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Patching a tire
#1
In the past I have had a lot of punctures. When they happened, I patched the tube, but the holes in the tire were so small, they did not need patching. After many more kilometers, rubber started coming away around two of the holes in the tire, exposing the chords. If I did not do anything, a rock could cut the chords, destroying the tire. I wanted to get more use out of the tire.

I cut patches from the sidewall of an old tire, and glued them inside the tire where the holes were.

I covered the outside of the chords and surrounding rubber, with contact glue, which sets like rubber, and forms a protective layer over them.

This has enabled me to get more use out of the tire.

In the past, I had a similar situation. I used two layers of truck tube to form a patch inside the tire. This failed. The patch stretched a little, forming a bulge. This bulge wore faster than the rest of the tire, which resulted in an even bigger bulge. When patching the inside of a tire, you must use something that does not stretch. The sidewall of an old tire is good for this.
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#2
This is something I've seen recommended before—supergluing holes in your tread.

In my experience, the necessity for this depends on the type of tire you are using (the rubber compound used to make that tire); but also the size of the tire in question. Larger tires in the x2.00 range don't really need this; all the way into the x1.5 range. But narrower tires in the 32c/25c/23c are more sensitive to this type of damage and thus are in greater risk of the damage developing further.
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#3
(11-09-2022, 11:42 AM)ReapThaWhirlwind Wrote:  This is something I've seen recommended before—supergluing holes in your tread.

In my experience, the necessity for this depends on the type of tire you are using (the rubber compound used to make that tire); but also the size of the tire in question. Larger tires in the x2.00 range don't really need this; all the way into the x1.5 range. But narrower tires in the 32c/25c/23c are more sensitive to this type of damage and thus are in greater risk of the damage developing further.

The tire is a fat bike tire, 4 inches or 100 mm wide. I don't know what the rubber compound is. It is black, but they all are.

Ordinary super glue sets rigid, and does not flex like rubber. I think it has the potential to do more damage. I have heard there is a type of superglue which is more flexible when it sets. I have not had it.

The critical part is the patch on the inside, which in most cases would solve the problem, even without anything on the outside. The contact glue on the outside, is like reapplying rubber over the hole where it has been damaged.

On the internet, I have also heard of someone gluing a fabric on the inside of the tire. It needs to be a strong fabric which does not stretch. I like to cut a patch from the sidewall of an old tire.
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#4
There are patch kits available for tires - might try using the sealant that is used for tubeless tires. Instead of inserting it, just use a little on the inside to fill the small holes.
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#5
(11-26-2022, 01:43 PM)wocot Wrote:  There are patch kits available for tires - might try using the sealant that is used for tubeless tires. Instead of inserting it, just use a little on the inside to fill the small holes.

If you are using a tube, the problem is not the tire leaking air, it is the chords getting damaged, which results in the tire bulging out, and wearing quickly, which results in a bigger bulge, and soon the tire is destroyed. A patch on the inside, made from something which does not stretch, prevents the bulge.

I have had a lot of punctures. With most, when using a tube, you don't need to do anything to the tire. Only a small proportion damage chords.
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#6
I second this.
I was gonna write the same thing, but I'm glad you already wrote it
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#7
(11-28-2022, 12:08 PM)Talha Wrote:  I second this.
I was gonna write the same thing, but I'm glad you already wrote it

Hint: If you are going to "second this" -- you might want to include at least a partial quote to let us know what "this" you are seconding.
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#8
After a fair amount of trouble with tubes, I switched to tubeless and life has been smooth.
It's a nice hack to save a tire, but it's time we switched to tubeless.

Anyhow, why would you want to use a tube, any specific reason? terrain? being able to carry an extra tube for repair?
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#9
Depends on the damage.

If all you're talking about is small cuts in the tread but into the threads, then Gorilla Glue Super Glue is the best, though you may have re-apply it after every ride. Gorilla Glue version of Super glue is currently the best of the Super Glues on the market. The glue will help prevent future debris from finding the cut and then going through the treads easier. I've been doing this for years, and never damaged the tire further by doing so. I tried flexible glues, but those tend to come undone from the tire faster than Super Glue does

If you're talking about large damage that cut the threads pretty good, I just use Park Tire Boot, this boot will allow me to get home with no problem. Once you get a significant cut or damage to a tire you shouldn't be patching it thinking you're going to ride it till it wears out, that tire is compromised, it's time to replace it, and do so for your safety.

Minor cuts where the threads are just barely, then use Gorilla Glue Super Glue on the outside; then depending on the size of the cut, a standard tire patch will work, but you will have to use Super Glue on the patch to make sure it stays stuck.

In emergencies a person can use a dollar bill if needed, candy wrappers are too fragile for this purpose.

Now there is a method to fixing large cuts/gashes in tires that could make it a permanent fix if you don't mind the time and the work involved in doing it, which could be worthwhile if you have an almost new tire You will need a few needles made for leather repair or stitching. Next, you need a wax thread also made for leather repair or stitching, some say you can also use a fishing line which I disagree with since UV rays can damage the fishing line and won't hold up as long, linen thread is another option but it's not quite as strong as leather thread, but better than fishing line. Need a pair of sharp scissors to cut the thread to prevent fraying. Basically, you stitch the tire back together as you would stitch a rip in upholstery, you can watch YouTube videos on how to either stitch a ripped tire or how to stitch upholstery. Once you're done tie the ends off then cut the ends of the thread off, however, you need to coat the area you will be cutting with Super Glue so it won't fray when you're cutting it; and then spread a thin coat of Super glue over the threads inside and out to help them stay locked in place. I have never had to do that, but a friend of mine has and does work, but it's labor-intensive and time-consuming.
Wag more, bark less
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#10
You need to stop further damage to the cords from outside interference, so you use Superglue to fill in holes and cuts, however, regular Super glue is too brittle and doesn't flex, so after every ride you have to put more glue in the hole and cuts.

So what we need is a flexible super glue such as KISS Molecular Super Bond, Rigid & Flexible, Waterproof, 20 Grams, Clear Super Glue; or, Loctite 1363589 0.14 Oz Ultra Gel™ Rubber Toughened Super Glue.
Wag more, bark less
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