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Training in the wind
#1
First, I am in Florida, so no jokes about how I got it easy. December through March can be very windy. I developed a great interval training for the wind. My route is basically to ride north or south into the wind, out and back. Here's the training. Out of the saddle, into the wind, huge gear 53 16/18. 15, 30, 45, 60-second pyramid with alternating recoveries - 5-15 minutes. If you can call it recovery, riding into a 15-20 mph block headwind! Avg. speed is around 15mph and 25 with the tailwind heading home. Great hill training, watts, endurance, heart rate.
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#2
(01-29-2024, 03:46 PM)SPINMAN Wrote:  First, I am in Florida, so no jokes about how I got it easy. December through March can be very windy. I developed a great interval training for the wind. My route is basically to ride north or south into the wind, out and back. Here's the training. Out of the saddle, into the wind, huge gear 53 16/18. 15, 30, 45, 60-second pyramid with alternating recoveries - 5-15 minutes. If you can call it recovery, riding into a 15-20 mph block headwind! Avg. speed is around 15mph and 25 with the tailwind heading home. Great hill training, watts, endurance, heart rate.

I just had that type of ride (Gainesville to Starke FL) except the intervals were only at stoppages (8 over 26 miles); but I was riding into a 15mph headwind, and steady climb. I worked at 44T x 13, keeping my average speed @ 14.5mph into the wind. I did not do the return trip, but I probably would have averaged just over 20mph on the tailwind leg if completing a half century continuous ride.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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#3
(01-29-2024, 09:57 PM)Jesper Wrote:  
(01-29-2024, 03:46 PM)SPINMAN Wrote:  First, I am in Florida, so no jokes about how I got it easy. December through March can be very windy. I developed a great interval training for the wind. My route is basically to ride north or south into the wind, out and back. Here's the training. Out of the saddle, into the wind, huge gear 53 16/18. 15, 30, 45, 60-second pyramid with alternating recoveries - 5-15 minutes. If you can call it recovery, riding into a 15-20 mph block headwind! Avg. speed is around 15mph and 25 with the tailwind heading home. Great hill training, watts, endurance, heart rate.

I just had that type of ride (Gainesville to Starke FL) except the intervals were only at stoppages (8 over 26 miles); but I was riding into a 15mph headwind, and steady climb. I worked at 44T x 13, keeping my average speed @ 14.5mph into the wind. I did not do the return trip, but I probably would have averaged just over 20mph on the tailwind leg if completing a half century continuous ride.

So you know our windy winter. I did that yesterday 53/11 two minute interval shredding the legs. You got hills; I am all flat roads except for the bridges. Stay safe.
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#4
Big Grin 
(01-30-2024, 07:18 AM)SPINMAN Wrote:  
(01-29-2024, 09:57 PM)Jesper Wrote:  
(01-29-2024, 03:46 PM)SPINMAN Wrote:  First, I am in Florida, so no jokes about how I got it easy. December through March can be very windy. I developed a great interval training for the wind. My route is basically to ride north or south into the wind, out and back. Here's the training. Out of the saddle, into the wind, huge gear 53 16/18. 15, 30, 45, 60-second pyramid with alternating recoveries - 5-15 minutes. If you can call it recovery, riding into a 15-20 mph block headwind! Avg. speed is around 15mph and 25 with the tailwind heading home. Great hill training, watts, endurance, heart rate.

I just had that type of ride (Gainesville to Starke FL) except the intervals were only at stoppages (8 over 26 miles); but I was riding into a 15mph headwind, and steady climb. I worked at 44T x 13, keeping my average speed @ 14.5mph into the wind. I did not do the return trip, but I probably would have averaged just over 20mph on the tailwind leg if completing a half century continuous ride.

So you know our windy winter. I did that yesterday 53/11 two minute interval shredding the legs. You got hills; I am all flat roads except for the bridges. Stay safe.

A little kinder wind and temperature for today's 60km!
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#5
Just curious how you do this interval training. I have a Garmin watch to keep track of mileage/stats but haven't used it beyond that. What's a good way to train, instead of just riding? I mostly choose hilly routes to get some challenges in but that's about it. Any pointers are helpful. Thanks
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#6
(01-31-2024, 10:40 AM)GirishH Wrote:  Just curious how you do this interval training. I have a Garmin watch to keep track of mileage/stats but haven't used it beyond that. What's a good way to train, instead of just riding? I mostly choose hilly routes to get some challenges in but that's about it. Any pointers are helpful. Thanks

What kind of Garmin Watch do you have? there's some pre loaded "coaching" programs even for cycling when you look at the app. but for the meatier training bits I think they require you to get the Garmin power meter and Cyclocomp
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#7
(01-31-2024, 10:40 AM)GirishH Wrote:  Just curious how you do this interval training. I have a Garmin watch to keep track of mileage/stats but haven't used it beyond that. What's a good way to train, instead of just riding? I mostly choose hilly routes to get some challenges in but that's about it. Any pointers are helpful. Thanks

