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"New" 'Muddyfox' MTB - a wretched project...
#1
Behold, my "New" bike. Well, I say New, it's an old MTB in very unloved, badly maintained condition. I picked it up free and am hoping to do a cheap rebuild into a worry-free hack for shopping journeys and tackling the very bumpy gravel road along the beach.

At first glance, it appears to be a Muddyfox. However, further investigation reveals that the horrific paint job and ridiculous fake Muddyfox decals are hiding a Merida. I've so-far concluded that it's a 2013 Matts 10-V.

Bunch of entry-level components, all suffering from wear, lack of servicing, etc. Someone's given the bike a liberal coating of what appears to be black stove enamel, LOL. Even the forks and cables got a dose!

Given that the paint/decal treatment has all the hallmarks of someone trying to hide a stolen bike, I've searched stolen bike databases but nothing's come up.

Here's the bike as offered on a local FB group:
   

"Happily" in its new home:
   

Just look at that beautiful paint!
   

As is typical with these things, the components (freewheel 7 speed rear hub, tired Acera/Altus/SE components, and crappy condition mean there's little to be gained by investing much money in this bike. Hopefully, I can bring most components back to life. It will need new tyres/toobz, shifters and cables for sure. If I can get it into serviceable condition again, MAYBE I'll consider stripping and a cheap new paint job when the weather improves.

What would YOU do with this miserable creature? I suppose if I can find a decent rigid fork, this could be a gravel ride but I'm not sure what shifters would work on drop bars.
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#2
Being as I can never help but to throw a couple hundo or more to a bike, hard pass on that puppy for me. Pay it forward and move on to a better project.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#3
Wink 
(01-20-2023, 12:15 PM)Painkiller Wrote:  Being as I can never help but to throw a couple hundo or more to a bike, hard pass on that puppy for me. Pay it forward and move on to a better project.

I don't think anyone else wants it, LOL.

The guy was on the verge of sending it for scrap.

He might have had the right idea, to be honest. Big Grin
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#4
(01-20-2023, 02:25 PM)enkei Wrote:  
(01-20-2023, 12:15 PM)Painkiller Wrote:  Being as I can never help but to throw a couple hundo or more to a bike, hard pass on that puppy for me. Pay it forward and move on to a better project.

I don't think anyone else wants it, LOL.

The guy was on the verge of sending it for scrap.

He might have had the right idea, to be honest. Big Grin
many times I have picked up bikes in a package deal and straight away just move them along. sometimes it is better make $20 than spend a hundo, take up time to make only $20. I feel your pain!
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#5
Fixer up.

A new crank, rear derailleur, shifter, brakes, maybe tires and ready.

Recently, I came across a bike hack where you can use a even strip of grip tape across the top tube to give the bike an aggressive look.
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#6
The only scenario That I would consider refurbishing this bike for is if it was owned by someone else that needed a bike that looked like crap but mechanically perfect to be dependable and not so appealing it is first pic to be stolen..i.e. college student. I know of no such way to do a cheap "rebuild". A rebuild is all in or it is not a rebuild at all. Cheap just does not happen. You could easily put over $250 in that bike or more to refurbish without including labor. Then end up with a bike that would be a hard sell for $150. Even though I am my own wrench I still have to consider time spent into the equation. What I do most is refurbish bicycles, Bicycles that bring sometimes even more than they cost new even after being years older. Only do what you are willing to put your name on, because that is what will define you whether you want it or not. Especially if you work on bikes for others and or a side hustle as the say. I would ask myself as long as I can sell it for at least the money I have in it, I might choose to do it. Thats the only way to protect yourself $ wise. Just in case afterwards i decide after using it that it is not quite the bike for me. One other caveat about this bike for me anyways is that I will not let myself become known to even sell bicycles like this in the first place. I want to be known for selling the best used bikes out there, Period! I have to be this way, but the average joe just doing their own thing, not so much. Perfect example of even a free bike can be costly up front. But know going in that this bike is not a flipper. but we are masters of our own destiny so if you are willing to make a good user out of it and it suits your needs go for it. Let your wallet be your guide!
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#7
(01-22-2023, 02:25 PM)ReapThaWhirlwind Wrote:  Fixer up.

A new crank, rear derailleur, shifter, brakes, maybe tires and ready.

Recently, I came across a bike hack where you can use a even strip of grip tape across the top tube to give the bike an aggressive look.

I still haven't got into it yet. I'm hoping the crank, derailleur and brakes can be saved. Will need shifters and tires/tubes for sure.

The forks are going to be 'interesting'. They would be pretty durned tired even if someone hadn't painted the top few inches of the stanchions, LOL. Once I've assessed the other parts of the bike, I'll figure out if the forks can be salvaged or maybe I'll fit rigid forks. This restoration definitely wants to be as 'cost-conscious' as possible.
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#8
Hello--
I work in a bike co-op and I've refurbished many of these.
My suggestion: turn it into a single-speed! Get the gear ratio that works for your inseam length and you'll have a fun, easy bike to get around town or whatever. I stripped down an old 90s GT Avalanche and turned it into a single-speed and now I ride it more than my fancy bike!
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