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Metric vs Imperial
#1
Am I correct in thinking all bicycles (or at least all bicycles sold at major retailers) require metric-based tools? Is there any reason to keep or use Imperial-based tools at a bicycle work area?
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#2
(05-06-2012, 01:37 AM)hvacstudent Wrote:  Am I correct in thinking all bicycles (or at least all bicycles sold at major retailers) require metric-based tools? Is there any reason to keep or use Imperial-based tools at a bicycle work area?

In your case you deal with mostly newer bicycles, so I would say no if all you were doing was bicycles. HOWEVER, as an assembler you may come into a different project that would require an SAE tool. So yes they are worth keeping if you have them.
Others may agree or disagree. Tools are an invaluable asset to have. Old saying better to have it and not need it then need it and not have it Wink .
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#3
(05-06-2012, 04:26 AM)Bill Wrote:  ....

...... HOWEVER, as an assembler you may come into a different project that would require an SAE tool. So yes they are worth keeping if you have them.
......

+ 1
Nigel
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#4
Quote:Originally posted by Bill
HOWEVER, as an assembler you may come into a different project that would require an SAE tool. So yes they are worth keeping if you have them.
I didn't mean that I want to throw the Imperial tools away. I just want to move them out of my cramped work area. I can store some tools in a maintenance closet at the other end of the building. Thank you for your prompt answer.
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#5
Yes, there is reason to keep (basic) SAE tools at hand! For starters - unless you have a dedicated pedal wrench such as from Park Tool, you will find that 2 and 3 piece crankarms as found on most adult bikes have 15 mm flats on the pedals. Most 1 piece cranks, as on Juvi bikes, have 1/2" flats on the pedals.
Also, you will probably find that some of the tools that you use require SAE tools to work on. My hacksaw has a 3/8" tension bolt, for example.

In all honesty - I keep a SAE socket set handy under the bench, and all of my SAE wrenches (from 1/4" to 7/8") on one peg next to the metrics that have a dedicated peg for each size.
If you are working in a bike shop and sell a Yakima, Saris or Thule hitch-mount rack, and the customer asks for assistance in putting it on the vehicle; you're going to want that 3/4" wrench and Now!
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
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#6
Well, I do have a set of cheap imperial allen and hex wrenches. Never used them. But then I'm living in a country that uses mostly metric (SI) units (except for blood pressure I think and aviation / nautic which is "international" and thus in nautical miles, knots and feet, except for glider pilots who still use meters, kilometers and km/h, except when they fly to high and have to look at flight levels, which are in hectofeet... wow, exceptions of exceptions of... etc.).
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#7
Quote:Originally posted by RobAR
...unless you have a dedicated pedal wrench such as from Park Tool...
I have one.

Quote:Originally posted by RobAR
My hacksaw has a 3/8" tension bolt, for example.
Can you describe an instance when you used a hacksaw to assemble a bike?

Quote:Originally posted by RobAR
If you are working in a bike shop and sell a Yakima, Saris or Thule hitch-mount rack, and the customer asks for assistance in putting it on the vehicle; you're going to want that 3/4" wrench and Now!
We don't sell bike racks. Even if we did, we are generally forbidden from attaching anything to the outside of a customer's vehicle for fear of a lawsuit.

Quote:Originally posted by Joe_W
...hectofeet...
That word just dissuaded me from ever attending a flight school outside the US.
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#8
Flight levels are in hectofeet above the 1013.25 hPa (or mbar if you prefer that) pressure level. This is an international standard... (though calling a non SI thing a standard makes me sad).
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