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Where to start?
#1
Greetings all,

As a novice to the world of cycling, I seek guidance on where to begin my journey. The idea of obtaining a road bike and exploring nature's paths intrigues me, yet I am uncertain of what features to seek in a suitable bicycle or the necessary gear to acquire. Additionally, the thought of navigating through busy traffic on the roads makes me uneasy. Are there any suggestions for remaining safe while cycling on urban streets? I would greatly appreciate any advice for a beginner like myself.

Thank you in advance for your assistance.
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#2
I am a strong advocate of mountain bikes for all around riding. They are able to navigate any trail or road surface presented to them. For a novice, this is important and does not pigeon hole a person into one or two environments. I commuted, raced, and did 90 mile day rides on one mountain bike and was very pleased and happy with it.
You can go down the rabbit hole chasing features and benefits, but be honest with yourself and avoid that nonsense. KISS, keep it simple. Get something that fits your body well, and fits the budget. The rest will take care of itself.

I no longer to any single track riding through the woods, but I do find myself on unpaved roads as well as bike paths and paved roads and now ride a touring bike.
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#3
(01-29-2023, 07:18 PM)jeffg Wrote:  I am a strong advocate of mountain bikes for all around riding. They are able to navigate any trail or road surface presented to them.

I agree.
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#4
As much as I love mountain bikes, for strictly urban riding, I wouldn't recommend them. If you're like me who goes overkill on mods and kits, the bike becomes too heavy and all the extra travel in suspensions is pretty much useless on paved roads (maybe if you hit a pothole they're useful). Plus, mountain bikes can be a little hard to maintain for newbies. I recommend a nice hybrid bike. It will keep you upright and comfortable while riding and won't cost as much as an MTB. 8 speed 12- 32 cassette will be fine for daily commutes.
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#5
I do find it a bit odd that someone who works at a bicycle company ("business developer at Hygge Best Electric Bike Company. Delilah has a wealth of experience in the electric bike industry") was not able to obtain advice at her place of work regarding what type of bicycle best satisfies her needs. Just sayin'.

As far as keeping safe on the streets; stay off the streets. Considerate and attentive motorists are the main requirement for safety when riding on roads also occupied by motor vehicles.
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#6
If you have bike paths in your city I’d recommend just going for a few hours ride on days off and get comfortable with riding. Then once you do that for a while and are more comfortable you can start commuting to work etc. Also if you don’t have bike path where you live you can always try riding gravel or off the beaten path roads where there isn’t much traffic. Just to get your barrings and go on some adventures finding cool places that you wouldn’t normally ever see.

Bike wise you can just ride what ever draws your attention, like if you think road biking seems interesting buy a road bike or if mountain biking fancies your interest go that route 🤘🏼

PS a smaller more agile road bike sounds like a good fit, as a smaller road bike is easier to control and isn’t as scary
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#7
My advice would be to go out on your own a few times first, rather than with someone else - especially someone who is already 'experienced'. You don't want someone dictating your pace for you, although his advice on the ride may or may not be useful. If you haven't ridden for 10 years (and assuming you don't do any mostbet aviator tricks other 'regular' exercise) then 20-30min rides on flattish terrain on your own - and at your own pace - would be my suggestion as a first step.
  Reply
#8
(01-29-2023, 07:18 PM)jeffg Wrote:  I am a strong advocate of mountain bikes for all around riding. They are able to navigate any trail or road surface presented to them. For a novice, this is important and does not pigeon hole a person into one or two environments. I commuted, raced, and did 90 mile day rides on one mountain bike and was very pleased and happy with it.
You can go down the rabbit hole chasing features and benefits, but be honest with yourself and avoid that nonsense. KISS, keep it simple. Get something that fits your body well, and fits the budget. The rest will take care of itself.

I no longer to any single track riding through the woods, but I do find myself on unpaved roads as well as bike paths and paved roads and now ride a touring bike.

