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Non-Slip Cycling Shoe cover for exposed cleats
#1
I have been experimenting with a means of making my road bike shoes safer when walking about in stores, at home, etc.

After my first fall (late '80s) when wearing cleated bike shoes (fitted with LOOK cleats) I wanted to find a cheap/easy way to prevent inadvertent slipping while walking. This would not apply to recessed cleats as found on mtb/SPD style style shoes.

Glueing some very thin rubber to the bottom of the cleat worked, but was short-lived from a combination of both walking and cycling where it became easily separated with little usage time. Also, reduces foot "float" in the pedal, and makes clipping-in more diffucult (especially with newer cleats).

Years (a decade!) later LOOK themselves added some cheesy small rubber pads (see photo) integrated into the cleat, but it quickly wears away and the surface area was so small that it really provided very little purchase even when new.

Later, a company made slip-on covers for the cleat which was fine since it covers the entire surface of the cleat, but a bit a of pain in the butt if you were needed to fit them into a small tool bag with higher priority items.

Then I stumbled upon an idea when at work where we provide dispoable non-slip socks for our patients. They come in a variety of sizes (and colors), and definitely work when on your feet, but would they actually work for my intended purpose?
I finally got a pair of suitable size (XXL) that would pull over my shoes. They worked great and can be multi-purpose items. Big enough (for me) to use as an over-glove hand warmer, and if you cut away a small portion on the side without the "tread" you can use them as foot warmers while being clipped-in. It's not a concern if they wear out because being 2-sided you can yse them for longer than if single-sided. They are easy to carry having them securely held between the saddle and tool bag, around the frame fir storage and/or to protect your frame when propping it against a pole or bike stand.
With me lace-up shoes they slip over the shoe quite easily; a little harder with straps and ratchets; but still not hard or time consuming to use.

They check off every box and then some:
-cheap
-durable enough for the job and cost
-versatile; fits nearly any cleat
-easily stored
-muffles the "tap dancing" sound
-and most importantly; effective.


   


Attached Files Image(s)
   
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#2
(01-14-2024, 08:49 PM)Jesper Wrote:  I have been experimenting with a means of making my road bike shoes safer when walking about in stores, at home, etc.

After my first fall (late '80s) when wearing cleated bike shoes (fitted with LOOK cleats) I wanted to find a cheap/easy way to prevent inadvertent slipping while walking. This would not apply to recessed cleats as found on mtb/SPD style style shoes.

Glueing some very thin rubber to the bottom of the cleat worked, but was short-lived from a combination of both walking and cycling where it became easily separated with little usage time. Also, reduces foot "float" in the pedal, and makes clipping-in more diffucult (especially with newer cleats).

Years (a decade!) later LOOK themselves added some cheesy small rubber pads (see photo) integrated into the cleat, but it quickly wears away and the surface area was so small that it really provided very little purchase even when new.

Later, a company made slip-on covers for the cleat which was fine since it covers the entire surface of the cleat, but a bit a of pain in the butt if you were needed to fit them into a small tool bag with higher priority items.

Then I stumbled upon an idea when at work where we provide dispoable non-slip socks for our patients. They come in a variety of sizes (and colors), and definitely work when on your feet, but would they actually work for my intended purpose?
I finally got a pair of suitable size (XXL) that would pull over my shoes. They worked great and can be multi-purpose items. Big enough (for me) to use as an over-glove hand warmer, and if you cut away a small portion on the side without the "tread" you can use them as foot warmers while being clipped-in. It's not a concern if they wear out because being 2-sided you can yse them for longer than if single-sided. They are easy to carry having them securely held between the saddle and tool bag, around the frame fir storage and/or to protect your frame when propping it against a pole or bike stand.
With me lace-up shoes they slip over the shoe quite easily; a little harder with straps and ratchets; but still not hard or time consuming to use.

They check off every box and then some:
-cheap
-durable enough for the job and cost
-versatile
-easily stored
-muffles the "tap dancing" sound
-and most importantly; effective.

