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Patching a tire
#1
In the past I have had a lot of punctures. When they happened, I patched the tube, but the holes in the tire were so small, they did not need patching. After many more kilometers, rubber started coming away around two of the holes in the tire, exposing the chords. If I did not do anything, a rock could cut the chords, destroying the tire. I wanted to get more use out of the tire.

I cut patches from the sidewall of an old tire, and glued them inside the tire where the holes were.

I covered the outside of the chords and surrounding rubber, with contact glue, which sets like rubber, and forms a protective layer over them.

This has enabled me to get more use out of the tire.

In the past, I had a similar situation. I used two layers of truck tube to form a patch inside the tire. This failed. The patch stretched a little, forming a bulge. This bulge wore faster than the rest of the tire, which resulted in an even bigger bulge. When patching the inside of a tire, you must use something that does not stretch. The sidewall of an old tire is good for this.
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#2
This is something I've seen recommended before—supergluing holes in your tread.

In my experience, the necessity for this depends on the type of tire you are using (the rubber compound used to make that tire); but also the size of the tire in question. Larger tires in the x2.00 range don't really need this; all the way into the x1.5 range. But narrower tires in the 32c/25c/23c are more sensitive to this type of damage and thus are in greater risk of the damage developing further.
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#3
(11-09-2022, 11:42 AM)ReapThaWhirlwind Wrote:  This is something I've seen recommended before—supergluing holes in your tread.

In my experience, the necessity for this depends on the type of tire you are using (the rubber compound used to make that tire); but also the size of the tire in question. Larger tires in the x2.00 range don't really need this; all the way into the x1.5 range. But narrower tires in the 32c/25c/23c are more sensitive to this type of damage and thus are in greater risk of the damage developing further.

The tire is a fat bike tire, 4 inches or 100 mm wide. I don't know what the rubber compound is. It is black, but they all are.

Ordinary super glue sets rigid, and does not flex like rubber. I think it has the potential to do more damage. I have heard there is a type of superglue which is more flexible when it sets. I have not had it.

The critical part is the patch on the inside, which in most cases would solve the problem, even without anything on the outside. The contact glue on the outside, is like reapplying rubber over the hole where it has been damaged.

On the internet, I have also heard of someone gluing a fabric on the inside of the tire. It needs to be a strong fabric which does not stretch. I like to cut a patch from the sidewall of an old tire.
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#4
There are patch kits available for tires - might try using the sealant that is used for tubeless tires. Instead of inserting it, just use a little on the inside to fill the small holes.
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#5
(11-26-2022, 01:43 PM)wocot Wrote:  There are patch kits available for tires - might try using the sealant that is used for tubeless tires. Instead of inserting it, just use a little on the inside to fill the small holes.

If you are using a tube, the problem is not the tire leaking air, it is the chords getting damaged, which results in the tire bulging out, and wearing quickly, which results in a bigger bulge, and soon the tire is destroyed. A patch on the inside, made from something which does not stretch, prevents the bulge.

I have had a lot of punctures. With most, when using a tube, you don't need to do anything to the tire. Only a small proportion damage chords.
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#6
I second this.
I was gonna write the same thing, but I'm glad you already wrote it
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#7
(11-28-2022, 12:08 PM)Talha Wrote:  I second this.
I was gonna write the same thing, but I'm glad you already wrote it

Hint: If you are going to "second this" -- you might want to include at least a partial quote to let us know what "this" you are seconding.
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#8
I completed a project in which I used sealant to repair tubeless tires on bike. First, I remove my bike tire from the body. Insert my plastic tire lever between the previously opened spaces from the bead and bike rim. Grasp the lever and pull the tool towards yourself with ample force to loosen the rest of the bead that is connected to the rim. After you have found the location of the puncture, position the tire bead so that the damaged area faces the floor. Finally, after applying the sealant, reattach the tire bead to the rim and pump in air until a popping sound is heard. 
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#9
After a fair amount of trouble with tubes, I switched to tubeless and life has been smooth.
It's a nice hack to save a tire, but it's time we switched to tubeless.

Anyhow, why would you want to use a tube, any specific reason? terrain? being able to carry an extra tube for repair?
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#10
Tire maintenance is a key part of keeping your bike tires in good shape. Check your tire pressure, and make sure you’re using the correct type and amount of air pressure for your tires, depending on the weather and terrain you’ll be riding on. If you have done everything you can to fix a flat tubeless tirefix a flat tubeless tire and your tire is still not functional, then it is time to give up and change a tubeless mountain bike tire to a new one.
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