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QUINTANA ROO "KILO" 1999
#1
Quintana Roo "Kilo" USA made! Photos in next post.

I figured with this bike being over 20yrs old it might qualify as vintage. It also has indexing to friction shifting options so it somewhat overlaps the old and the new.

A very lightweight ("KILO" model refers to frame being one Kilogram/2.2 lbs) alloy bike with aero tubing frame, "wishbone" seat and chain stays, and aero carbon fork. Set-up as a "Tri" bike with Profile Design "Carbon Stryke" Ironman carbon aero bars with Shimano bar end shifters, Cane Creek headset, Shimano 105 drivetrain, HyperGlide 9 speed cassette, Shimano 105 "Hollowtech" "Octalink" crankset (53T/39T, 170mm), SRAM chain, and Tiagra brakes with Dia Compe bar end levers. Classic LOOK A5.1 racing pedals driving 650c/26" wheels, Velocity "DeepV" rims with Hutchinson "Carbon Comp" tires. Lightweight titanium rail leather bound Q-Roo badged Velo saddle. X-small to small frame size 46cm (center to top) seat tube and 48cm (center to center) top tube, approximately 71.5cm/28" stand over height. Putting it up for sale, less pedals (will come with xtra lightweight Wellgo caged pedals, much lighter than the LOOK set), and Ti saddle included at a premium, new Bontrager included as standard. Professionally race maintained, super clean! Very minimal wear and tear (couple of minor paint chips and minor component scratches) from transportation, etc.; no crashes. Probably one of the last Q-Roo frames made in the USA (company is under its 3rd or 4th ownership, all frames made in Asia now and only assembled in the USA). Great ride, I'd love one my size; but way too small for me when I test rode it. I had it checked out by a friend who is 5'1" without issues to see how it fit a smaller rider. Probably best for women, men, and junior riders 4'8"-5'0". Maybe up to 5'2" depending on upper body reach. Only used for racing by the woman's daughter l bought it from; she outgrew it and needed a larger frame. I will post in the "market" forum.

Take care,
Jesper
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#2
QUINTANA ROO "KILO" 1999
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
       
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Take care,
Jesper


Attached Files Image(s)
   
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#3
Last but not least:

   
   
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#4
well maintained and fresh-looking. kudos for the post, Jesper!
  Reply
#5
(07-15-2020, 05:21 PM)Papa Dom Wrote:  well maintained and fresh-looking. kudos for the post, Jesper!

Thanks Dom!

It would be killer in my size, but it needs to go. I cannot ride it under the best of circumstances; even "stretched out" on the aero bars didn't help any, saddle as high as it could go. I can't find anything out about the frame maker Omnium, I guess out of Cal. There is a decal on the frame with their name and a "serial #"? Quintana Roo started out as an American built bike, but that changed sometime around the year(s) after this frame was built. I was told it was a 1999, but it may be '00-'01. I think the Shimano 105 group is original so I can check some date codes; not sure about the Tiagra calipers. There was a model called the "KILO 105" (year(s) unknown) as the entry/mid-level component group on the "KILO" frame design.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#6
I just sold this bike after a year of waiting. Went for $375 (w/o pedals) so the waiting was worth it; made about $100 after all was said and done.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#7
(08-05-2021, 01:08 AM)Jesper Wrote:  I just sold this bike after a year of waiting. Went for $375 (w/o pedals) so the waiting was worth it; made about $100 after all was said and done.

well done! was it sold to someone local?
  Reply
#8
(08-05-2021, 02:27 PM)Papa Dom Wrote:  
(08-05-2021, 01:08 AM)Jesper Wrote:  I just sold this bike after a year of waiting. Went for $375 (w/o pedals) so the waiting was worth it; made about $100 after all was said and done.

well done! was it sold to someone local?

I did the Craigslist thing in the end and it didn't take too long after that so kept it local. I did not want to dismantle a bike after putting it together. Shipping is a pain in the butt, and you eliminate the liability relating to damage claims; take it directly from my hand to yours, done deal! I hate getting a bike shipped to me for many reasons above and beyond the cost.

