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First Metric Century
#1
I completed my first metric century (62 miles) yesterday. The route was almost 100% on the Glacial Drumlin trail in southeast Wisconsin. The route was about 50/50 gravel and tarmac. Overall it went well. I planned my nutrition and hydration well. I had plenty of energy. My issue was a sore undercarriage the last 20ish miles. I'd like to do a 100 mile ride in a month or so, but I'm wondering if the pain will be worth it. Perhaps I just need to upgrade my cycling shorts... LOL. What about you? Can you all do 100 miles without pain? Is pain just something that goes along with a long ride? My typical rides up to yesterday were 20 - 30 miles.


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Justin Schultz
2020 Scott Scale 970
2021 Felt Breed 30
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#2
(08-16-2022, 12:27 PM)J_R_Schultz Wrote:  I completed my first metric century (62 miles) yesterday. The route was almost 100% on the Glacial Drumlin trail in southeast Wisconsin. The route was about 50/50 gravel and tarmac. Overall it went well. I planned my nutrition and hydration well. I had plenty of energy. My issue was a sore undercarriage the last 20ish miles. I'd like to do a 100 mile ride in a month or so, but I'm wondering if the pain will be worth it. Perhaps I just need to upgrade my cycling shorts... LOL. What about you? Can you all do 100 miles without pain? Is pain just something that goes along with a long ride? My typical rides up to yesterday were 20 - 30 miles.

30 miles on gravel can be quite a bit of shock on the butt and arms, especially if you had some long stretches. If you were comfortable on the saddle for the first 3+ hours then I would assume that saddle design and position are good for you.
I tend to ride more road than off-road (80% / 20%) so my bike is set-up for road riding. If you ride in significantly different positions between road and gravel it may affect long term comfort when doing long rides with mixed terrain.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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#3
At some point in time, I will probably go for 100km in a day. I have done 60, 70 and 75 km in a day. 100km is challenging, as you can get tired towards the end. The key is to get in a lot of kilometers early, so you can take it easier towards the end.

Even consider wind and hills. Too much head wind will take its toll. You can probably go further on a level road compared to a hilly road. However, there is one place here where you can go 1 km up a steepish hill, and 10 km on a gentle downhill slope. You can go fast on the downhill section.

I haven't done it yet. See what happens.

To all those trying to get fitter, keep it up. We can all improve.
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#4
I did it. I did 100 km in a day. It was actually 102.5 km.

I did the first 50 km in 4 hours. That left me the rest of the day to do the other 50km. As I got nearer the end, I knew I could do it, so I took it easier.

I stopped for drinks and rest breaks at times. During the early part, they were short stops. Towards the end, they got longer. During the mid afternoon, when I was at 80km, it rained, so I had an excuse for a good rest.

On the day after, I did not have much energy, but I went out and did 30 km.

I am not planning to do this very often. It is challenging.

At this time, I am not planning to do 100 miles in a day. Hypothetically I could, maybe, but I would need to start well before daylight, and push myself to the limit. 100 miles is massively harder than 100 km. Maybe if I have a significant increase in fitness, I might consider it.
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#5
(08-16-2022, 12:27 PM)J_R_Schultz Wrote:  My issue was a sore undercarriage the last 20ish miles. I'd like to do a 100 mile ride in a month or so, but I'm wondering if the pain will be worth it. Perhaps I just need to upgrade my cycling shorts... LOL. What about you? Can you all do 100 miles without pain? Is pain just something that goes along with a long ride? My typical rides up to yesterday were 20 - 30 miles.

Doing 100 km, I had a little soreness in my undercarriage, but not pain, not enough to be a problem. I like to get a large comfortable seat, and set up the bike to have a comfortable riding position. A large seat may not look cool for those wanting to look like a professional cyclist, but I find it comfortable. You support your weight on a larger area.

In the past, when I did little cycling, and went out cycling, I would get soreness and pain. I found that cycling toughens up that area, so it is not a serious problem.
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#6
Great!!
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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#7
As I said, on the day after doing 100 km, I did not have much energy, but I went out and did 30 km.

On the second day after, my energy level had returned to how it was before doing the 100 km. I did 60 km on that day.

As you get fitter, you can:

1. ride faster.

2. ride for longer distances.

3. recover more quickly from tiredness and fatigue.

I would like to encourage those who are less fit to do their best, and get fitter.
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#8
Congratulations!

