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How many kilometers do you get from bike parts?
#1
How many kilometers do you normally get from your chain, cassette or freewheel, brake pads, and all those parts that need to be replaced?

Have you had any experience with any brands of bikes or parts that last longer?
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#2
I have one bike that I bought used with already 5 years (total previous miles or Km's unknown) of use on it. I have ridden that bike for 35 years (the first 20 years exclusively) and has approximately 30000 miles (48000 Km) on it. I have only changed 2 chains, and 2 bottom bracket assemblies, and 2 sets of brake lever hoods during that time due to wear. My present pedals replaced the still functioning original pedals because I finally went clipless; the clipless pedals have been used for 30 years. Replaced the original saddle for personal reasons. I certainly replaced bar tape more than anything and have no idea as to how many times. Bike has been maintained regularly since it was a daily rider. Maintenance and usage conditions are the 2 biggest factors determining parts wear out. In my opinion, and experience, distance travelled has far less to do with bicycle parts wearing out than not keeping up wih the required maintenance. If you use a bike in dirty and/or wet conditions I would expect more accelerated wearing out of parts; but even then more regular servicing, even to the degree of daily maintenance of some parts (chains, cogs), will greatly increase their life. A chain can easily get a lot more use, but most riders give it the least care, and it is the cause of wear to the cogs.
That bike is now over 40 years old with an original equipment derailleur from 1974. The original owner built it up with used parts before I purchased it. We both raced on it.
Brake pads are not worn out, but they have hardened over time and should be replaced.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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#3
Depends on the components naturally.

I'm a Clydesdale and my hard riding, spiriting, etc. can see that cheaper components will last me about 2 seasons before performance drops.

I just got a oval chainring from Deckas last September It's an aluminum 44T. I inspected it this week when overhauling and I estimate it will last me till the end of the season, then I'll likely need to replace it. If it was a steel chainring, it might last an additional season from that. In my opinion, front derailleurs are the worst components. They go out faster than anything else, especially the lower series and non-series Shimano ones. That's showbiz for you. The name of the game is to make it as consumable as possible.
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#4
I personally have a great experience with Shimano bike parts. Ultegra groupset has lasted since 2015 on my road bike and I haven't changed a single component yet. Have to say that it's relatively lightly used. Meanwhile, my 29 inch mountain bike and its Deore/XT is riding into its 4th season, two of them include steep uphill and downhill rides in the Alps but two others - constant winter rides with heavy snowfall. However, my older MTB with Deore had rear hub/cassette issues after two months of training rides and it was a factory defect. Bottom line - Shimano means quality Smile To be frank, I don't have experience with SRAM, Oval, Campagnolo & other brands.
Merida Scultura 5000 (2015)
Merida Big Nine 400 (2019)
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#5
It seems to me that if people are wearing out bike components as quickly as I am reading about (excluding professionals and those using their bike for commercial use) then better components should be utilized for the intended use, preventative maintenance needs to be conducted more often, and the bike itself needs to be set-up better and more probably to the direct needs of the user and not always by technical specs. I know I would tend to wear out chainrings much quicker if I set up my chainline per spec., but I have modified my set-up to take into consideration that I ride in 3 gears almost exclusively on the terrain I tend the ride on. This keeps my chain straight (thus much quieter, and less chain wear) and keeps my rings from being chewed up. Keeping all aluminum parts free from grit is a big difference in longevity. Just like the motor oil in a vehicle, if it is discolored then it needs to be changed. It has nothing to do with mileage, but with the driving (riding) conditions, and the actual condition of the parts at any given time since wear of one component can accelerate or exacerbate the wear on another part. Personally, I feel that more than about one hour or about 20 miles requires some level of drivetrain cleaning; most of which can be done without major disassembly of the bike (sprockets, chain), and takes very little time. Certainly, if using the bike on a daily basis (as I have before) it necessitates adequate servicing on a weekly basis unless you just want to ride until things stop performing as they should. At 25 miles a day/150 weekly you need to do the work or pay the price. My chains, front and rear sprockets, hubs, etc. have with very few exceptions (even with cheaper parts) lasted easily 5 to 10 years or more. I could pull a 30 year old ring off one regilar rider and it shows minimal wear after 10000 miles. If new parts are cheaper (or thinner-newer cogs) then maybe it is best to regress to older more durable and well designed components since all that computer design and high tech alloys/composites do not seem to be towing the line. Most people want 9 to 11 speed cassettes yet never use much of their range.. Give me a properly geared 5 speed freewheel and I'll bike circles around many having twice the amount of gears. Imagine if you had to keep replacing automotive components as regularly as some cyclists say they wear out parts; manufacturers would be out of business for producing crap and nobody would be buying their products. Bike riders just do not seem to grasp the fact that they are being taken in by the industry. Heck, even our old kids bikes that we put through everything and only marginally maintained lasted decades. Someone who goes through a steel chainwheel in 2 seasons needs to better align their components and keep them cleaner
Best practice: clean daily, lube weekly, service monthly; and you will not have many issues, and parts will last much longer.

