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How to remove a Dork disc
#1
Hello everyone. Now I know what a dork disc is. But how do I remove it? Smile) With scissors? With a sharp knife? I have tender girl hands and I don't want to injure them on those sharp cogs or other edges.
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#2
(10-18-2020, 06:43 PM)Megster Wrote:  Hello everyone. Now I know what a dork disc is. But how do I remove it? Smile) With scissors? With a sharp knife? I have tender girl hands and I don't want to injure them on those sharp cogs or other edges.

Hey Megster,

The way to remove that disc is to remove the freewheel/gear cluster from the hub, or remove the cassette from the freehub (either of which require a removal tool specific to your hub, after which the disc will slide off (maybe unscrew). If it is a plastic one (without a metal center ring ) you may be able to "cut it out" from the rear hub. Never tried it so good luck if that is what you try. Technically if your rear derailleur is equipped with limiter screws (newer than 1960/1970 or so) and properly set -up you don't need the "spoke protection disc" since the derailleur will not be able to travel into the path of the spokes.. That disc primarily served a purpose on older shifting systems which had no means of stopping the shifting mechanism from interfering with the spokes. My 1930's bike requires one (it's missing!) as do many derailleur type bikes prior to the 60's. I never understood why these continue to be put on bikes even though they are not needed; but mistakes have happened (improper adjustment by: assemblers, shop mechanics, and/or owners) and I'm sure that they've saved people from damage and injuries even today. Like anything that moves you down the road, it is incumbent upon the user to familiarize themselves with their equipment and verify proper working order before riding/driving, etc,

Removal of the disc is a less than five minute job at a bike shop so you may want to save your self some time and effort. I can't see a shop charging very much (if anything) to do this work. I know that if you brought it to me I'd do it for free in hope that you'd provide future business to my shop. It's always nice to have a customer say, "Hey I need a spare tube, and by the way can you do this for me?" Letting the shop know you plan on spending a little at the start might get you some complimentary service in the end!
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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#3
If you have a blow torch ... Big Grin

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7KP39gUcEo
"Carbon is faster"
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#4
(10-19-2020, 12:50 AM)Jesper Wrote:  
(10-18-2020, 06:43 PM)Megster Wrote:  Hello everyone. Now I know what a dork disc is. But how do I remove it? Smile) With scissors? With a sharp knife? I have tender girl hands and I don't want to injure them on those sharp cogs or other edges.

Hey Megster,

The way to remove that disc is to remove the freewheel/gear cluster from the hub, or remove the cassette from the freehub (either of which require a removal tool specific to your hub, after which the disc will slide off (maybe unscrew). If it is a plastic one (without a metal center ring ) you may be able to "cut it out" from the rear hub. Never tried it so good luck if that is what you try. Technically if your rear derailleur is equipped with limiter screws (newer than 1960/1970 or so) and properly set -up you don't need the "spoke protection disc" since the derailleur will not be able to travel into the path of the spokes.. That disc primarily served a purpose on older shifting systems which had no means of stopping the shifting mechanism from interfering with the spokes. My 1930's bike requires one (it's missing!) as do many derailleur type bikes prior to the 60's. I never understood why these continue to be put on bikes even though they are not needed; but mistakes have happened (improper adjustment by: assemblers, shop mechanics, and/or owners) and I'm sure that they've saved people from damage and injuries even today. Like anything that moves you down the road, it is incumbent upon the user to familiarize themselves with their equipment and verify proper working order before riding/driving, etc,

Removal of the disc is a less than five minute job at a bike shop so you may want to save your self some time and effort. I can't see a shop charging very much (if anything) to do this work. I know that if you brought it to me I'd do it for free in hope that you'd provide future business to my shop. It's always nice to have a customer say, "Hey I need a spare tube, and by the way can you do this for me?" Letting the shop know you plan on spending a little at the start might get you some complimentary service in the end!


Thank youuu! Smile I will have to take it to a bike shop ... just in case.
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#5
i personally did it with a sharp kitchen knife
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