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Tips on attempting to cold set a damaged steel frame
#1
I have a brand new 2020 Pake Rum Runner track frame (CrMo), which is supposed to have the standard 120mm rear spacing. It arrived with spacing closer to 100mm, and I can't get the rear wheel in. There is a dent on the inside of the drive side chain stay that causes the dropout to angle inward.

I just bought a bunch of track parts from various sources for this specific bike, and I'd really prefer to not go through the return process with everything, especially given how hard bikes are to come by these days. I should have measured the dropouts before beginning to install parts, but I didn't. The bike is fully assembled except for the wheels and chain.

I don't have the tools or know-how to attempt this myself, and I don't know where to look for someone who could attempt to cold set the frame - if my LBS doesn't feel comfortable doing it and doesn't have any recommendations, I don't know where else I'd turn. I live in Colorado.

Thanks very much for any insights you might have.
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#2
(01-23-2022, 02:31 PM)robbyjca Wrote:  I have a brand new 2020 Pake Rum Runner track frame (CrMo), which is supposed to have the standard 120mm rear spacing. It arrived with spacing closer to 100mm, and I can't get the rear wheel in. There is a dent on the inside of the drive side chain stay that causes the dropout to angle inward.

I just bought a bunch of track parts from various sources for this specific bike, and I'd really prefer to not go through the return process with everything, especially given how hard bikes are to come by these days. I should have measured the dropouts before beginning to install parts, but I didn't. The bike is fully assembled except for the wheels and chain.

I don't have the tools or know-how to attempt this myself, and I don't know where to look for someone who could attempt to cold set the frame - if my LBS doesn't feel comfortable doing it and doesn't have any recommendations, I don't know where else I'd turn. I live in Colorado.

Thanks very much for any insights you might have.

Hi Robby,

You should return the frame at the seller's expense and have them provide a new frame to you. There is a very good chance that they would have another given the fact that it is a track frame. Odd that there would be a dent on the inside of the stay except from creasing due to the stay being crushed inward during shipping. That should not happen because when shipping a frame (new or used) both front and rear forks should be reinforced (wooden block, bolted, plastic stop, etc.) to prevent any damage due to crushing. If the rear fork was protected then that damage must have occurred prior to packing. If it is 'creased' then it is also weakened and cold setting would exacerbate the problem. 2cm is quite a bit of bend from damage. 2cm's is the max that I would ever re-space a frame in the first place. At least you won't have to worry about drop-out alignment since your frame would be going back to its original geometry if re-set 2cm. You could only re-set 1cm and probably be just fine also. I never re-set a frame due to the ages of the frames (40yrs and older) I work on, and also keeping within a one size increase when changing hubs (120mm to 125/126mm, or 125/126mm to 130mm) which doesn't affect drop-out alignment to any great degree.
I would send photos to the dealer showing the damage and the rear fork spacing. Give an explanation of how you assembled the frame and didn't know there was an issue until attempting to install the rear wheel; why would know, it's supposed to new and to specifications. Provide a photo of your hub's O.L.D.

Remember, once you modify the frame, whether for repair or customization, you void the warranty!

If you still think cold setting is a preferable option then check out this link to Sheldon Brown's site:
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html&ved=2ahUKEwjWooyJ5cj1AhWeI0QIHfoEAeMQFnoECAQQAQ&usg=AOvVaw3yLh2l7RZQ9OS19LNgYfbk
There are other articles and videos out there to help those wanting to do this themselves. If you bring it to a shop I would find out first if they have experience doing this procedure before handing over the frame. If they haven't done it before then let them learn on someone else's bike.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
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#3
I am with Jesper on this since it is a new frame it should be correct. If it were 5mm out, then it is a simple process to fix, however 20mm is a lot of movement and not acceptable on a new frame. If you had pictures of what you describe as a dent it just might confirm my opinion.
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#4
I can swear my old serrota nova with sl Columbus tubing on the drive side chainstay had a crimp in the center to add lateral rigidity to the rear triangle which allows you to accelerate faster. I no longer have it I loved the custom paint fade wine to black ( crashed bike damn ne potholes and driver would not let me out slowed down and wheel got caught). At least I lived to mourn it.
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#5
(01-29-2022, 03:54 PM)marc s Wrote:  I can swear my old serrota nova with sl Columbus tubing on the drive side chainstay had a crimp in the center to add lateral rigidity to the rear triangle which allows you to accelerate faster. I no longer have it I loved the custom paint fade wine to black ( crashed bike damn ne potholes and driver would not let me out slowed down and wheel got caught). At least I lived to mourn it.

Many frames incorporate short indentations in the chain stays on the wheel side for tire clearance and/or stiffening purposes. Some of these were deeper or longer than others. Some Colnagos (and probably other brands) also had Colmbus "Profil" stays which have a very narrow and shallow indentation/groove (similar to Nuovo Mexico "Profil" top and down tubes) along the majority of the length of the stays for stiffening. Stays could also have an indent on the exterior drive side for chainring clearance; not sure if they ever intended those for stiffening also.
Unless we see a photo of the "dent" it would be hard to determine if it is the cause of the rear fork spacing being narrowed; but it does make sense if the dent has a vertical aspect as opposed to horizontal which would generally indicate a manufactured feature.
Take care,
Jesper

"I am become Death, the destroyer of bicycles." NJS
  Reply


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