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Creaky rear wheel when peddling
#1
I have developed a creaky rear wheel creaking and cracking when peddling even at slight pressure although it is a little intermittent being worse after riding for a while. Sometimes it is ok until I peddle firmly and then it will creak at any pressure. Sometimes if I freewheel it stops for a for peddles. Last night it stopped a couple of times when I changed gear. No creaks when freewheeling. I know it is the wheel as I tried a different wheel last night and it was fine. Could it be a worn freehub or cassette? Or spokes maybe? I tried grease where the spokes cross. Everything outside is lubricated with gt85. It has done about 2000 miles and the chain is only very slightly stretched.

Anyone any ideas or similar experiences?

thanks

Chris
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#2
I've had a creaky back wheel due to a loose spoke.
Go round all the spokes and check that they feel the same tension.
The drive side spokes (sprocket side) will be tighter than the non-drive side, so don't confuse this?

Another possibility is the wheel bearing may need adjusting/greasing?
Ride hard or ride home alone!
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#3
(04-14-2010, 06:14 AM)cyclerUK Wrote:  I've had a creaky back wheel due to a loose spoke.
Go round all the spokes and check that they feel the same tension.
The drive side spokes (spocket side) will be tighter than the non-drive side, so don't confuse this?

Another possibility is the wheel bearing may need adjusting/greasing?

Thanks for the reply,
I have checked spokes and all fine (I think). But just got a friend to listen for the noise. With the bike stationary and brakes hard on I pressed on the peddles to make the sound. My friend listened and noticed the cassette visibly moved with the chain pressure whilst the wheel didn't. So the freehub is trying to jump it would seem? I am thinking I need to get some tools to investigate inside.

cheers

Chris
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#4
"Thanks for the reply,
I have checked spokes and all fine (I think). But just got a friend to listen for the noise. With the bike stationary and brakes hard on I pressed on the peddles to make the sound. My friend listened and noticed the cassette visibly moved with the chain pressure whilst the wheel didn't."

Bingo! I just had the same symptoms, and after a day dedicated to the task of "find it," my shop guy took apart the rear cassette, and the freewheel hub body was the culprit.
The cog discs and their spacers all fit on the splines of the freewheel hub, but the hub body is cast aluminum (light weight), while the discs are steel. The difference in material hardness means that the discs act like knives and they start to cut into the relative butter of the splines of the hub. What your friend saw wasn't the entire cassette moving, but just the cog the chain was on. When you take the discs off, you will see the bites on the rear-facing surfaces of the splines. Solution? At least for Shimano, it is a new hub body, about $50, I'm told. Plus installation, of course. Ask if you can watch the process. You will learn a lot.

Hope this helps.
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#5
(04-21-2010, 12:22 PM)mvwanderson Wrote:  "Thanks for the reply,
I have checked spokes and all fine (I think). But just got a friend to listen for the noise. With the bike stationary and brakes hard on I pressed on the peddles to make the sound. My friend listened and noticed the cassette visibly moved with the chain pressure whilst the wheel didn't."

Bingo! I just had the same symptoms, and after a day dedicated to the task of "find it," my shop guy took apart the rear cassette, and the freewheel hub body was the culprit.
The cog discs and their spacers all fit on the splines of the freewheel hub, but the hub body is cast aluminum (light weight), while the discs are steel. The difference in material hardness means that the discs act like knives and they start to cut into the relative butter of the splines of the hub. What your friend saw wasn't the entire cassette moving, but just the cog the chain was on. When you take the discs off, you will see the bites on the rear-facing surfaces of the splines. Solution? At least for Shimano, it is a new hub body, about $50, I'm told. Plus installation, of course. Ask if you can watch the process. You will learn a lot.

Hope this helps.

Cheers for that. and as you said I took the cassette apart and after cleaning everything, as it was pretty filthy, I saw what you described in the aluminium freehub where the steel cogs have cut in! They weren't particularly big nicks on mine so I applied grease to the cleaned surfaces and re-installed everything. The bike is now quiet again, although it has clunked a couple of times when engaging so I am sure things aren't 100% According to wiggle, the suppliers, this is normal for an easton freehub and not a worry? I'm sure the story isn't over and imagine a new freehub may be a possibility sometime.

cheers
Chris
  Reply


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