I have an idea, Socks usually allow sliding that's why we put socks on while practicing how to moonwalk (still cant do it properly after XX years of practicing with socks haha) if you put a some sort of thin rubber on the sole you'll get better traction out of it and even less chances of slipping.
  Reply
#3
(01-17-2024, 09:59 PM)meamoantonio Wrote:  
(01-14-2024, 08:49 PM)Jesper Wrote:  I have been experimenting with a means of making my road bike shoes safer when walking about in stores, at home, etc.

After my first fall (late '80s) when wearing cleated bike shoes (fitted with LOOK cleats) I wanted to find a cheap/easy way to prevent inadvertent slipping while walking. This would not apply to recessed cleats as found on mtb/SPD style style shoes.

Glueing some very thin rubber to the bottom of the cleat worked, but was short-lived from a combination of both walking and cycling where it became easily separated with little usage time. Also, reduces foot "float" in the pedal, and makes clipping-in more diffucult (especially with newer cleats).

Years (a decade!) later LOOK themselves added some cheesy small rubber pads (see photo) integrated into the cleat, but it quickly wears away and the surface area was so small that it really provided very little purchase even when new.

Later, a company made slip-on covers for the cleat which was fine since it covers the entire surface of the cleat, but a bit a of pain in the butt if you were needed to fit them into a small tool bag with higher priority items.

Then I stumbled upon an idea when at work where we provide dispoable non-slip socks for our patients. They come in a variety of sizes (and colors), and definitely work when on your feet, but would they actually work for my intended purpose?
I finally got a pair of suitable size (XXL) that would pull over my shoes. They worked great and can be multi-purpose items. Big enough (for me) to use as an over-glove hand warmer, and if you cut away a small portion on the side without the "tread" you can use them as foot warmers while being clipped-in. It's not a concern if they wear out because being 2-sided you can yse them for longer than if single-sided. They are easy to carry having them securely held between the saddle and tool bag, around the frame fir storage and/or to protect your frame when propping it against a pole or bike stand.
With me lace-up shoes they slip over the shoe quite easily; a little harder with straps and ratchets; but still not hard or time consuming to use.

They check off every box and then some:
-cheap
-durable enough for the job and cost
-versatile; fits nearly any cleats
-easily stored
-muffles the "tap dancing" sound
-inexpensive.
-and most importantly; effective.

1

I have an idea, Socks usually allow sliding that's why we put socks on while practicing how to moonwalk (still cant do it properly after XX years of practicing with socks haha) if you put a some sort of thin rubber on the sole you'll get better traction out of it and even less chances of slipping.

Carefully read my comment. These are not normal socks! They are ANTI-SLIP "socks" designed for hospital patients who either exhibit a fall hazard, or for patients in our operating theatre who may be woozy after anethesia. They do not slip on the floor, nor do they slide around on the shoe due to a snug fit. I have mentioned rubber used on the cleat which is the prime concern. Rubber affects the fit of the cleat in the pedal, and separates from the cleat after very little cycling and walking because it needs to be very thin to allow for proper cleat engagement into the pedal. On cycling shoes (old and new; not SPD style) with exposed cleats the sole of the shoe is not in contact with the ground except the heel when walking; and the cleats are not designed for walking. The cleat provides no purchase on smooth surfaces; much akin to walking on ice. The covers made for the cleats are bulky if riding with a standard saddle bag and take up too much space. Also, I would need 6 types of cleat covers (toe cage type-you cannot put a cover on these; Campagnolo C-Reccord and Pro Fit, Look delta, Time, Merckx, Shimano (road not SPD)). These anti-slip socks work for all of those cleats, are easy to store, etc. etc. I do not use Speedplay. Socks cost about $1.25 per pair, specific cleat covers cost about $10 to $15 per pair. As I said, the socks check all boxes when using for road bike cleat applications. Nothing else comes close.
   
