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Everest Nova 6s-freewheel service???
#1
   
Hi all,

I've got a mid-80s Everest Nova 6-speed freewheel in need of a service - disassembly, cleaning & reassembly. Anyone have experience with is model? I'm assuming the first cog(s) comes off to reveal the top cone ring, can anyone confirm? Pictures attached (hopefully).
   
It has come off a 1986 Wilier Triestina "Ramato" road bike that I'm currently restoring. I originally thought it was a Regina because it use the common 20 spline removal tool but, once I wiped-off some of the 30 year old grim, I could just decipher "Everest Nova Made in Italy". No other markings to be found so far - does this mean it's English/ISO threading? It came off an unmarked Miche Superfast hub that I'm looking to replace.

I'd also appreciate some more information on this freewheel and brand. Like, what was their reputation? Everest (and Caimi) don't make bicycle parts anymore, so were they just a minor player?

Apologies if this is the wrong section, let me know where I should post it.

PS: for those interested, I'm making the restoration into a little video series on youtube. Link to the intro video here: https://youtu.be/t-P6Y3TWayI
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#2
Is that a threaded freewheel?

Your best bet might be to just spray Triflow or PB Blaster on it.

Or soak it in a thin synthetic oil like you would a freehub body.

Mavic makes a 10w mineral oil, but any 10w synthetic should do the trick.

Hit it up with Purple Industrial Degreaser and the hose first.
  Reply
#3
(05-18-2021, 08:17 AM)ShortName Wrote:  Hi all,

I've got a mid-80s Everest Nova 6-speed freewheel in need of a service - disassembly, cleaning & reassembly. Anyone have experience with is model? I'm assuming the first cog(s) comes off to reveal the top cone ring, can anyone confirm? Pictures attached (hopefully).

It has come off a 1986 Wilier Triestina "Ramato" road bike that I'm currently restoring. I originally thought it was a Regina because it use the common 20 spline removal tool but, once I wiped-off some of the 30 year old grim, I could just decipher "Everest Nova Made in Italy". No other markings to be found so far - does this mean it's English/ISO threading? It came off an unmarked Miche Superfast hub that I'm looking to replace.

I'd also appreciate some more information on this freewheel and brand. Like, what was their reputation? Everest (and Caimi) don't make bicycle parts anymore, so were they just a minor player?

Apologies if this is the wrong section, let me know where I should post it.

PS: for those interested, I'm making the restoration into a little video series on youtube. Link to the intro video here: https://youtu.be/t-P6Y3TWayI

I have used Everest and Caimi FWs without any real issue. Very similar to Regina; they were regarded as quality components. Sun Tour FWs of the same era and before were much better; not necessarily in build quality, but certainly in design and function. The later Everest FWs had some cogs with bevelled teeth similar to Sun Tour's design.
I cannot remember how the individual cogs were mounted. I could tear one down, but my versions are much earlier (60s-70s) than yours and the assembly might be different.

I would completely breakdown the freewheel body to clean and overhaul it. If you "spray it down" or soak it with lubricants or cleaners, you may cause grit and debris to be introduced into the inner workings. A basic 2 pin removal tool is needed to overhaul the unit.

I am not sure why the cogs do not have the beveled teeth; it's possible that the FW has been reworked with replacement cogs at some point.

I assume that your FW has Italian threads to fit the hub since the WILIER company probably fitted all Italian components to the bike. Otherwise, it would have ISO threads.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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#4
(06-03-2021, 03:38 AM)Jesper Wrote:  I have used Everest and Caimi FWs without any real issue. Very similar to Regina; they were regarded as quality components. Sun Tour FWs of the same era and before were much better; not necessarily in build quality, by certainly in design and function. The later Everest FWs had some cogs with bevelled teeth similar to Sun Tour's design.
I cannot remember how the individual cogs were mounted. I could tear one down, but my versions are much earlier (60s-70s) than yours and the assembly might be different.

I would completely breakdown the freewheel body to clean and overhaul it. If you "spray it down" or soak it with lubricants or cleaners, you may cause grit and debris to be introduced into the inner workings. A basic 2 pin removal tool is needed to overhaul the unit.

I am not sure why the cogs do not have the beveled teeth; it's possible that the FW has been reworked with replacement cogs at some point.

I assume that your FW has Italian threads to fit the hub since the WILIER company probably fitted all Italian components to the bike. Otherwise, it would have ISO threads.

Cheers, thanks for the reply and info.
I've managed to get the first cog off using two chain whips. This revealed the two-pin lockring which I'll attempt to get loose another day. I'll film the whole procedure and post it to YouTube so anyone else trying to restore one of these freewheels will know what to do.
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#5
If you use a powerful enough cleaner, such as Industrial Purple, they contain very powerful solvents that will dissolve all the grime.

