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Front shocks.
#1
Is there away to fix front shocks, after they wear out, into a fixed fork without having to go through the expense of replacing them?
Maybe drill holes through the shocks and insert two bolts into each side to faston the two pieces together? Or is there a after market fix for this?
"Where ever we go, there we are"
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#2
How about a couple of hose clamps on the stanchion tube so they can't slide anymore. (Mostly kidding)
You could probably do something like this to lock the fork so it won't compress, but I wouldn't consider that making it into a rigid fork. Two of the issues with suspension forks is the added weight and the flex that having multiple parts introduces. A good rigid fork is tuned to offer some road shock reducing flex while being stiff and predictable for turning/handling issues. They also have slightly different geometry to account for the fact that they aren't changing shape all the time.

If the 'spring' parts of a fork aren't working well and you just want to lock it out and ride it in rigid mode, that should be fine. It won't quite be like a rigid fork, but that's ok for casual riding.

However, please do NOT drill holes in your fork or do anything else that might weaken it. Injury awaits...
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#3
(01-28-2015, 03:45 PM)DaveM Wrote:  How about a couple of hose clamps on the stanchion tube so they can't slide anymore. (Mostly kidding)
You could probably do something like this to lock the fork so it won't compress, but I wouldn't consider that making it into a rigid fork. Two of the issues with suspension forks is the added weight and the flex that having multiple parts introduces. A good rigid fork is tuned to offer some road shock reducing flex while being stiff and predictable for turning/handling issues. They also have slightly different geometry to account for the fact that they aren't changing shape all the time.

If the 'spring' parts of a fork aren't working well and you just want to lock it out and ride it in rigid mode, that should be fine. It won't quite be like a rigid fork, but that's ok for casual riding.

However, please do NOT drill holes in your fork or do anything else that might weaken it. Injury awaits...

I was down at the local bike shop yesterday and the proprietor had a set of front shocks he had removed from a bike, in very good shape, with the exact stem and brake hangers. I purchased it off of him and will install them on my bike. I think this will be the last bike I buy with front shocks. Not really a fan of them anymore.
"Where ever we go, there we are"
  Reply


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