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#4
I love it when we can find a new purpose to a tool or thing made for another.

While in Ecuador, I was trying to find a winter shoe cover that I had seen folks use during Boston's winter. We were supposed to ride through Cotopaxi and Chimbarazo, the tallest peaks in Ecuador.

I had no access to an outdoor gear shop and was looking for an inexpensive alternative. Fortunately, I found these rubber shoe covers that went over my hiking or riding shoes. These were inexpensive and readily available as they are used for cleaning purposes in industry or bathrooms.

I used mine not only when we were in the shadows of snow-capped peaks but also during downpours.

That's when I learned to explain to folks what my problem was instead of asking for a "shoe cover" because these rubber booties were their solution.
  Reply
#5
Also, LOOK Keo cleats wear out SO fast if you walk on them

Fortunately, LOOK sells handy covers. I don't leave home without them.
   

You can buy aftermarket covers a bit cheaper but I wouldn't call the LOOK originals expensive.

One of the things I love about SPDs is being able to wear 'regular'-ish shoes with the cleats recessed into soles that are great for walking. Decades ago, when I used to commuter 40 miles a day into that London, I rocked some super snazzy Vans with SPDs. An amazing number of trendy people asked where I got the shoes, not realising they were bike shoes.

Alas, SPDs aren't so good for road bikes or competition.

#goodtimes
  Reply
#6
(01-31-2024, 01:01 PM)enkei Wrote:  Also, LOOK Keo cleats wear out SO fast if you walk on them

Fortunately, LOOK sells handy covers. I don't leave home without them.


You can buy aftermarket covers a bit cheaper but I wouldn't call the LOOK originals expensive.

One of the things I love about SPDs is being able to wear 'regular'-ish shoes with the cleats recessed into soles that are great for walking. Decades ago, when I used to commuter 40 miles a day into that London, I rocked some super snazzy Vans with SPDs. An amazing number of trendy people asked where I got the shoes, not realising they were bike shoes.

Alas, SPDs aren't so good for road bikes or competition.

#goodtimes

I have those covers for my Look "D" type cleats; no Keos yet. They work fine, but do not fit in my tool kit bag; nearly takes up one tube's worth of space. Do the Keo cleats wear faster than the older "D" cleats? My regular Look cleats seem to last a couple years or more excepting when I use for commuting which cuts the life down by about 25%.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#7
(01-31-2024, 03:13 PM)Jesper Wrote:  
(01-31-2024, 01:01 PM)enkei Wrote:  Also, LOOK Keo cleats wear out SO fast if you walk on them

Fortunately, LOOK sells handy covers. I don't leave home without them.


You can buy aftermarket covers a bit cheaper but I wouldn't call the LOOK originals expensive.

One of the things I love about SPDs is being able to wear 'regular'-ish shoes with the cleats recessed into soles that are great for walking. Decades ago, when I used to commuter 40 miles a day into that London, I rocked some super snazzy Vans with SPDs. An amazing number of trendy people asked where I got the shoes, not realising they were bike shoes.

Alas, SPDs aren't so good for road bikes or competition.

#goodtimes

I have those covers for my Look "D" type cleats; no Keos yet. They work fine, but do not fit in my tool kit bag; nearly takes up one tube's worth of space. Do the Keo cleats wear faster than the older "D" cleats? My regular Look cleats seem to last a couple years or more excepting when I use for commuting which cuts the life down by about 25%.

I've not used LOOK D cleats, so I can't compare them. I'm ashamed to say I don't ride enough to be an authority on LOOK Keo cleat wear but I have to say, they do seem to wear quickly if I forget to fit the covers. Can you not stash the covers in a pocket? They're not that big or heavy. In fact, they just about the only thing you can carry in the back of a cycling jersey that won't add to your injury if you come off your bike.
  Reply
#8
That is highly amusing.

I doubt I would notice this if I saw someone in the store, but maybe.
  Reply
#9
(02-06-2024, 12:18 AM)ReapThaWhirlwind Wrote:  That is highly amusing.