I am aware of the pinholes to disassemble the mech. Just for the record.
  Reply
#6
(06-04-2021, 09:10 PM)ReapThaWhirlwind Wrote:  If you use a powerful enough cleaner, such as Industrial Purple, they contain very powerful solvents that will dissolve all the grime.

I am aware of the pinholes to disassemble the mech. Just for the record.

I would certainly agree that a good solvent will break-down "grime", but the grit (silica, rock dust, metal debris, etc.) will not break-down and must be washed out of the mechanism when the unit is fully disassembled. Yes, some of that debris will rinse out without tearing down the unit, but that which remains is left in areas where it will continue to cause acelerated wear if the FW is not overhauled; and which could cause premature failure. If working on any FW (or any part) of unknown history (use and service) I would always recommend a complete break-down of the component(s) for thorough cleaning and lubrication if required. I regularly cycle on bikes with parts 40-50 years old; many be ridden for over 30 years by myself, and I have not had a properly maintained component malfunction aside from normal wear which was greatly reduced by completely overhauling parts during regular servicing. If you have a spare FW (I have many) you can always have a properly serviced unit ready to swap out when another needs overhaul. Thus, avoiding any cycling downtime for servicing a unit which may have become excessively soiled during use and requiring an overhaul. I tend to do FW, RD, and chain at the same time since they receive the same exposure to road debris, and frequently need more routine service than other areas (BB, headset, hubs, etc.); especially mtb's, and bikes that are frequently used off-road and/or are frequently used in adverse conditions.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#7
(06-08-2021, 12:07 PM)Jesper Wrote:  I would certainly agree that a good solvent will break-down "grime", but the grit (silica, rock dust, metal debris, etc.) will not break-down and must be washed out of the mechanism when the unit is fully disassembled. Yes, some of that debris will rinse out without tearing down the unit, but that which remains is left in areas where it will continue to cause acelerated wear if the FW is not overhauled; and which could cause premature failure. If working on any FW (or any part) of unknown history (use and service) I would always recommend a complete break-down of the component(s) for thorough cleaning and lubrication if required. I regularly cycle on bikes with parts 40-50 years old; many be ridden for over 30 years by myself, and I have not had a properly maintained component malfunction aside from normal wear which was greatly reduced by completely overhauling parts during regular servicing. If you have a spare FW (I have many) you can always have a properly serviced unit ready to swap out when another needs overhaul. Thus, avoiding any cycling downtime for servicing a unit which may have become excessively soiled during use and requiring an overhaul. I tend to do FW, RD, and chain at the same time since they receive the same exposure to road debris, and frequently need more routine service than other areas (BB, headset, hubs, etc.); especially mtb's, and bikes that are frequently used off-road and/or are frequently used in adverse conditions.

I thought it was a silly question coming from someone who is making videos about servicing freewheels.

Can't really justify all that though—just throw it away and buy a new one? Angel

Nothing beats brand new. Angel
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#8
@ShortName
I love it when people toss good parts that need a little cleaning and service. Helps out those of us who are trying to maintain classic rides with period parts. Please send your '80s and earlier parts to me. PM me and I'll give you an address and provide for shipping costs.

If you want an old frame with all new modern parts by all means do that. Many enthusiasts don't mind tinkering to keep things original when possible (or they have it done at a shop for them). New parts in general lower the value of a vintage bike if that was what you want it to be in the first place. There are still a lot of "NOS" parts (as well as barely used parts) out there if you need to replace something, but the costs are getting steep for that stuff, even for minor hardware bits.
If you are showing interest in learning about this area of cycling, and also providing video guidance to other potential vintage bike enthusiasts then I laud you for you efforts. It is certainly not silly for trying to learn for yourself or to help others; never mind reviving good parts that have years and possibly decades of life in them. Most of this is very time consuming (or costly) if you have the parts already. I can overhaul all parts on a bike in a day if I have my tools specific to the job. Most tools (various spanners, wrenches, removal tools, etc.) are inexpensive and can be used on more than one make; except specific proprietary tools (still fairly cost friendly).
Feel free to post a link to your service video on this site; I would certainly watch it.

Good luck and thank you for preserving some cycling history.

PS. I have a black anodized WILIER pantograghed stem (3t model?) if you are interested; need to check the size, but think it is fairly short (80mm or maybe less). I no longer have that frame, but I saved all those "throw away" parts; some now re-used, others waiting their turn.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#9
Hi all and anyone stumbling onto this thread looking to service one of these freewheels.

I just uploaded a video on the overhaul of this Everest Nova freewheel. Video link: https://youtu.be/VpfiXSMz_gA

It all went well and is working perfectly.

Basically, the first two (smallest) cogs unscrew which reveal the upper-cone which can be undone with a 2mm pin-spanner. Inside, there are 72 ball bearings - 31 top, 41 bottom - and two pawls.
It was pretty easy to overhaul, even though I made some mistakes along the way.

Thanks for all the advice.


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