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New hub doesnt freewheel
#1
I have had built a custom rear rim which uses a Novatec D042 hub. I received the rim back via courier yesterday, fitted the tube and tyre on and mounted it back on the frame (a Specialized Cross Trail Sport Disc hybrid).
When I turn the pedals with the bike on the maintenance stand and then stop turning, simulating freewheeling down a hill for example, the hub doesnt freewheel, it keeps turning the pedals like it was a fixed gear bike.
I know the obvious answer is to go back to the guy who built the rim (and who also put the disc brake and cogs back on the new rim for me) but he is away on holiday for a week.

Im not at all tech or maintenance savvy, so I guess my question is is there a way to work out what the issue is here or should I just wait and contact the guy who built the rim? (after 6 weeks waiting for it to come Im impatient to ride!!)

The Hub:
NovaTec D042SB, Silver, 36h,

- 6 bolt disc brake compatible (international standard)
- silver in 36h
- black in 32h
- Shimano HG compatible
- Sealed cartridge bearings
- Front has 2 bearings cartridges
- Rear has 4 bearing cartridges
- Cromoly axles
- 3 Pawls (rear freehub body)
- Front 216g, 491g rear (707g/pair)

These hubs are not designed to be light weight. They are tough and durable. They offer an economical alternative for those looking to run sealed cartridge bearings. They are ideal for touring or high milage applications; commuting with disc brakes etc.
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#2
First step is to remove the wheel from the bike and see if the problem is the hub or the way it's mounted in the frame.
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#3
On some freehubs, particularly brand new ones, they will offer a small amount of resistance to freewheeling and will drive the pedals like you describe. Does it take a lot of force to make it freewheel or something very light like just putting a finger on one of the pedals? If it takes a lot of force, then there may be an internal problem in the hub.

If it's very light, it's probably just the way the hub is. It may break in a little as you ride it some. Might be worth talking to the hub manufacturer to confirm.
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#4
(08-06-2014, 01:05 PM)cny-man Wrote:  First step is to remove the wheel from the bike and see if the problem is the hub or the way it's mounted in the frame.


Ok did this, when I hold the wheel when it's not mounted on the frame I can make the cogs turn and the is a kind of clicking sound. Is that what is supposed to happen? But as soon as I put it back on the frame, not doing up the quick release or anything, then the same problem occurs. It won't free wheel and just continues to drive the pedals round.
(08-06-2014, 01:55 PM)DaveM Wrote:  On some freehubs, particularly brand new ones, they will offer a small amount of resistance to freewheeling and will drive the pedals like you describe. Does it take a lot of force to make it freewheel or something very light like just putting a finger on one of the pedals? If it takes a lot of force, then there may be an internal problem in the hub.

If it's very light, it's probably just the way the hub is. It may break in a little as you ride it some. Might be worth talking to the hub manufacturer to confirm.

It doesn't freewheel at all, period! If I push the pedals around and then stop and let go it continues to drive the pedals around by it self or if I grab the pedal and hold it in the same position, all that happens is the chain goes all slack and bunches up.
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#5
OK, something's definitely wrong then. I can't picture what would change when you put the wheel on the bike, but that's definitely not normal. The only thing I can think of is that the cassette is installed wrong and it's rubbing on the hub or spokes somehow? Putting the wheel in the frame and clamping it down does put force on the axle that can bind up the bearings if there's other problems. But you're saying it won't freewheel even if the wheel is in the frame loosely. So I'm thinking it's more an issue of physical interference between the cogs and something.

I'd trying taking off the cassette next and see what happens when you just spin the freehub and/or put the wheel on the bike with the cassette off to see if it still freewheels then.
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#6
Something seems to be getting me lost. The OP says he can make the freehub operate by hand, but if you stop the pedals when the wheel is in the frame, supported by a stand, the chain bunches up?
Huh? The OP made no mention of it being hard to turn against the pawls.
Yeah, I'd take the cassette off & confirm the freehub is turning easily. Then check it in the frame (with your fingertips, no cogs yet). Then put the rear cogs back on.
Or take it to ANY local bike shop, they should be able to spin the freehub & give an opinion in a few seconds.
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