I doubt I would notice this if I saw someone in the store, but maybe.

I don't understand this, LOL. Did I miss something?
  Reply
#10
(01-31-2024, 07:50 PM)enkei Wrote:  I've not used LOOK D cleats, so I can't compare them. I'm ashamed to say I don't ride enough to be an authority on LOOK Keo cleat wear but I have to say, they do seem to wear quickly if I forget to fit the covers. Can you not stash the covers in a pocket? They're not that big or heavy. In fact, they just about the only thing you can carry in the back of a cycling jersey that won't add to your injury if you come off your bike.

I rarely wear cycling jerseys that most people equate with cycling. If I do, I am not getting off the bike except for emergencies.
Still, I never like having stuff in the rear pockets and many of my classic "non-plastic" shirts do not have pockets so not an option regardless.
Saddle bag 5"x3.25"x2" tube, lever, patch kit, rubber gloves, and some paper money. No room for cleat covers.
                   
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply
#11
(02-10-2024, 04:03 PM)Jesper Wrote:  
(01-31-2024, 07:50 PM)enkei Wrote:  I've not used LOOK D cleats, so I can't compare them. I'm ashamed to say I don't ride enough to be an authority on LOOK Keo cleat wear but I have to say, they do seem to wear quickly if I forget to fit the covers. Can you not stash the covers in a pocket? They're not that big or heavy. In fact, they just about the only thing you can carry in the back of a cycling jersey that won't add to your injury if you come off your bike.

I rarely wear cycling jerseys that most people equate with cycling. If I do, I am not getting off the bike except for emergencies.
Still, I never like having stuff in the rear pockets and many of my classic "non-plastic" shirts do not have pockets so not an option regardless.
Saddle bag 5"x3.25"x2" tube, lever, patch kit, rubber gloves, and some paper money. No room for cleat covers.

I hear ya and totally respect the ascetic approach. Maybe swap from butyl tube to TPU to make room for covers?
  Reply
#12
(02-10-2024, 05:03 PM)enkei Wrote:  
(02-10-2024, 04:03 PM)Jesper Wrote:  
(01-31-2024, 07:50 PM)enkei Wrote:  I've not used LOOK D cleats, so I can't compare them. I'm ashamed to say I don't ride enough to be an authority on LOOK Keo cleat wear but I have to say, they do seem to wear quickly if I forget to fit the covers. Can you not stash the covers in a pocket? They're not that big or heavy. In fact, they just about the only thing you can carry in the back of a cycling jersey that won't add to your injury if you come off your bike.

I rarely wear cycling jerseys that most people equate with cycling. If I do, I am not getting off the bike except for emergencies.
Still, I never like having stuff in the rear pockets and many of my classic "non-plastic" shirts do not have pockets so not an option regardless.
Saddle bag 5"x3.25"x2" tube, lever, patch kit, rubber gloves, and some paper money. No room for cleat covers.

I hear ya and totally respect the ascetic approach. Maybe swap from butyl tube to TPU to make room for covers?

If I am touring or doing on/off road rides I have a much larger saddle pack that can be zipped-up when extra space is not needed; even then in its "collapsed" mode it would be twice as large as my mini pack. I do need to have 2 tubes for my lo-pro (700c & 24") so the TPU might fit that need and allow me to keep a small pack. I am not worried about weight concerns regarding tubes so space is my only concern. Still the cleat covers cannot compete regarding versalility and cost compared to the sock alternative. If my hands get cold I have some "mitts" onboard. I just don't think cleat covers will be able to help there. That is important in long distance touring; having items that are multipurpose and save space and weight over having individual items for every purpose. I am going to experiment with using those socks for colder environmemt cycling since my winter in north Florida has been getting colder in recent years and retirement will put me in my northern residence permanently and I want to see if they are good in sub-freezing temperature as an addition layer over my standard full finger gloves, as well as extra cushioning.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply


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