Have questions or want to discuss cycling? Join Now or Sign In to participate in the BikeRide community.

New: Take part in the May Giveaway for DERUIZ LAVA e-bike worth $1699


ebikes and regular bikes
#1
  Reply
#2
i used to be sceptical about ebikes and perceived it as being a vehicle for sloppy bikers. if you are healthy and capable of biking, then why use a motor? over time, this viewpoint has changed and i've become more open. i see three reasons why someone would jump from regular to electric: 1) fitness level; 2) age; 3) terrain ... perhaps, also windy regions. a colleague of mine went to Europe for few weeks and did bike rides in the Alps. he commutes on bike regularly, here in the States, but those 5-10% incline climbs and regular uphills were too much for a family vacation. after a trial day on regular MTBs, they switched to ebikes and didn't regret it. they still burned lots of calories and pumped up those legs, yet the motor helped significantly in crucial moments. they are simply not used to long uphill bike rides. from ebike to regular? i can imagine a situation where someone has made progress in terms of fitness, gained confidence on ebike, and wants to take it to the next level.
  Reply
#3
Any bike that gets people in the open air is a good thing. I call my wife's bike the "Marriage Saver". We go on a ride together, and I can push it as fast as I want. She dials in the pedal assist needed to keep up. I don't wait for her, and she doesn't struggle to keep up with me. It's a win for both of us. This is an interesting read: https://www.bicycling.com/training/a23610389/how-e-bikes-affect-fitness/
Justin Schultz
2020 Scott Scale 970
2021 Felt Breed 30
  Reply
#4
(03-29-2020, 09:02 PM)J_R_Schultz Wrote:  Any bike that gets people in the open air is a good thing. I call my wife's bike the "Marriage Saver". We go on a ride together, and I can push it as fast as I want. She dials in the pedal assist needed to keep up. I don't wait for her, and she doesn't struggle to keep up with me. It's a win for both of us. This is an interesting read: https://www.bicycling.com/training/a23610389/how-e-bikes-affect-fitness/

Thanks for sharing your example and the link!
  Reply
#5
(03-29-2020, 09:02 PM)J_R_Schultz Wrote:  I call my wife's bike the "Marriage Saver". We go on a ride together, and I can push it as fast as I want. She dials in the pedal assist needed to keep up. I don't wait for her, and she doesn't struggle to keep up with me. It's a win for both of us.

That's sweet. When I see a group of 2+ biking (couples, families, group fun rides) it's either no ebikes or ebikes-for-everyone. It's not very common to see one person on a regular bike and one on ebike.
Merida Scultura 5000 (2015)
Merida Big Nine 400 (2019)
  Reply
#6
It cracks me up the hate Ebike riders get. Its cheating, I am told. So, I fit the demographic as an old person riding a bike. I ride to have fun. The ebike lets me have fun. So, therefore I am cheating. My wife and I have been through about 8 ebikes so far.

In search of a better ride. I would suggest to anyone, get the battery with the most amps. This gives you distance. One problem you might encounter is that your having so much fun, the battery has discharged all of its power. Your 5 miles from home pedaling a heavy bike. More amps more distance.

So, we have upgraded bikes for distance and then riding styles. Make sure you ask yourself, what's most comfortable for you? Beach Cruiser, vintage retro, mountain bike, road racer. Then ask if you want a throttle or just pedal assist. Whatever makes you happy, who are we to judge?
Most of all dress for the crash and not the ride.
TDK
  Reply
#7
I own a Stealth Urban Electric Bike KBO Hurricane I really enjoy the design, of this bicycle that can provide almost 40 miles on a single charge in level 1 of 3. I purchased the bicycle in May of 2021 and have only ridden 77 miles. I like the down tube hidden battery, it not one that is a large bulge on the down tube that can be kicked off, and easily stolen. Yes the battery is 9.7 Ahs not a very large capacity when compared to many of the larger obvious conversion kit styled batteries.

I could not find any eBike demos rides in Las Vegas in the $1,000/$1,200 price range. I read and watched many youtube reviews of the various eBikes in my price range, and made my decision after I watched a youtube review of a 220 pound person do a battery drain test @ 32 miles on the KBO Hurricane. I live on the third floor with narrow stair access and my major concern as a ebike owner choice was weight and a limited purchase budget.

In my opinion there are sub 27 pound eBikes that would be perfect for my desires, but that segment of the eBike market is far beyond my limited pocketbook. Then there are 28-40 pound midweight eBikes that can be carried up and down stairs, 41-50 pound heavy eBike that need secure overnight garage storage because they can't be carried upstairs, and 50 pound+ and above tank weight bicycles that also require very secure overnight garage storage.