Lesson learned in progress: Most recently I bought an online bike that would make a great rebuild with better components. After agreeing with the seller about their shipping cost and paying for everything; the seller came back and said it would take a larger box and thus a higher shipping cost (the bike was in Berlin Germany, @Zviedrs help!). The bike cost $350 (1970s Chesini Gran Premio), shipping WAS $95 (about normal, usually about $90-$125 standard freight). The new shipping cost IS $300! I guess the bike grew in size and weight; I offered another $80 for the shipping since the bike value easily exceeds $600 considering condition and parts fitted. The seller reneged and cancelled my order first saying that my address was not correct (a lie which they later admitted to; and then just said that they could not ship it "safely" (BS!!)). They realized that I got the bike at a very good price and now wanted to make a greater profit on it. It has now become a legal issue related to a fraudulent sale and breach of a sales contract. Kind of like a "bait and switch" scam, but the fool already admitted in writing that they lied so I am pressing the issue to still receive the bike even though they offered a refund, and turned down my offer to pay more shipping on my own which they should have taken and just dealt with a little less profit. For all I know they got the bike for free so I don't feel at all sorry when they initiated everything, but then changed in mid stream. The bike is not worth over $750 except on the best of days as it sits so paying $650 total is out of the question, especially since I may have to pay a customs fee of about 10% of the claimed value (tip: if you can get the seller to put claim at a lower value then you will pay less customs or possibly none at all; its a gray area, but worth it!).

Thus, a good reason to avoid getting a bike shipped to you and/or having to ship a bike yourself.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#9
The bike that keeps on giving! After selling this bike nearly 3 years ago it is back in the stable again. I sold it to a young girl's (approx. 15yrs old) parents and let them know that being a smaller frame they might have to up-size in a few years taking into consideration their child's growth which is how I came upon the bike the first place; previous rider outgrew it. Presently the girl is riding her training bike (45cm) which has also been said to be too small at this point in time, but had a slightly longer top tube.
Apparently she grew over an inch and a half and now wants a bigger bike. The Kilo is 46cm, now needs approx. 48cm x 50cm which will allow for a little more growth while being comfortable at present. Unfortunately, I have nothing of that size in the style bike they want. I know they are unhappy with having to buy a new bike at the current prices (expect to pay about $2500 for a basic new bike so I am in search of a small Tri style bike that I can build up in very short order since they want to work out a deal with having returned a bike and buying another. I think the daughter will have a lot more to say this time around which is good if I find something that I can customize to her needs aside from having a proper frame size. Thus far I have not had to pay anything to take the bike back, but if not using for trade-in value for a new bike I would about $150-$200 since at this time I have made a profit on the previous sale and would sell at cost just to move it out the door again. I think $300 would now be the max value so selling for $150-$200 should not be a major problem and no loss to speak of.

The Kilo is still in great condition with maybe a small scratch or two. It was well maintained for racing purposes so it was not neglected mechanically and looks to be in excellent operable condition. One quick service and test ride should be enough to get everything correct if not already, and put it back up for sale.

I would still like to find one in my size since I am curious as to the ride quality of the frame (alloy, CF fork). I was unable to ride the Kilo for any great distance due to being too crammed while riding which is not a valid way to determine how a frame will feel and handle.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#10
(07-11-2020, 09:39 AM)Jesper Wrote:  QUINTANA ROO "KILO" 1999

That looks incredible and in such amazing shape! I have a QR SR6 and I have to say, it's my fastest bike. I'm a big fan of QR. Have you compared it to their newer models? What do you think?

There is something to be said for rim brakes and "manual" shifting, but I do love the tech of Di2 and hydraulic brakes.















Take care,
Jesper
  Reply
#11
(04-26-2024, 09:16 AM)Amanda_W Wrote:  
(07-11-2020, 09:39 AM)Jesper Wrote:  QUINTANA ROO "KILO" 1999

That looks incredible and in such amazing shape! I have a QR SR6 and I have to say, it's my fastest bike. I'm a big fan of QR. Have you compared it to their newer models? What do you think?

There is something to be said for rim brakes and "manual" shifting, but I do love the tech of Di2 and hydraulic brakes.



Thanks Amanda!
I would like the bike I have to be my size but so far no luck. That alloy frame is one of the last US made QRs and has "fillet" style conjunctions which is something you don't see on TIG welded (I believe) frames very often; a sign of quality and workmanship.

I am 60 so having a CF framed bike with discs (disc wheels, yes!) does not really apply to me. I am comfortable after 50 years of use with rim brakes (in good working order and properly adjusted of course); and prefer their looks, ease of ajustment and maintenance, lighterweight, etc. The durability of steel and alloy over CF frames to avoid possible catastrophic damage during transporting and other potential mishaps is a reason I am not worried about getting a molded CF frame (my CF bike is a Colnago Carbitubo, but the frame uses CF round tubes with alloy lugs), plus I have about 12 personal bikes to keep me covered should one fail. If I was given a modern CF bike I doubt that I would use it much since unless I could set it up with full friction or friction option shifting (something I like about that 105 bar-end shifter on the QR).

I am aware that the QR SR6 is road bike geometry and not Tri-bike. That would appeal to me depending on gearing options, and it has a more impressive aerodynamic signature (per lab test comparisons) compared to some other bigger brands (no names will be given).