Soreness is part of the deal haha Big Grin Proper padding can help a bit, yes, but it won't take away the issue completely. How is your "saddle situation"? Have you had a professional take a look at leg height/fit (riding position as you mentioned)?
"Carbon is faster"
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#9
I am getting ready for my yearly century, but I will not be doing any long training rides over 50 miles.
I will be using a heavier bike to train on with added weight for water (1/2 gal.) and food, panniers, etc.
They have significant rest stops on the course if I really need much food or water so I can ride with frame bottles and not use rack or bags to tote stuff.
My overall bike and gear weight will be significantly lower for the event than the bike and equipment used for training. I would estimate near 10 pounds lighter (less 2 lbs just for H2O).
I would do longer rides for training, but with past injuries I prefer to save the body for the big ride since I already know how I feel after 100 miles.
You should always try to cycle a little the next day, but at a casual pace (if you crushed the 100mi) and low to moderate distance just to keep the body limber and as a way of determining if you may have an injury. If you have received no actual injury from the century ride you should not feel bad except for some exhaustion the next day. Any discomfort that goes beyond a day or two and is also noticeable in near future cycling regardless of distance might indicate an injury that was not evident during the ride.
Your behind should not be too sore for days after. If it, or any other body area is sore then you might want to get checked out by your MD.
I know I'll have a sore back if I ride more than 30 miles in the drops so I avoid doing that for prolonged periods (not a race after all) , and I'll ride a lower gear to keep the knees from screaming. Neither of which concern me on shorter rides.
My biggest reason for short training rides is the heat; hours of 90° F weather can take its toll more than the cycling. Thankfully the ride is late October so much cooler than now. The event has back to back century rides over the weekend. I have never done that except when touring 40 years ago; and I take the day off the from work the next day to recover if necessary.
I invite all to come and enjoy and fine ride with like minded folk. the "horse" course starts and ends at a brewery (free pint for the riders!).
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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#10
(08-16-2022, 12:27 PM)J_R_Schultz Wrote:  I completed my first metric century (62 miles) yesterday. The route was almost 100% on the Glacial Drumlin trail in southeast Wisconsin. The route was about 50/50 gravel and tarmac. Overall it went well. I planned my nutrition and hydration well. I had plenty of energy. My issue was a sore undercarriage the last 20ish miles. I'd like to do a 100 mile ride in a month or so, but I'm wondering if the pain will be worth it. Perhaps I just need to upgrade my cycling shorts... LOL. What about you? Can you all do 100 miles without pain? Is pain just something that goes along with a long ride? My typical rides up to yesterday were 20 - 30 miles.

I recently rode that same trail as part of Ride Across Wisconsin (98 miles day 1 and 135 mi day 2). Doing 62 miles is a good ride. Doing 100+ miles, yes, some soreness is to be expected. Like anything, one's body needs time to adapt to increasing demands made upon it. There is a lot going on both in your message and in riding long distances. Yes, invest in a very good pair of cycling shorts. Some shorts are specifically designed for long hours in the saddle. If you have the opportunity, get with a professional bike fitter to check your bike fit. But if it's just your tush, it's likely your overall fit is pretty reasonable. But is your saddle fitted to you? The correct size to fit your "sit bones". Are you sitting upright, on the hoods, or in the drops? Variety is the spice of life! The course is actually pretty comfortable: the gravel is not terribly different from the paved portions of the trail. But the entire route is fairly flat. I find a flat course actually harder on my tush than one with hills. What the hills offer is a chance to stand on your pedals. On a flat course, one ends up sitting the entire time.

So, ensure your saddle is the proper size for your "undercarriage" and offers appropriate support (consider an anatomic saddle). Try and plan on some time standing or well-timed breaks to give your tush tissues time to briefly recover. Consider training on progressively longer rides in order to help develop increased tissue density and skin calluses in the undercarriage area. One final suggestion. Sweat (and the salt contained within) can create a sandpaper-like effect, accelerating chaffing. To help mitigate this, I tend to use lanolin on the undercarriage to minimize chaffing, especially on longer rides. I've tried many products over the years, but lanolin has been the best so far.

Happy (and more comfortable) riding!
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#11
(09-27-2022, 08:19 PM)JJD Wrote:  
(08-16-2022, 12:27 PM)J_R_Schultz Wrote:  I completed my first metric century (62 miles) yesterday. The route was almost 100% on the Glacial Drumlin trail in southeast Wisconsin. The route was about 50/50 gravel and tarmac. Overall it went well. I planned my nutrition and hydration well. I had plenty of energy. My issue was a sore undercarriage the last 20ish miles. I'd like to do a 100 mile ride in a month or so, but I'm wondering if the pain will be worth it. Perhaps I just need to upgrade my cycling shorts... LOL. What about you? Can you all do 100 miles without pain? Is pain just something that goes along with a long ride? My typical rides up to yesterday were 20 - 30 miles.

I recently rode that same trail as part of Ride Across Wisconsin (98 miles day 1 and 135 mi day 2). Doing 62 miles is a good ride. Doing 100+ miles, yes, some soreness is to be expected. Like anything, one's body needs time to adapt to increasing demands made upon it. There is a lot going on both in your message and in riding long distances. Yes, invest in a very good pair of cycling shorts. Some shorts are specifically designed for long hours in the saddle. If you have the opportunity, get with a professional bike fitter to check your bike fit. But if it's just your tush, it's likely your overall fit is pretty reasonable. But is your saddle fitted to you? The correct size to fit your "sit bones". Are you sitting upright, on the hoods, or in the drops? Variety is the spice of life! The course is actually pretty comfortable: the gravel is not terribly different from the paved portions of the trail. But the entire route is fairly flat. I find a flat course actually harder on my tush than one with hills. What the hills offer is a chance to stand on your pedals. On a flat course, one ends up sitting the entire time.

So, ensure your saddle is the proper size for your "undercarriage" and offers appropriate support (consider an anatomic saddle). Try and plan on some time standing or well-timed breaks to give your tush tissues time to briefly recover. Consider training on progressively longer rides in order to help develop increased tissue density and skin calluses in the undercarriage area. One final suggestion. Sweat (and the salt contained within) can create a sandpaper-like effect, accelerating chaffing. To help mitigate this, I tend to use lanolin on the undercarriage to minimize chaffing, especially on longer rides. I've tried many products over the years, but lanolin has been the best so far.

Happy (and more comfortable) riding!

Good input!!
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply


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