is loose, you should have it on right. Not quite sure what you mean by "protruding". The lockring should be snug up against what the outermost part is (spacer or cog).

To go fixed, you need a different wheel/hub. I've heard of people welding or gluing cassette hubs to make them fixed, but kind of a funky kludge. Also note that if you have vertical drop outs on the bike, it can be a little tricky to go fixed anyway because it is tough to get proper chain tension. You can't use a tensioner with fixed.
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