The 28-40 pound midweight eBikes was my only option: my belief I could learn carry this weight of bicycle up and down the narrow stairs access. Or I could move to a more expensive location with a bicycle room. I called a few friends that lived with that type of common room, and discovered there had been thefts of bicycles in these common storage rooms over the years. Moving into a location with an elevator or apartment with a private attached garage is beyond my monthly budget consideration.

I liked the Ride1up Roadster V2 @ 33 pounds - $1,099
I liked the KBO Hurricane @ 36 pounds - $1,095
I liked the Babymaker @ 32 pounds - $1,900
I liked the Lemond Prolog @ 27 pounds - $4,500

I eliminated the choices above $1,100 quickly, and then the KBO became my choice after watching a battery drain youtube video by Top5ebikes.

Today I like the Torque 1 @ 38 pounds - $1,199 This eBike has a Torque Sensor that can provide motor assistance when your cadence slows down on inclines/short hills. I did not know about this shortcoming when I made my KBO Purchase. I still have some interest in the Accolmile XL06 700C Blue Road eBike 250w 10.5ah Hidden battery design. But their are not many reviews of these two bicycle to be found on the internet.

Owning a eBike you learn rapidly what they can do and can not do, mine is amazing on a 22 mile ride and a longer 32 mile ride. With me spinning the pedals on a flat pavement reaching 23 mph is and after thought in the highest power level. Trying to climb a long 3% grade my cadence will slow and the PAS sensor communicates to the controler I want less power assistance which slows my cadence more and eventually I am struggling to move forward, and sweating profusely in the summer temperatures. I have adjusted my rides to avoid a few short hills and the long 3% incline. Can't arrive at a client location sweating and offending everyone in the office with my bouquet...

As a eBike user I am now convinced a Torque Sensor is a eBike requirement, when you press on the pedals with increase force the motor must provide more assistance, regardless of your slowing cadence on a hills or incline. A throttle or powerful motor can provide climbing power, but the more I notice eBike riders with a throttle, they do not often peddle while using the throttle. Large powerful motors seem to be the favorite of fat tire tank weight eBike type of rider. In my area they terrorise neighborhoods ,or play on open spaces and mountain bike trails. I see a few neighborhood riders with large batteries that pass me often trying to keep up with traffic on the way to work, and hope they continue to concentrate on the cars and trucks traffic in my area that seem oblivious to all cyclists.

Will I keep my current eBike or sell it and try another eBike with a Torque Sensor in the near future? A decision I have not made yet, as I have kinda decided with all the modifications made to reduce the weight of my eBike and equip it with carbon fiber bits including road bike handlebars for many different hand positions maybe I will be slow to sell the very stylish KBO Hurricane. Yet one of my main goals for this electric bicycle purchase was to have motor assistance on inclines and get over short hills with less effort and not sweat in the summer heat.

If I had the access to both the Torque 1, and the Accolmile XL06 for a proper test riding, or several test rides. Maybe my almost new KBO Hurricane would be back to purchase condition and listed on Craigslist already. I know the limitations of the KBO, but not of the other two bicycles I can not find to test in my location, and there are few youtube reviews to watch that create a deliriously desire for a product switch.

JR


Attached Files Image(s)
   
  Reply
#8
I have yet to make the leap. Due to my distance (40 miles) from work and my hours it makes it hard for me to work a 9 hour day and cycle about 5-6 hours round trip, I would use a pedal assist bike because I don't think the bike would make 40 miles on a charge. I would still ride a regular bike for long rides just not when work is involved. I worry that I will enjoy an ebike to the extent that I may not want to be as motivated to get an just ride as I do now. I think it is best for me just to keep in decent shape until I cannot cycle in the same manner as I do now. Also, I would have no problem riding an ebike with others doing the same just to keep a proper group ride atmosphere. I doubt that I could keep pace with an ebike for very long if others are riding at 20 plus mph.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#9
(07-08-2021, 08:59 PM)Jesper Wrote:  I have yet to make the leap. Due to my distance (40 miles) from work and my hours it makes it hard for me to work a 9 hour day and cycle about 5-6 hours round trip, I would use a pedal assist bike because I don't think the bike would make 40 miles on a charge. I would still ride a regular bike for long rides just not when work is involved. I worry that I will enjoy an ebike to the extent that I may not want to be as motivated to get an just ride as I do now. I think it is best for me just to keep in decent shape until I cannot cycle in the same manner as I do now. Also, I would have no problem riding an ebike with others doing the same just to keep a proper group ride atmosphere. I doubt that I could keep pace with an ebike for very long if others are riding at 20 plus mph.

Jesper,

The eBike and road bikes are very different type of bicycles.

I enjoy riding my Ridley Excalibur a 17 pound carbon fiber road bicycle and find climbs and descent fun and doable with the 11-32 cassette. But when summer arrives here in the Vegas Valley unless it cools down overnight, I use the car for all errands, shopping and client visits.

