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Cassette buying advice needed
#1
Hi

Need some advice from the experts out there, I'm trying to decide what cassette to buy to replace the worn one on my bike, currently I have an 8 speed Shimano Hyperglide 30-11T.

I was going to replace like for like as I was very happy with the performance of it but looking on the net I am a bit baffled by all the choices.

What are the differences between the following and what would be the best option?

Shimano LX 8 speed HG70.

Shimano STX 8 Speed HG50

Shimano HG40.

Also is it worth sticking to the teeth ratios I have or going for something different?

I've seen 11-30T, 11-32T or 11-34T options on the last one and I just assume this will mean an easier pedal on the largest gear as your increasing the overall size.
Cannondale, handmade in USA............................................Refined in Surrey, England.
- Cannondale F500, Kona Blast, Kona Caldera-
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#2
First off what kind of bicycle is it.As for the 11-34t cassette make sure your rear derailleur can handle it. I think your best bet would be to stay with a Shimano HG70-I 8 Speed Mountain Bike Cassette. You can get it with the 11-30t at Amazon.com for 33.60+ shipping. I don't think you could tell to much with the 11-32t cassette but with a 11-34t cassette you could tell a lot. But then you rear derailleur may not can handle it to well or not at all. We need to also know what your chain ring is too. Hope this helps a little. Stay around here a few days and a lot of fine folks will give you all kinds of help here. Have a great day and be safe riding.
My dad always told me a Sledge a matic can fix any thing.
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#3
I'd go with a mid price Shimano or SRAM cassette, they should be ok. I avoid the light highest end stuff since I suspect it to wear faster. One question to consider: what is your current largest sprocket and do you use it often? (ok, two questions). If you never use it, get a cassette with a smaller largest sprocket. If you regularly use it and it seems too small, get a bigger one. I personally would probably go with a cassette that is a bit less widely spaced to always be in a comfortable gear.
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#4
Thanks for the replies. The bike it is going on will be a Cannondale F500. The chainwheels on the front are original coda, wouldn't know teeth ratios without looking / counting.

I Found a good website doing deals on bike stuff, also free delivery.

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Categories.aspx?CategoryID=540

To be honest I was perfectly happy with the original cassette but thought if I could go for a slightly better quality one whilst replacing it I would, not to sure what my original one is to be honest, it says Shimano Hyperglide - C and has the teeth ratios but very little else on it.

The thing is the STX and LX cassettes are the same price but are obviously different models, which one is the better one to go for?
Cannondale, handmade in USA............................................Refined in Surrey, England.
- Cannondale F500, Kona Blast, Kona Caldera-
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#5
Lx was the next grade up from STX.
The HG70 was LX and would be slightly lighter then HG50.
Performance wise I doubt you could tell the difference.
I have always used Lx (hg70) on my MTB but I use the best, cost wise, on my road bikes depending on the gear ratios I require.
I would advise you to get a new chain at the same time unless you have very recently fitted a new one.
New cassettes are notorious for showing up old chains. (Suddenly find the chain jumping at the back.)

Only you know which gear range is suitable for you.
If you don't climb steep hills you might try something with smaller cogs (ie, 11/28 or 12/27). But if you use the full range of your current cassette then stick with that.
What I would also advise is not to through away your old cassette!
I have "rescued" old cassettes by swapping sprockets over and even modified them to give a better ratio.
Ride hard or ride home alone!
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#6
Thanks for the reply Cycler

(03-22-2010, 11:22 AM)cyclerUK Wrote:  I would advise you to get a new chain at the same time unless you have very recently fitted a new one.
New cassettes are notorious for showing up old chains. (Suddenly find the chain jumping at the back.)

I was looking at an SRAM PC850 Chain to go with the new cassette, seems a good chain for the money and everyone seems to rate SRAM chains above Shimano.

This chain comes with one of those quick release links so it can be taken off for cleaning and maintenance, so ideal for what I want.
Cannondale, handmade in USA............................................Refined in Surrey, England.
- Cannondale F500, Kona Blast, Kona Caldera-
  Reply
#7
Make sure you take a chain tool out with you, or some spare split links.
Last thing you want is it pinging off in the middle of a ride. Happened to me, luckily I had a chain tool and just reconnected the chain, never used a split link since.
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#8
if you're going to get a quick-release chain, i'd go with a KMC. their quick links seem (to me) to be stronger than some other designs. i've been running a KMC on my MTB for a year now and it's been perfect and the quick link design works really well.
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#9
The SRAM PC850 is a great chain, and to be honest I wouldn't spend more than £15 on a chain as there's no real noticeable difference other than weight between those above it.

It's always worth carrying a few spare Powerlinks (couple of quid) as it's a lot less faff than using a chain tool, but I've never had a powerlink fail on me. Install them properly and they won't break, I find once installed the best thing to do is to spin the cranks until the powerlink is at the top of the chain belt, between the chainrings and cassette, hold the rear brake and push down on the cranks. This locks it into place.

I generally find chains that if chains break it's where you shortened it to fit your drivetrain. If you install it properly this won't happen (chains only break on weak links), and I've not had a chain break for about a year now (I ride every day).
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