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RST Neon T10 fork
#1
I just bought a new RST Neon T10 75mm fork for my bike, and I want to know how to maintain it properly. Most of the videos on the subject of maintaining simillar forks I've seen on You Tube seem to have been produced by people who want to sell forks, because most of them emphasize that it's not worth it to do anything at all with it, and then go on to describe proceedures for performing maintainance after the fork has completely seized up or has rust on it.
I haven't been able to find anything specific to this particular model, but judging from how the one I've had on the bike has held up, I'm pretty sure I'll get years of use out of it for the kind of riding I do. But I don't know, does the adjuster cap on the preload side of the fork unscrew or is it sealed on? I've had the lowers off, and the other side doesn't have a coil spring, just a push rod for damping, I guess.
Is anyone familliar with the RST Neon T10?
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#2
It is a very low end fork. The labor cost at a shop for maintenance runs more than the cost of the fork. Generally, keep it clean, wipe it down with a clean rag.

Most of us on this forum would rather have a rigid fork, which is much lighter, more responsive and no porpoising.
Nigel
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#3
(11-21-2014, 12:07 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  It is a very low end fork. The labor cost at a shop for maintenance runs more than the cost of the fork. Generally, keep it clean, wipe it down with a clean rag.

Most of us on this forum would rather have a rigid fork, which is much lighter, more responsive and no porpoising.

The reason I chose the RST Neon T10 was because it seemed the most appropriate suspenion fork for the kind of riding I do, mostly paved bike trails with the occasional detour through a gravel patch, dirt road or a construction area with potholes or rough pavement. The fork it's replacing was on the bike for ten years and has served the same purpose reasonably well, and it's got a much less sophosticated design. I really don't think it's low end, and it will perform really well for a long time for what I want to use it for.
It goes without saying that I'll clean the fork along with the bike frame regularly, but I don't know if the coil spring can be accessed and regreased and cleaned, or if it's sealed inside the inner stansion. Cleaning and regreasing a coil spring fork is a simple procedure I could easily do myself. It doesn't require any special lubricants or replacement seals either, the way air sprung forks with oil baths do, which was another thing I considered when buying it.
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#4
My riding areas are similar to yours; this year I removed the only suspension fork I had on a bike http://forums.bikeride.com/thread-3167-page-1.html and replaced it with rigid. My primary riding is 10 miles each way commuting. I also try to get some riding in on weekends.

Low-end - it is definitely very low-end. Mid to High-end suspension forks are 5X the cost and up.
Nigel
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#5
(11-21-2014, 11:47 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  My riding areas are similar to yours; this year I removed the only suspension fork I had on a bike http://forums.bikeride.com/thread-3167-page-1.html and replaced it with rigid. My primary riding is 10 miles each way commuting. I also try to get some riding in on weekends.

Low-end - it is definitely very low-end. Mid to High-end suspension forks are 5X the cost and up.

Regarding the quality of the fork, I'd say that it's well built out of good quality materials, and that it will function safely and well for many years if it's maintained properly.
As a consumer, I can't lie and say I'm basing my opinion on a lot of experience with many different kinds of bikes. To be honest, I can't remember the last time I rode a bike with a rigid fork. What I do know is, the fork that's on the bike now has perfomed reliably for about ten years, and it was made by the same manufacture. The materials and design of the new fork are clearly better, and so I feel that it will perform at least as well.
As a cyclist, I have to say that here in Florida, I can't imagine finding any use for a $500.00 fork. Here, the bedrock is coquina limestone, and there are barely even rocks, much less hills or mountains. The terrain is flat, from one end of the state to the other. The biggest issue here would be corrosion, as sudden downpours are common, and the air by the ocean is full of salt.
If I had to guess, I'd say that probably there wouldn't be much difference between the Neon T10 and a more expensive fork, except for weight, untill it started to wear out. I believe that proper maintainance will keep it working well for a long time.
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