Take care,
Jesper
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#12
I have a steel fixie that is fun to ride - I definitely love the simplicity of the rim brakes (plus no shifting haha). But I only ride it on relatively flat terrian :-)

Do you typically fix up bikes and resell them?

(04-29-2024, 12:51 PM)Jesper Wrote:  
(04-26-2024, 09:16 AM)Amanda_W Wrote:  
(07-11-2020, 09:39 AM)Jesper Wrote:  QUINTANA ROO "KILO" 1999

That looks incredible and in such amazing shape! I have a QR SR6 and I have to say, it's my fastest bike. I'm a big fan of QR. Have you compared it to their newer models? What do you think?

There is something to be said for rim brakes and "manual" shifting, but I do love the tech of Di2 and hydraulic brakes.



Thanks Amanda!
I would like the bike I have to be my size but so far no luck. That alloy frame is one of the last US made QRs and has "fillet" style conjunctions which is something you don't see on TIG welded (I believe) frames very often; a sign of quality and workmanship.

I am 60 so having a CF framed bike with discs (disc wheels, yes!) does not really apply to me. I am comfortable after 50 years of use with rim brakes (in good working order and properly adjusted of course); and prefer their looks, ease of ajustment and maintenance, lighterweight, etc. The durability of steel and alloy over CF frames to avoid possible catastrophic damage during transporting and other potential mishaps is a reason I am not worried about getting a molded CF frame (my CF bike is a Colnago Carbitubo, but the frame uses CF round tubes with alloy lugs), plus I have about 12 personal bikes to keep me covered should one fail. If I was given a modern CF bike I doubt that I would use it much since unless I could set it up with full friction or friction option shifting (something I like about that 105 bar-end shifter on the QR).

I am aware that the QR SR6 is road bike geometry and not Tri-bike. That would appeal to me depending on gearing options, and it has a more impressive aerodynamic signature (per lab test comparisons) compared to some other bigger brands (no names will be given).












Take care,
Jesper
  Reply
#13
(04-29-2024, 06:52 PM)Amanda_W Wrote:  I have a steel fixie that is fun to ride - I definitely love the simplicity of the rim brakes (plus no shifting haha). But I only ride it on relatively flat terrian :-)

Do you typically fix up bikes and resell them?

I used to fix up bikes a few years back for resale. Now it is for hobby/conservation purposes or someone asking me to do it through word of mouth. I prefer to find something odd and unknown work on it and either ride it or gift it. Selling stuff is a pain and is often a waste of my time. Easier to be asked for something I know I have been paid for in advance. Selling a vintage TT/Tri bike (or amy bike) is hard considering you can pick up a fairly cheap CF bike; plus, frame sizes limit the market. The bike sells when someone rides it and realizes that it is quite a nice ride for an old bike.

My general opinion is that most average riders are not getting any real advantage or only a negligible advantage for spending tons of cash on bikes that are technically designed and tested for benefits gained riding at average speeds well above 25 mph in order to provide any real aerodynamic effect. I'm not saying that one should not buy something of quality or just that they want it, but many folks are getting (being sold) bikes that are well above their present and future needs (mostly refers to older riders [me?] who are being called "MAMILs"; buy high dollars, ride low miles). Your body area and body weight are the biggest factors determining aerodynamics and power to weight ratios. A bike, whether antique or modern has essentially no aerodynamic drag when compared to the human body; and even my 50 lb 3 speed roadster cruises along just fine when I couch down on it a little more than my upright sightseeing position I am in when just smelling the roses so even a heavier bike is nothing compared to a body. Most of my race bikes are 20-22 lbs; spending about $1000 per pound of weight reduction only mattered to me when racing. For me to purchase a professional top of the line lightweight racing bike comparable to what I rode in the 80s would be about $8K+. When training, commuting, and touring I have already added 5 to 20 pounds of cargo/H2O, and I do not notice the weight of the bike only its balance/handling which important for all riding.
I will say that, without knowing my skills or history, bike shops tend to steer me towards a new bike based on what bike I rode in on or how I'm dressed since I do not dress like your typical road cyclist by wearing comfortable loose shirts and shorts or jeans. I'm never in the market to buy a new bike, and although I came in for a tube or tire they yry to push a $3000-$5000 bike on me (my last car cost $3000!); and those are the "cheap" bikes. I say buy a modern CF bike if you are into competition, otherwise buy a nice (still hundreds to thousands of $) used bike or new "low-end" bike which will do what the ultra-expensive bikes do and use the thousands of dollars leftover to take a vaction with your loved one(s) to a cycling rich environment.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply


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