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Biking in the rain
#1
Hello.
I'm commuting by bicycle 2-3 times per week. Recently I got soaked unexpectedly and it made the rest of my day uncomfortable .. those damn forecasts :/

Anyway, can you give me secret tips and tricks for bike commuting in the rain? I'd be happy to avoid being wet and smelling bad for the rest of the day; also I don't want to take with me too much of "heavy gear" & clothing. Besides the obvious tip - fenders. My feet still got wet from the front wheel though.
Thanks Smile)
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#2
(09-30-2020, 07:54 PM)Megster Wrote:  Hello.
I'm commuting by bicycle 2-3 times per week. Recently I got soaked unexpectedly and it made the rest of my day uncomfortable .. those damn forecasts :/

Anyway, can you give me secret tips and tricks for bike commuting in the rain? I'd be happy to avoid being wet and smelling bad for the rest of the day; also I don't want to take with me too much of "heavy gear" & clothing. Besides the obvious tip - fenders. My feet still got wet from the front wheel though.
Thanks Smile)

I was hoping some commuter cyclists would chime in with ideas for you. I am generally dressed for racing or touring so I don't carry spare clothes unless overnight stay/camping. There are cycling shoe covers, some insulated for cold weather. I have simply put plastic bags over my shoes (cheap and easy to store). Gortex was always my go to material for water proof riding; wind breaker jackets and pants that are lightweight and take up little space when rolled up. Also, I would keep some spare clothes at work if you are regularly going to commute. Luckily I have shower facilities I can utilize but even without, I would keep a change of clothes and a towel handy (actually 2, one to wipe yourself down with and another for the bike).
Regarding fenders: they really only work for wet surfaces, with the precipitation already ended; if it is raining, fenders or not, you are getting wet without proper rain gear. If you buy cycling specific rain gear there is a good chance you'll pay more than if you just buy general use rain gear, although the bike stuff should fit comfortably when cycling whereas the general gear may feel a bit bulky and/or restrictive when actually cycling. You can get rain covers for helmets or try the plastic bag trick. Good luck!
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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#3
Thanks a lot Jesper Smile) Warm & waterproof shoe covers and keeping spare clothes at work are very good tips. I will have them at the top of my list! Unfortunately we don't have showers available...

Is there a significant difference between small and full length fenders? I might make another thread about this particular subject Smile
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#4
(10-21-2020, 07:20 PM)Megster Wrote:  Thanks a lot Jesper Smile) Warm & waterproof shoe covers and keeping spare clothes at work are very good tips. I will have them at the top of my list! Unfortunately we don't have showers available...

Is there a significant difference between small and full length fenders? I might make another thread about this particular subject Smile

Fender length does make a difference, but that also depends on tire tread surface and tire width. When I ride slicks (not track slicks) the water tends to adhere more and thus carry further up when you are riding; and your riding speed will also have an affect. I don't intentionally run smoother surface tires in the rain, only when caught more by surprise weather conditions. On my training/commuter bike I keep a "quick release" rear fender on hand that covers a range of tire widths, but I only put it on if I know that the conditions will be wet. Unfortunately, that fender looks horrible on my road bike (I think it was designed for BMX and mountain bikes), but I'd look horrible too covered in road grit! Another advantage of a long front fender is that it keeps the road grit from continually "sanding" away the finish on the lower part of the down tube and from accumulating/infiltrating around the bottom bracket and pedals, preserving their function over a longer period of time. I don't think I mentioned that I ride with "clipless" pedals; those cycling shoe covers have holes in the bottom to accommodate cleats (clipless and toeclip style shoes/cleats). My plastic bag "covers" still easily clip into my pedal without a problem and without having to make a hole due to the thin material (they get replaced after one use). They usually get a hole in them from getting in and out of the pedals, but it is okay, because if any water comes in through the top it can drain out (my shoes have holes in the sole for this same purpose). Block/platform pedals don't really affect them; but I don't use them when riding with toe cage style pedals because of the cage catching and tearing the bag.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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#5
Good timing, the other day Facebook feed showed me an add for these cycling pants (they have named them legs jacket?). They have them on clearance, only $83.

https://vear.me/collections/all
Focus Mares AL 105
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