Have questions or want to discuss cycling? Join Now or Sign In to participate in the BikeRide community.

New: Take Part in the June Giveaway to Win the Kazam Buddi 20" Aluminum Trailer Bike


Very sorry for not searching
#1
I know, search then ask questions. But right now, my bike is sole transport. It's a Walmart bike, Next Power climber. I have a broken spoke and took off the wheel to try to remove the rear cassette. I don't have special tools, and could not get it off, nor did it look like I could. My fear is it's mass produced and the wheel is stuffed. I can't get the spoke out without the cassette coming off. With no help from the manny, what are my options?

Replace the wheel? OK, but how do I know what to ask for? It's an 18 speed gearing. I'll get my hands all greasy, but damned if I can figure this one out.

Thanks guys and girls and sorry for not searching for the answer first.

Mike in NY
  Reply
#2
There are special tools required from removing your cassette. Your best bet is to take it to a bike shop to have it removed. Otherwise you would have to buy or borrow the tools.
  Reply
#3
I got that. Did quite some work on my motorcycle. But I can't see how this comes off. Higher end bikes will be component based. Was just wondering if these cheaper bikes (paid 100US) are not based that way. Screw the wheel, replace it. I looked for split ring type retainers, and see no way how it comes off.
  Reply
#4
As RBurelli wrote: there are special tools for that. Most likely you have a freewheel. There is about a bajillion (well, I guess 5 common and 20 uncommon, but it feels more) different tools to do that, each one with a special pattern of splines to fit the different types of freewheel. Without one you cannot get it off. (well, unless you remove the axle and then try to clamp it from the inside, but that is really just the last resort). A bike shop will have the correct tool. Removing the wheel takes a minute and costs (at my local bike shop) "put something into the tip jar for coffee".

Replacing a spoke is not magic. However, I would have the wheel tensioned and stress relieved as the department store "bikes" have shoddily built wheels. You can build a sturdy, halfway decent wheel with the components, it just takes more time (and would drive up the price).

Higher end bikes have a freehub and a cassette. To remove the cassette you need yet another special tool.
  Reply
#5
Your bike has a freewheel, not a cassette. These are two different animals and require different tools and procedures. And a significant (?) investment in tools.

Personally, I would replace the bike with a modestly-priced good bike (new or used). I realize that may be financially difficult, but in the long run less repair and replacement cost and safer. One of the problems with a department store bike is you can spend more correcting it than you paid for it in the first place. If you do get a new wheel, try to get a double wall rim (will cost more). I think most shops charge around $20 to replace a broken spoke...so realistically, if you figure on more broken spokes on the current wheel, you're looking at a lot of cost in the future.
(06-12-2012, 11:41 AM)Joe_W Wrote:  As RBurelli wrote: there are special tools for that. Most likely you have a freewheel. There is about a bajillion (well, I guess 5 common and 20 uncommon, but it feels more) different tools to do that, each one with a special pattern of splines to fit the different types of freewheel. Without one you cannot get it off. (well, unless you remove the axle and then try to clamp it from the inside, but that is really just the last resort). A bike shop will have the correct tool. Removing the wheel takes a minute and costs (at my local bike shop) "put something into the tip jar for coffee".

Replacing a spoke is not magic. However, I would have the wheel tensioned and stress relieved as the department store "bikes" have shoddily built wheels. You can build a sturdy, halfway decent wheel with the components, it just takes more time (and would drive up the price).

Higher end bikes have a freehub and a cassette. To remove the cassette you need yet another special tool.

Apparently I am an internet mind reader Smile
  Reply
#6
The freewheel requires park tools FR-1 I believe. If you could get a picture of the freewheel I could definitely tell you which one it is. Or as said above buy a used wheel from a bike and they should change it over at no additional cost, I know I would for my customer!
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
  Reply
#7
Thanks folks. I had looked up earlier to do this, and it was all freehweel. I looked to hold the cassette back and rotate it forward (or vice as it were), but it wasn't happening. So, guess that wasn't it. Bike shop here I come. Can't afford the money, but my footsies would love it!! Thanks all!!!

Mike
  Reply


Forum Jump:

[-]
10 Latest Posts
What did your first bicycle mean to you?
Today 05:50 AM
Fat bikes for ever..
Today 02:28 AM
Anybody watch on YouTube Global Mountain...
Today 01:52 AM
Trike riders are good citizens
Today 01:50 AM
Intro
Yesterday 10:58 PM
Moving from 26" to 29" - Did you have an...
Yesterday 08:28 PM
Tour de France 2024
Yesterday 05:40 PM
Off-season hill climbing training tip
Yesterday 12:20 PM
Modern Tire Width Preference
07-10-2024 03:22 PM
Community Discussion Cycling Myths
07-09-2024 06:12 AM

[-]
Join BikeRide on Strava
Feel free to join if you are on Strava: www.strava.com/clubs/bikeridecom

[-]
Top 5 Posters This Month
no avatar 1. Jesper
33 posts
no avatar 2. Flowrider
21 posts
no avatar 3. GirishH
18 posts
no avatar 4. meamoantonio
14 posts
no avatar 5. Dusan
11 posts