I learned most of my interval training as a Spinning instructor and Johnny G training for 25 years and adapted to outdoor cycling and vice-versa. I take what I learn from outdoor rides to indoor training. It involves, for the most part, heart rate training in different zones. Endurance, strength, race day, and recovery. Yes, recovery is an important part of intervals. It's important to know your resting heart rate and your max HR. After that, you can curate your own interval training for your goals. My own training right now is big-gear, low-cadence, HR at AT (anaerobic threshold). Since I have no hills to challenge me in Florida, that's what I do indoors and out, so I'm ready for my travel to the mountains! Occasionally, I'll do high-cadence training as well as max HR sprints.
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#8
I have a Garmin Instinct but I should admit that I have used it mostly to track rides and distance. Occasionally I look at the elevation profile and heart-rate but nothing beyond that..:-(

(02-04-2024, 04:10 AM)meamoantonio Wrote:  
(01-31-2024, 10:40 AM)GirishH Wrote:  Just curious how you do this interval training. I have a Garmin watch to keep track of mileage/stats but haven't used it beyond that. What's a good way to train, instead of just riding? I mostly choose hilly routes to get some challenges in but that's about it. Any pointers are helpful. Thanks

What kind of Garmin Watch do you have? there's some pre loaded "coaching" programs even for cycling when you look at the app. but for the meatier training bits I think they require you to get the Garmin power meter and Cyclocomp

Thanks, Spinman. I know my resting and max HR. Rarely reach the max HR even on really strong, strenuous rides. Not sure if we are supposed to. But again, that max HR is from running days so might not get to that high of HR with biking.

I have biked most of my bike and am ashamed to admit that I always get confused between big/small gear. I do know that the "size" of the actual gear is the opposite of the gear "number". But I am assuming that you are referring to the gear where it's hardest to ride, so smallest cog I guess.

I will look more into cadence and anaerobic threshold...

I have run several marathons, ridden several century rides, and done months-long biking but rarely paid much attention to the actual terminology. Probably because I knew/learned when to change gears and which way to change them..:-)

But now when I am not riding long distances, I still want to stay in shape. Hence, trying to learn from you all. Thanks again.


(02-04-2024, 01:40 PM)SPINMAN Wrote:  
(01-31-2024, 10:40 AM)GirishH Wrote:  Just curious how you do this interval training. I have a Garmin watch to keep track of mileage/stats but haven't used it beyond that. What's a good way to train, instead of just riding? I mostly choose hilly routes to get some challenges in but that's about it. Any pointers are helpful. Thanks

I learned most of my interval training as a Spinning instructor and Johnny G training for 25 years and adapted to outdoor cycling and vice-versa. I take what I learn from outdoor rides to indoor training. It involves, for the most part, heart rate training in different zones. Endurance, strength, race day, and recovery. Yes, recovery is an important part of intervals. It's important to know your resting heart rate and your max HR. After that, you can curate your own interval training for your goals. My own training right now is big-gear, low-cadence, HR at AT (anaerobic threshold). Since I have no hills to challenge me in Florida, that's what I do indoors and out, so I'm ready for my travel to the mountains! Occasionally, I'll do high-cadence training as well as max HR sprints.
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#9
Oval rings are a must for me. I'm constantly traveling west, which is where the wind blows from constantly.

I'm also constantly climbing Ohio hills.

Oval rings really bring those challenges within grasp with the extra drive they provide.

Have you thought about training with a parachute? I had once, but the thought of it alone kinda drains me when I'm already constantly against the wind and uphill. The conditions I face can be grueling alone.
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#10
(01-29-2024, 03:46 PM)SPINMAN Wrote:  First, I am in Florida, so no jokes about how I got it easy. December through March can be very windy. I developed a great interval training for the wind. My route is basically to ride north or south into the wind, out and back. Here's the training. Out of the saddle, into the wind, huge gear 53 16/18. 15, 30, 45, 60-second pyramid with alternating recoveries - 5-15 minutes. If you can call it recovery, riding into a 15-20 mph block headwind! Avg. speed is around 15mph and 25 with the tailwind heading home. Great hill training, watts, endurance, heart rate.

I do the same training along the National Seashore from Navarre Beach to Pensacola Beach in the cold months. Wind is usually west to East or a crosswind which is a sufferfest each way. I know I am making progress when I get a New PR on segments. When I return to Idaho I ride with a local Club and I am able to Pull or hang with the younger riders. Makes a world of difference when tackling hills or long climbs out west. Good to know there is someone else out there that sees the wind as a training partner.
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