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Trek 6500 ZX Update
#1
   

Hi all, for the past few years I've been riding a Trek 6500 ZX from around 1999-2001. I did some basic tune-ups on as well as replacing the wheels with the help of my local bike shop after getting it for free from some folks who didn't use it much but took good care of it. It still rides very well with no issues aside from the occasional strange noise while shifting. That being said, I'm looking to replace the entire drive train (Currently a 3x7 21 speed) with a 1x11 system and to add disc brakes. Would it even be possible/cost-effective to add these new parts given the age of the bike, or would I be better off riding it as is and saving up for a new bike?

Specs
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#2
(04-04-2020, 07:35 PM)Guz Wrote:  Hi all, for the past few years I've been riding a Trek 6500 ZX from around 1999-2001. I did some basic tune-ups on as well as replacing the wheels with the help of my local bike shop after getting it for free from some folks who didn't use it much but took good care of it. It still rides very well with no issues aside from the occasional strange noise while shifting. That being said, I'm looking to replace the entire drive train (Currently a 3x7 21 speed) with a 1x11 system and to add disc brakes. Would it even be possible/cost-effective to add these new parts given the age of the bike, or would I be better off riding it as is and saving up for a new bike?

Specs
Is the bike frame steel or aluminum? If it's aluminum, forget about putting an 11-speed freewheel/cassette on it. The frame would have to be spread wider to take it, and you'd need a longer axle. You can crack an aluminum frame by spreading it. Test the frame with a magnet to see what it's made of. I just looked at your specs. It's an aluminum frame.

For disc brakes you'd need different hubs that will take the discs. This means a rebuild of the wheels. Then you'd need to mount the calipers, somehow. You'd probably need a bike shop to do all that for you. The total could cost more than the bike is worth if they have to rebuild the wheels and modify the frame for 11-speed. Perhaps take it to a bike shop and get their advice. It's more than I'd care to get into on an older bike. Saving up for the bike you want sounds like a better idea.
If I knew how to ride a bike properly, I'd do it every time.
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