Thank you for sharing your experience and insights on choosing a bike. It's great to hear that you have been happy with your mountain bike for commuting, racing, and long day rides. Your suggestion to keep it simple and choose a bike that fits your body well and budget is a good one. I also appreciate your perspective on switching to a touring bike for your current riding needs. It's important to find a bike that suits our changing needs and preferences.

(01-31-2023, 10:46 PM)aliccon Wrote:  My advice would be to go out on your own a few times first, rather than with someone else - especially someone who is already 'experienced'. You don't want someone dictating your pace for you, although his advice on the ride may or may not be useful. If you haven't ridden for 10 years (and assuming you don't do any other 'regular' exercise) then 20-30min rides on flattish terrain on your own - and at your own pace - would be my suggestion as a first step.

Thank you for the advice on starting a cycling journey. Starting out solo and setting your own pace is a great way to get back into cycling. Taking 20-30 minute rides on flat terrain would be a great way to get started and gradually build up to longer rides. It is important to listen to your body and not push too hard at first.

(01-31-2023, 03:00 PM)Lss555 Wrote:  If you have bike paths in your city I’d recommend just going for a few hours ride on days off and get comfortable with riding. Then once you do that for a while and are more comfortable you can start commuting to work etc. Also if you don’t have bike path where you live you can always try riding gravel or off the beaten path roads where there isn’t much traffic. Just to get your barrings and go on some adventures finding cool places that you wouldn’t normally ever see.

Bike wise you can just ride what ever draws your attention, like if you think road biking seems interesting buy a road bike or if mountain biking fancies your interest go that route 🤘🏼

PS a smaller more agile road bike sounds like a good fit, as a smaller road bike is easier to control and isn’t as scary

I agree with your advice to gradually increase your time spent on the bike. Start with shorter rides in areas that feel comfortable, like bike paths or less traveled roads. This will help build confidence and get you used to riding again. When it comes to choosing a bike, I would recommend going with what interests you the most, be it road or mountain biking. And if you are leaning towards road biking, a smaller and more agile road bike could be a good option, as they are easier to control and less intimidating.

(01-31-2023, 04:12 AM)Sybian Wrote:  I do find it a bit odd that someone who works at a bicycle company ("business developer at Hygge Best Electric Bike Company. Delilah has a wealth of experience in the electric bike industry") was not able to obtain advice at her place of work regarding what type of bicycle best satisfies her needs. Just sayin'.

As far as keeping safe on the streets; stay off the streets. Considerate and attentive motorists are the main requirement for safety when riding on roads also occupied by motor vehicles.

I agree with your point about it being odd for someone in the bicycle industry not to have access to information about the best bike for their needs at their place of work. In terms of safety on the streets, your advice to stay off the street is understandable, but for those who need to commute on roads shared with motor vehicles, being cautious and aware of surroundings is key to ensuring safety. Additionally, wearing appropriate gear such as a helmet and using lights can also enhance one's visibility and help mitigate risk while riding on roads.

(01-30-2023, 01:06 PM)Talha Wrote:  As much as I love mountain bikes, for strictly urban riding, I wouldn't recommend them. If you're like me who goes overkill on mods and kits, the bike becomes too heavy and all the extra travel in suspensions is pretty much useless on paved roads (maybe if you hit a pothole they're useful). Plus, mountain bikes can be a little hard to maintain for newbies. I recommend a nice hybrid bike. It will keep you upright and comfortable while riding and won't cost as much as an MTB. 8 speed 12- 32 cassette will be fine for daily commutes.

I agree with your perspective on urban riding and the recommendation for a hybrid bike. Hybrid bikes are known for their versatility and comfort, making them ideal for city riding. They offer a balance between the speed of road bikes and the durability of mountain bikes, making them perfect for daily commutes. The 8 speed 12-32 cassette is also a good choice, providing enough gears for most city riding situations.
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