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Help restoring ancient tandem
#1
[attachment=4922]I just purchased this ancient tandem for $40 and thought it would be a fun project, especially with summer around the corner and living close to the beach. How ever, I'm not a bike expert . I want to know what I will need to replaced or what can be salvaged. I appreciate any help I can get on the matter.
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#2
With all respect how can we possibly tell you what needs to be replaced or salvaged (repaired, overhauled, cleaned, de-rusted) without our hands on the bike or at the very least closeup pics and a full description of what you observe?

Telling us you're not a bike expert does not tell us what skill you do have or what tools you have available - just changing flats and tweaking derailleurs, full bearing overhaul and wheelbuilding, or something in-between.

It helps to know what city you are in (don't worry the NSA doesn't care) so we can possibly direct you to helpful resources. Is there a bike co-op nearby or a shop that offers repair clinics or that specializes in used bikes? Failing that do you have a knowledgeable friend who can give it a look?

p.s. Knowing the brand (what's on the head badge) rather than just the model (Super?) would be a first step.
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#3
Like said above, hard to get into much detail without at least better pics.

The obvious things are tires, seats, chains, maybe rear gear cluster, brake pads, probably all cables, bearings need repacking.

But before you do any of that, I would:
- make sure you can move the seat posts. If these are seized in the frame, it's not worth doing much of anything until you solve that problem.
- carefully inspect the frame for cracks, damage, or rust that goes deeper than just surface. Tandems get a lot more stress than a normal bike and this one's obviously been sitting out a long time.
- I would actually remove the fork from the frame (not that hard) to inspect the part of it that goes through the frame (steerer tube) for any damage/rush/cracks as well. Not to scare you off, but you just want to be extra careful with tandems to make sure they're structurally sound.

That all said, unless you run in to something major, it looks to me like a great bike/project and well worth bringing back to life.
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#4
Based on the cranks and general shape of the frame - it is not ancient; looks like 1980's or newer.

Interesting that it is currently set up ~90° out of phase.
Nigel
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#5
(03-16-2014, 01:35 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  Interesting that it is currently set up ~90° out of phase.
He means the pedals aren't lined up. Forgive him, he's an engineer.
For sure, you need 2 new chains, tires, new rear gears and a seat, all of which are cheap, but it adds up quick.
Pictures! At least close ones of
Rear gears
The brakes
The shifters
The writing on the tires. 26 x 1.95? 26 x 2.125?
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