Have questions or want to discuss cycling? Join Now or Sign In to participate in the BikeRide community.

New: Take part in the May Giveaway for DERUIZ LAVA e-bike worth $1699


Building a Fixie
#1
On my rides I notice that bare bones fixies are getting popular .

I was wondering ,is there anyway to convert a freewheel or a , freehub cassette wheel into a one gear non free spinning wheel.

Not that I want to do that right now , but for future info.

I like heaving gears and brakes. :-))
Never Give Up!!!
  Reply
#2
You can make a freewheel hub a fix by putting a fixed cog onto it and then use the lockring from an old style 3 piece bottom bracket. However, fixes like this should not really be ridden without hand brakes. Because the lockring goes on with standard threads (instead of reverse), there is a risk of the cog and lockring unscrewing when you try to backpedal/brake with your feet. Some people locktite the whole thing to make it more solid, but this isn't ideal for a variety of reasons. Note that you often also have to respace the axle and redish the wheel.

I don't know any way to "fix" a freehub other than filling it with glue, welding, etc.
  Reply
#3
So in your experience the only thing to do is get a fixie wheel?? No one makes conversion kits?
Never Give Up!!!
  Reply
#4
GeorgeET: Sheldon Brown's site has a lengthy article on how to do it: http://sheldonbrown.com/deakins/how-to-fixed-conversion.html

Honestly, with how complex it looks, I would almost just get a new wheel.
  Reply
#5
It's usually pretty straightforward. I just wouldn't ride a fix without handbrakes on a bike that didn't have a true fixed gear hub on it. Without a proper (reverse thread) lockring, there's always a chance that the cog could unthread just as you're using to slow down. That said, for riding in the city, I wouldn't ride a fix without hand brakes anyway. Even if you are very good at stopping with the wheel, it is still, at best, the equivalent of having a rear brake only which mean you have very poor brakes. I know lots of people who do it. But they all have stories of sliding into stuff because they couldn't stop in time. I ride a fix with just a front brake and it's fun and safe.
  Reply
#6
Ye 10-4 to buzz and DaveM

I too would like the best of both worlds hand brakes and a free spinning wheel for coasting.

Anyway I like my gears.

Here is a 85 Fuji I picked yp and spent twice its price to set it up. Now I have a custom bike. Waiting for a Nashbar TFX seat. This one looks nice but kicks my ass. :-))
Never Give Up!!!
  Reply
#7
Thanks for the link to Sheldons infoBuzz , like always lots of good info and nice fixie and singlespeed (can coast)wheels.
Never Give Up!!!
  Reply
#8
I have to second what Dave says about the front brake. I see a lot of people riding around here sans brake and really just shake my head. Not only does it seem like a bad idea, you can get ticketed here for not having one. Check CA laws, it may be similar.
  Reply
#9
Fixie riding is certainly growing, a local company to me makes a very nice range of fixie wheels using Novatec hubs and coloured rims. I also see that Affix have come up with a convertible hub that can be changed from fixed to free without turning the wheel over, ie, no need for a flip flop; http://www.affix-system.com/3_products_8_4.htm.
and sturmey archer have geared fixed hubs; http://www.sturmey-archer.com/products/hubs/cid/3/id/47
but I still wouldn't ride one myself, tried it once and never again, thank you.
And if you do change, remember the OLD may be different.(over locknut dimension)
  Reply
#10
I'm against creating fixies or anything that destroys the original design. But I suppose you could always weld the gear to the axle, not that I have tried mind you. Smile

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
  Reply
#11
Sheldon Brown site gave great info, and ye getting a proper wheel is the best way to go IMO.

Although freewheel conversion would work and I like keeping a coasting wheel with hand brakes.

Fixie could be a killer downhill. :-))

BTW that frame you are welding is way to heavy for a bike. As per welding sprocket to hub be though considering the different alloys involved.
Never Give Up!!!
  Reply
#12
(07-07-2010, 01:30 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  . . . BTW that frame you are welding is way to heavy for a bike. As per welding sprocket to hub be though considering the different alloys involved.

He-he, yeah that was just my poor attempt at humor. Smile

The photo above is the beginning of my welding table, now completed (below). At 200lbs dry-weight, I needed a stiff frame.

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
  Reply
#13
Nice welding set up. Hope you are not using any asbestos. I have been using a modern product called rafasil to cover hot parts and protect items from splatter. Great to cover my Motorcycle headers when doing tune up. Do not ask how I know. :-))

Do you have oxy acetelyne and MIG set up too?
Never Give Up!!!
  Reply
#14
(07-08-2010, 01:31 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  Nice welding set up. Hope you are not using any asbestos. I have been using a modern product called rafasil to cover hot parts and protect items from splatter. Great to cover my Motorcycle headers when doing tune up. Do not ask how I know. :-))

Do you have oxy acetelyne and MIG set up too?

Thanks Big Grin I haven't been using asbestos at all, thanks for the tip. About 2 years ago I wanted a Miller 180 MIG but decided on a Miller Thunderbolt XL ac-dc when the salesman offered it new for $470. The MIG 180 is almost twice that plus gas. Now I am wishing I had the MIG because I intend to weld more auto body sheet metal (22ga). But am saving money for a new one someday. Might go with the Hobart 187 because "they" say it is the same as Miller's 180 for less money. I decided against O/A because of higher household insurance premiums (explosion, fire etc).

I have a motorcycle too. It's a 1980 Honda CB 750cc Custom. I haven't started it since the mid-1990s so I need to work on it. Smile

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
  Reply
#15
Ye well here are my other bikes. :-)))
Never Give Up!!!
  Reply
#16
What make/model are they? And what welding equipment do you have?

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
  Reply
#17
Red is 91 BMW K75S, black is 82 BMW R100RT.

No personal welding equipment. The shop had lots, that was a quite a while back.
Never Give Up!!!
  Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread
Author
Replies
Views
Last Post
 
2,904
12-12-2019, 09:17 AM
Last Post: wwwalterrr
 
13,333
11-07-2014, 09:52 PM
Last Post: !TREK4ME!
 
5,693
06-10-2014, 02:13 AM
Last Post: 1FJEF
 
16,573
09-20-2013, 05:07 AM
Last Post: MorganIRL
 
5,202
04-11-2012, 09:06 PM
Last Post: capner2112

Forum Jump:

[-]
10 Latest Posts
Posting images
Yesterday 05:34 PM
Entry level triathlon bike recs?
Yesterday 12:39 AM
What are your thoughts on E-bikes?
05-20-2022 08:35 PM
How much do you bike a year
05-20-2022 06:55 AM
Please help me identify my '80's Bridges...
05-19-2022 11:27 PM
Installed Shimano Zee on GT Transeo 5.0
05-18-2022 07:57 PM
E-Bike
05-18-2022 02:50 AM
Unknown brand, should I buy or not?
05-18-2022 02:01 AM
Trek 2300 Vs Triban RC500 (Buy advice)
05-18-2022 01:52 AM
Help with a wheel please !
05-17-2022 08:08 PM

[-]
Join BikeRide on Strava
Feel free to join if you are on Strava: www.strava.com/clubs/bikeridecom

[-]
Top 5 Posters This Month
no avatar 1. Jesper
27 posts
no avatar 2. ReapThaWhirlwind
22 posts
no avatar 3. tran thanh
16 posts
no avatar 4. ichitan
11 posts
no avatar 5. JR Namida
5 posts