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frame damage
#1
a new one on me[Image: bustedbike.jpg]]
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#2
Shocked 
Oh wow, how did this happen??
Autobahn
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#3
I am sure it was a slow progression of alloy fatigue, it is a friend of mines bike. He commutes daily, in fact I have never seen him drive a car. He was merely pulling away from a stop light when it failed.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#4
Right... "I was just riding along when" Wink
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#5
(08-09-2019, 08:09 PM)Joe_W Wrote:  Right... "I was just riding along when" Wink
Yep, Joe. that is exactly how it went. 20 yrs of daily commuting. The guy is the biggest cycling advocate in our city, has been for over 30yrs. He lives, eats breathes, and shits bicycles. He lays down more miles on a bicycle in one year than most people ride in 10yrs. It just goes to show there is a life expectancy to an aluminum frame and this was ridden enough to bring out the fatigue factor. He is an X shop owner in the area, builder and ace bicycle mechanic bar none. I am not a big fan of aluminum bicycles myself. though I do have some, My full sprung 1990 Mongoose AMP. my 1995 Mongoose IBOC Comp (bonded), and 1989 Miyata SkyRunner also billet and bonded alloy framed. 1994 Barracuda welded aluminum.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#6
(I was just kidding... That phrase is probably the most often used one when bringing a bike to the Lbs)

Sounds like a cool guy! Makes me glad the new frame I bought is steel, though...
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#7
(08-09-2019, 12:27 PM)Painkiller Wrote:  a new one on me[Image: bustedbike.jpg]]
There's some stuff you can spray inside the seat tube, but who thinks to do that? Condensate can be a killer as it silently attacks the metal as you ride.
If I knew how to ride a bike properly, I'd do it every time.
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#8
This made me a little scared! What if it happens to my mountain bike .... when I'm speeding downhill with 35mph? Can this happen to newer bikes with alloy @Painkiller?
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#9
Sad part about it, the answer is yes, The fatigue effect of alloy vs. steel is Alloy will go in an instant where steel will go in a slower progression. Just inspect alloy once in a a while but this is rare, though it does happen.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#10
(01-28-2020, 12:19 PM)Painkiller Wrote:  Just inspect alloy once in a a while

How does one do that Huh
Sorry, I am still new to these things
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#11
Gotta hate that! That is what happens sometimes. We have seen a few come into the shop with fatigue fractures but nowhere near as many as the carbon frames.

Look it over with a good light. usually you will see a crack or something that just doesn't look right. Can then inspect closer. Could see bubbles in paint ect.
Nobody ever said "I wish I would have gotten less of a bike!"

Cervelo S5
Cannondale F29 1 alloy Lefty
Trek X-01 Crossbike
2017 Trek Farley 7
71 Ral Professional
72 Ral International
73 Ral Grand Sports
73 Ral Competition
74 Ral Super course
74 Ral Granprix
74 Paramount
2017 Trek Domane SLR 6

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#12
(01-29-2020, 10:36 PM)bibimbap Wrote:  
(01-28-2020, 12:19 PM)Painkiller Wrote:  Just inspect alloy once in a a while

How does one do that Huh
Sorry, I am still new to these things
Let me re phrase this a tad, Anytime a bicycle is being used to its fullest, no matter what the frame is made of, it should be inspected to make sure it is ready for the task at hand. This is a visual inspection and component check to make sure all is smooth and operating as intended and a visual check for any damage to the frame/fork/bars/seat/post/rims/grips etc.... When inspecting frames/bars/seat post and such, your bike should be clean enough to detect any cracking or micro fissures. Strange cracks in paint near or around stress areas and joints are a sign too. This also includes proper bearing preload and set on headsets no matter the style. And also Bottom bracket and peadals. If you are the exception that takes your bicycle to the limits, then it is up to you to make sure that it is 'tight and right" and a capable level of machine to get you through it safe.
I am old, I know not how old you are or what you do to or with bicycles. But let me say this, My golden rule has always been. Before i ever let a bicycle leave my shop, it will be race ready. The reason for this is.. no matter how good or wild or crazy or daring or fast I think I am, I know for a fact there are many that can push a bicycle to even more limits to the imaginable.
With that said, put your life in your hands not somebody elses if you can. learn to be your own wrench, learn what to look for, and you will do well.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#13
Thank you both for advice & wise words!! I have maintained "everything will be alllllright" attitude towards bikes and maintenance, however this made an impact
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#14
(01-31-2020, 11:06 PM)Painkiller Wrote:  With that said, put your life in your hands not somebody elses if you can. learn to be your own wrench, learn what to look for, and you will do well.
I feel vindicated by your advice.

Following the purchase of three new bikes from a bike shop in business since 1979, and tolerating five botch jobs from their 'professional' mechanic, I decided to do my own wrenching. I'm not new to wrenching, anyway, having kept my own cars (and other people's) in good shape for nearly fifty years. How much more difficult could it be working on a bike? Well, it's different, and does require careful attention to any kind of work done on it.

The final straw that caused me to leave that LBS was the rude mechanic. He had a tendency to snap when it wasn't called for. He also fed me wrong information on two occasions. I wanted to buy two sets of replaceable brake pads with holders but the shop had only one pair. They ordered the others, or so they said. Three months after placing the order, I happened to be riding by the shop and decided to stop in and see what the brake pads situation was. All I asked was: "Any news on the brake pads?" The mechanic spun on his heels, threw a hand up in the air as he walked away and shouted, "We'll call you when they come in!" With that he disappeared into the workshop. I stood there, stunned for a minute, then walked out. I was humiliated, and I decided that I would not ask again; I'd wait until they called me. I had ordered them in February, and I waited until October before I got them online. The phone call never came.

Apart from the three bikes, I bought all my parts and extras there. I did contact the owner, one time, to gently alert him to one of the botch jobs, and suggested he take an interest in what leaves his shop. He wrote back with a bunch of nonsense that didn't address the issue I raised.

In effect, the mechanic did me a favor by causing me to dump them as a bike shop. I've bought tools one at a time, and I've watched tons of videos on how to do certain things when I'm not totally sure. I've replaced a free hub on my fat bike after having to buy a 12mm hex wrench online to remove the old one. I replaced the headset on my fat bike. I replaced cup and cone bearings with a cartridge BB on my hybrid bike. Heck, I even trued the wheels on it after I bought a truing stand and spoke tension gauge.

Start off with small things, and when those are successful, and confidence is gained, move on to bigger things. If that doesn't work, find a good bike shop to fix what ya broke.
If I knew how to ride a bike properly, I'd do it every time.
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