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New components
#1
Hi everyone! I'm new to this forum, but I'm very excited already, having read a lot of interesting information and opinions.
I would like to ask for your help regarding some new components I'm deciding on buying.

My bike is a 2009 Merida MATTS TFS 300, full Deore (supposedly).
Its main components are:
Rear Derailleur: M531
Front Derailleur: M531
Cassette: HG50-9
Chain: HG53

I'm thinking on buying these new components, to update and maybe upgrade it a little:
Rear Derailleur: M592
Front Derailleur: M590
Cassette: HG61-9 (11-32)
Chain: HG93 (114)
Front Hub: M595
Rear Hub: M595
Crankset: M590 (22.32.44)

So I'd like to ask you specifically about:
1) Do you think this is a reasonable list of new components? (is it balanced?)
2) Regarding the front derailleur: is it advisable to change it along the other components? (or it has a much slower rate of attrition?)

Thank you in advance, and I hope to remain in touch with this great community.
  Reply
#2
Why are you changing anything?

The only item that needs replacing on a regular basis is the chain - which should be replaced base on stretch (and very rarely a stiff link, if it is not lubricated properly). If the chain becomes stretched too far, it will damage the cogs on the cassette, and eventually the chain rings.

Rear derailleurs need to be replaced if they get smashed into something, but if that does not happen, and they are properly lubricated, they will last decades or more. The rollers are replaceable in most.

I have changed freewheels and cassettes to get different ratios - and always replace the chain at the same time.

Except for a ratio change, you will not feel any difference riding. If you are doing this for cosmetics; it is fine.
Nigel
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#3
Thank you for your answer nfmisso.
I forgot to add that the chainrings and sprockets are already presenting "shark teeth" due to improper chain replacement policy.
In addition, I'm returning to my home country, where these components are hard to find (or extremely expensive), so I want to have a spare group to change when the time comes.
My second question was made bearing in mind that I can't appreciate any signs of wear in the front derailleur, so maybe -I thought- even in my hypothetical scenario it won't need replacement in many years.
  Reply
#4
Apart from chainrings, chain, cassette/sprockets, brake and gear cables and brake blocks, most bicycle components will last for decades unless damaged in a fall. Front and rear derailleurs do wear, but you can replace the jockey wheels on rear derailleurs.

If you're looking to upgrade, you might consider a whole new bike, with better components fitted from the outset as this can sometimes work out cheaper or better value than the cost of upgrading lots of components, which are more expensive to buy separately than they are as part of a whole bike. You can either sell the old bike to put towards the cost of a new bike, or keep it as a winter bike so you can keep your new one for "best".
  Reply
#5
Just a thought, if you are picking up things don't forget a new pump even if you don't need it right now. Xerxes is right if consumable materials are lower priced then where your home is stock up to which I mean tires, tubes, new saddle (seat), and if you don't build your own maybe a pair of wheels if the price is reasonable. Oh and grab me a coffee too , just kidding on that coffee Wink.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
  Reply
#6
Thanks guys, great advice! I have already dropped the 2 derailleurs and I'm buying new jockey wheels.
Do you think that the HG93 chain (instead of the HG53) could "bite" my sprockets and chainrings? I mean, it's tougher than the other one.
And the coffee is on its way Bill Wink
  Reply
#7
Go with the lowest "speed" chains that will work. For example if you have an 8 speed cassette and RD, go with an 8 speed chain, not a 9 or 10 speed chain. The higher the number of speeds of a chain, the weaker it is, and the sooner it will stretch.
Nigel
  Reply
#8
Thank you all for your ideas! I have modified my shopping cart in consequence.
  Reply


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