I purchased the eBike in May, discovering it allowed me to ride to a few clients offices in the morning. Then we had 117°F (47.22°C) temperatures arrive in June. Have not ridden either bicycle much since the crazy hot above normal weather arrived. Tis now almost Mid July and less than 60 days of this warmth may be left, if the weather does manage to cool down overnight in September.

I am looking forward to early morning rides returning again, and I will ride the eBike more than has been possible with the current above normal warmth in my area. Jesper my under 10 Ah battery will allow a 40 mile one way commute. Unfortunately I think the time involved for an 80 mile round trip commute will take time you can not spare at a 15 mph average with cars and truck that are not very forgiving on the roadways we must share.

Tis easy to average above 20 mph on flat decadated pathways with a pedal bicycle, but very difficult to do that same average on city streets with traffic and stop lights. Regardless of using an eBike or regular hybrid bicycle for your commute.

JR

   

(03-01-2020, 07:52 PM)ManBearPig Wrote:  Ciao.
Why would you switch from a regular bike to an ebike and vice versa? I understand that seniors switch to electric bikes because of the age. Then there are "dads" who have electric cargo bike for carrying kids to school and back. What are the other reasons? Hills?

Maybe an ebike would allow you to arrive at work without sweating and sporting a unpleasant bouquet...

JR
  Reply
#10
[quote='JR Namida' pid='41646' dateline='1626133792']


"Jesper my under 10 Ah battery will allow a 40 mile one way commute. Unfortunately I think the time involved for an 80 mile round trip commute will take time you can not spare at a 15 mph average with cars and truck that are not very forgiving on the roadways we must share."

It would have about 9 plus hours to recharge; don't know how long these batteries take. Also, at 140 pounds, my power usage may be smaller due to weight and aerodynamics (less frontal surface area). I can pedal at well over 15 mph for hours so I need the 20 plus mph bike that can go for some distance.

"Tis easy to average above 20 mph on flat dedicated pathways with a pedal bicycle, but very difficult to do that same average on city streets with traffic and stop lights."

Easy for me in younger years , but now under my own power I may get one hour's worth of riding averaging 20mph minimum without being affected by stops, etc. My commute when I do it takes about 2.5-2.75 hours (depending on stops, weather, etc.); I really could do it into work at 2 hours under my own power, but my ride home would be at a slow pace and take 3 hours plus because I am recovering from the first ride and about 8 hours on my feet. If I was on an ebike an averaged anything over 20 mph and had 50 plus range on a charge than that would be a very feasible ride for my expected use because it would save at least 6 hours commute time each week which for me means sleep time gained. I would have to consider the power loss due to lights since night riding would be necessary on a daily basis.


"Maybe an ebike would allow you to arrive at work without sweating and sporting a unpleasant bouquet..."

I have shower facilities at the hospital so no issues there.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#11
Jealous of your shower facilities, wish I had that outstanding perk in my old job. I also presume you could also charge your eBike in a secure location so you could use the eBike on highest power level riding to work & home.

September I was hit and run, while riding my bicycle to the seldom used office. I ended up with 3 fractures of my pelvic bone. It has been a painful recovery, am now doing Physical Therapy 3 days a week, and discovered I have many muscles that havent been used in a long time. I am also carrying 30 pounds more weight with all the lack of activity. I did not cut my calorie intake, and haven't moved much since this painful event happened.

I have set up my rollers but still too painful to sit on a bicycle saddle. Maybe mid or end of February i can start to spin the pedals again. The Idiot that ruined my fall riding schedule has certainly changed my life, but I hope to recover and ride again.

JR
  Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread
Author
Replies
Views
Last Post

Forum Jump:

[-]
10 Latest Posts
Biking and running apps
Today 04:52 PM
Posting images
Today 03:34 PM
What are your thoughts on E-bikes?
Today 09:24 AM
Brake problems
Yesterday 11:32 AM
Entry level triathlon bike recs?
Yesterday 12:39 AM
How much do you bike a year
05-20-2022 06:55 AM
Please help me identify my '80's Bridges...
05-19-2022 11:27 PM
Installed Shimano Zee on GT Transeo 5.0
05-18-2022 07:57 PM
E-Bike
05-18-2022 02:50 AM
Unknown brand, should I buy or not?
05-18-2022 02:01 AM

[-]
Join BikeRide on Strava
Feel free to join if you are on Strava: www.strava.com/clubs/bikeridecom

[-]
Top 5 Posters This Month
no avatar 1. Jesper
28 posts
no avatar 2. ReapThaWhirlwind
22 posts
no avatar 3. tran thanh
15 posts
no avatar 4. ichitan
11 posts
no avatar 5. JR Namida
5 posts