That primarily goes for road bikes (tri and TT); but even more so cross, mtb, or any offroad bike or vehicle.
Ride Fast, Be Safe!
Howard
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#6
I have a slight follow up question, I have always used Shimano Ultegra or 105 and use the entire grouppo no exceptions and lightly cleaned the chain one a week during riding season, and lube it. I tend to ride in the same two gears short of hill climbing or descending. I change the chain, probably early, and follow the rule every third change the cassette. I have ripped one or two chains early (Last year less than 200 miles on a covid KMC chain.

12 years on a Serotta Columbus SL Steel and now 14 on a Guru Carbon which I am retiring, (my body changed after mechanical work done on me.)

I just purchased a Specialized Roubais Sport, I was surprised all 105 except for the Chain, which is KMC. Clean/lubed, dialed in when in a stand, but slight noise when spinning. Not sure if this will cause premature wear, or if it is psychosomatic on behalf of my new steed. LBS said no Shimano chains to be found, easy to find on-line? My wife just got a new Parlee full 105 including chain....

Also have two steeds for sale, the 2008 GURU evolo blue on black, men's 52 Ultegra Compact and a Womens Specialized Dolce Comp (Women's specific design, first edition 2004) 50, Ultegra triple. Local pickup in Boston Area only.
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#7
(06-06-2022, 11:04 AM)marc s Wrote:  I have a slight follow up question, I have always used Shimano Ultegra or 105 and use the entire grouppo no exceptions and lightly cleaned the chain one a week during riding season, and lube it. I tend to ride in the same two gears short of hill climbing or descending. I change the chain, probably early, and follow the rule every third change the cassette. I have ripped one or two chains early (Last year less than 200 miles on a covid KMC chain.

12 years on a Serotta Columbus SL Steel and now 14 on a Guru Carbon which I am retiring, (my body changed after mechanical work done on me.)

I just purchased a Specialized Roubais Sport, I was surprised all 105 except for the Chain, which is KMC. Clean/lubed, dialed in when in a stand, but slight noise when spinning. Not sure if this will cause premature wear, or if it is psychosomatic on behalf of my new steed. LBS said no Shimano chains to be found, easy to find on-line? My wife just got a new Parlee full 105 including chain....

Also have two steeds for sale, the 2008 GURU evolo blue on black, men's 52 Ultegra Compact and a Womens Specialized Dolce Comp (Women's specific design, first edition 2004) 50, Ultegra triple. Local pickup in Boston Area only.

Hey Marc,

Welcome to the site. I have regularly used KMC chains without any issue on my newer (8 to 10 cassette) bikes. No problems over thousands of miles.
As a previous member stated, your chainline might not be at its most efficient position if you primarily ride in only 2 gears in the rear. Check to see where the chain rides in relation to the front and rear sprockets you primarily use. If it site fairly straight in relation to the the gears front and rear when in your favorite speed(s) than you should have minimal chain and sprocket wear. Even given a little bit of offset where the chain is at a slight angle to the front and/or rear gears it should not cause excessive chain wear and usually the most wear will be evident on the chainring due to it being aluminum. A little offset can cause more drivetrain noise than a straight running chain. Also, shorter chainstays will exaggerate that same noise because there is less distance between the sprockets front to rear and the chain angle will be greater when engaging the the gear teeth.

I would think you should be able to find a 105 (or other Shimano chain), but with the supply lines still a little rough given the global situation the last couple years there may be delays in ordering and/or just very limited supplies which are going directly to the bike manufacturers/assemblers.

Post your "for sale" bikes in the marketplace forum here with adequate photos (full views both sides, detailed shots of components, etc.) and descriptions (to include: bar stem, crank, top tube, and seat tube lengths; etc.), and standover height.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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