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Clicking noise when going up slight incline
#1
I have a Kona Dew (commuter).

It has an 8 speed Sram chain with a Powerlink link.
I am getting a clicking noise when peddling even up a gradual incline- in every gear.

It seems too, that it clicks more when I have ridden for say a 1/2 hour.


Front derailleur is adjusted properly-no clicks there.

I took a close look at the chain (about a year since installed), and the Powerlink has a little more side play to it then all the other links in the chain.
Could this be the source of the click or is it normal for a Powerlink link to have a little play? Or should it have the same amount of play as any other link in the chain?

I would say that I oil my chain about every two weeks and wipe it with a rag after every other ride.

Suggestions/advice is appreciated.
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#2
Is the clicking noise?
* once per pedal rotation?
* once per wheel rotation?
* once per chain rotation?
* dependent on which gear you are in?
Nigel
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#3
(05-06-2013, 11:45 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  Is the clicking noise?
* once per pedal rotation?
* once per wheel rotation?
* once per chain rotation?
* dependent on which gear you are in?

Thanks for your questions that I forgot to include in my explanation:
clicking noise once per pedal rotation.
(clicking noise is similar to clicking noise when front derailleur out of adjustment)
Hard to tell if it is once per chain rotation, but I suspect so, strongly.

It does it in all gears (3x8 combinations).
I may have confused the issue in my first statement. In order to hear the clicking, there has to be moderate pressure on the pedals or going up an incline. Just back from 25k run, to prove it to myself.
Thanks for help.
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#4
Once per pedal rotation - prime candidates:
- tighten the crank arms on the bottom bracket
- tighten pedals (or better yet: remove pedals, grease threads and reinstall)

Secondary candidate:
- check front chainring bolts
- check pedal and bottom bracket bearings for smoothness
- check stem bolts & headset (you put a lot more force on the handlebars when you're cranking the pedals and in roughly the same timing as the pedals.)

Note that it typically takes a chain about 2-3 full pedal rotations to go around once. So if you hear a noise that happens every 2-3 pedal strokes, that points to the chain.
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#5
Adding a bit more detail to Dave's chain comment. A typical chain is 112 (half) links, your middle chain ring is 38T; 112/38 = 2.947. A chain noise is very rarely synchronized with pedal rotation.

Pedals needing rebuilding is a common source of once per pedal rev noise.

From the picture at Konaworld, it looks like the Dew has riveted chainrings.
Nigel
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#6
(05-06-2013, 03:15 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  Adding a bit more detail to Dave's chain comment. A typical chain is 112 (half) links, your middle chain ring is 38T; 112/38 = 2.947. A chain noise is very rarely synchronized with pedal rotation.

Pedals needing rebuilding is a common source of once per pedal rev noise.

From the picture at Konaworld, it looks like the Dew has riveted chainrings.

Not original chain, was replaced 1.5 years ago, with SRAM chain, and Powerlink. Would pedals still make noise when not under moderate pressure?
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#7
Got any friends with bikes? Swap pedals for a few minutes & you'll have your answer.
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#8
Replaced cassette, chain, bottom bracket still had a clicking sound, and then:

Checked pedals, skewers, bolts, , seat post lubrication,etc. -still heard clicks.

And then reviewed this webpage carefully:

http://www.jimlangley.net/wrench/keepitquiet.html#click

Did all the things posters suggested, except for the voodoo. -still clicked

And then took it back to bike shop, asking them to check bottom bracket, and chainring tightness. They were in disbelief that their parts and service would be the culprit. They took it for test ride with another bike following and couldn't hear anything.

Next day I bounced rode over a curb.

Clicking stopped.

Gave my rear rack a shake and a squeeze.

Loose bolt on chain side of rack.

Double checked, every time I pushed hard on right pedal, click would happen. Grabbed rack while pedaling, click stopped.

Problem solved.

Moral of the story: Sounds don't come from where you think they do, -And- it stands to reason to check the chain side of your bike first as this is where the most pressure whilst riding is applied. You the bike owner knows your bike and the peculiar sounds that it makes. It is Zen. You and your bike are one.

You can't expect the best bike shop in the world to fix an intermittent problem, especially when the bike shop is located on the flat prairie, and a few km from a hill or incline to do a good test work-out.
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