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Nightmare 1st Time Brake Bleed Contd...
#1
Hey guys,

Just thought I'd update you all.

The bleeding of my brakes went a LITTLE better than last time, although I still lost quite a lot of oil to the floor!!

I don't know how many of you are familiar with brake bleeding but when you have the two syringes attached, one at the caliper & one at the master cylinder, I've no idea how to remove either of them without oil coming out of either the syringe or the actual bleed port! Luckily I managed to close the oil ports on both sides in time for there still to be enough left in the system to operate the brake.

However, all is not well!!!!

When you bleed Magura brakes, the tutorial video instructs you to elevate the master cylinder to approx 15 degrees for bleeding, obviously this means you have to loosen the clamp bolt that's holding it onto the handlebar with a 5mm allen key.

Through my struggles yesterday & today in bleeding my brakes & several times having turned that particular clamp, I've somehow managed to strip the thread!! And now the brake won't stay on the handlebar at all because the whole are of the handlebar mount were the stripped thread is has basically disintegrated!!! : (

Here's some pics of the nightmarish ordeal.....(click to enlarge!) Wouldn't allow me to attach pics at bottom, file size too big apparently....

[Image: 6c54d5129768648.gif]

[Image: 3850da129768735.gif]

[Image: 7c548b129768515.gif]

One rather obvious question, does anyone know what I can do??!!!

Is there anywhere I can get a spare handlebar mount??

I'd rather not have to replace the whole brake system that's all. It would be a little on the costly side you see!!

Any help much appreciated fellas.

Si
  Reply
#2
Never bled disk brakes on a bike before, only on my car and truck. However, if the issue is spilling oil from the syringe and oil wells on the bike, try putting a tube between the syringe and the oil well so you can crimp the tube and remove the syringe without loosing too much oil. Just an idea.
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Daily
  Reply
#3
Erm, I hate to break this to you but I think that's a new master cylinder/lever assembly needed there. However unless you've been a complete ham-fisted gorilla it shouldn't have broken like that, if they're still under warranty try and get them replaced.

As for bleeding, you are definitely doing something wrong. When you set the bike up for bleeding, try and make the bleed ports the highest point on the caliper and the lever.

Watch this video:
http://www.pinkbike.com/news/tech-tuesday-bleeding-avid-brakes-2010.html

This is how to bleed Avid brakes, which work in the same way. The technique is a bit different to Magura, but it works soooooooo much better. The trick is to rely on producing a vacuum to get the air out, and really you need to do what John V said and clamp the tube between the syringe and the brake when you take the other one off, that's why the Avids have them. Obviously don't use DOT fluid, it's the technique you're after.
  Reply
#4
(04-27-2011, 10:51 AM)JohnV Wrote:  Never bled disk brakes on a bike before, only on my car and truck. However, if the issue is spilling oil from the syringe and oil wells on the bike, try putting a tube between the syringe and the oil well so you can crimp the tube and remove the syringe without loosing too much oil. Just an idea.

Aah, thanks very kindly for the advice mate! Fingers crossed for an uncomplicated resolution!!!
(04-27-2011, 03:11 PM)JonB Wrote:  Erm, I hate to break this to you but I think that's a new master cylinder/lever assembly needed there. However unless you've been a complete ham-fisted gorilla it shouldn't have broken like that, if they're still under warranty try and get them replaced.

As for bleeding, you are definitely doing something wrong. When you set the bike up for bleeding, try and make the bleed ports the highest point on the caliper and the lever.

Watch this video:
http://www.pinkbike.com/news/tech-tuesday-bleeding-avid-brakes-2010.html

This is how to bleed Avid brakes, which work in the same way. The technique is a bit different to Magura, but it works soooooooo much better. The trick is to rely on producing a vacuum to get the air out, and really you need to do what John V said and clamp the tube between the syringe and the brake when you take the other one off, that's why the Avids have them. Obviously don't use DOT fluid, it's the technique you're after.

Thanks an absolute bunch for all that solid advice mate. The video was most informative. Obviously a bit different to the Magura way as you said but very in- depth and some neat tips for thoroughness.In terms of my master cylinder, I guess I'll have to try to find a replacement, plus another bleed kit of course. One more question for you boss if ya don't mind....which are the best hydraulic disc brakes out there at the moment in your opinion? Cheers, Si
  Reply
#5
Quote:One more question for you boss if ya don't mind....which are the best hydraulic disc brakes out there at the moment in your opinion?

That's not an easy one, it depends what you're doing, and a bit of personal preference. There's no point for instance having a Shimano Saint (a brake you could use to stop tanks) on a bike that only goes on canal towpaths. I'll list what I'd recommend for different categories of riding:

Towpaths/commuting
Doesn't really matter, go for whichever you prefer that's not too expensive (I'd use an Avid Juicy 5 or similar, but I like my Avids)

XC/general trail riding
A Juicy 5 or Hayes 9 would do, but Hope M4s and Avid Elixers are what I'd prefer (perhaps a bit on the powerful side)

steep/hardcore trail riding/light downhill
Hope M4s (the new ones), Avid Elixers, Shimano SLX, Hayes Stroker (all with decent-sized rotors: 200 front 180/200 rear).

Full on Downhill:
Avid Codes, Shimano Saints, Hope V2s, Magura Gustavs?

I don't know much about Magura's range, I've only used them once. The lists are guidelines, personal preference and the availability of parts will dictate which to go for. For instance, Shimano and Hayes are very On/Off, you don't get much control over how much power you get. Avids and Hopes less so, but it depends on what you like. Shimano are impossible to get spares for (they don't make them), and Hope are the best for spares. The rest sit somewhere in between. This is the case in the UK, not sure about the States (you might not be able to get Hopes out there, they're made in the UK.)

Like I said, right brake for the right role. The brakes on a Boeing 747 are ridiculously powerful, but you wouldn't put them on a pickup truck would you?
  Reply
#6
(04-28-2011, 05:45 AM)JonB Wrote:  
Quote:One more question for you boss if ya don't mind....which are the best hydraulic disc brakes out there at the moment in your opinion?

That's not an easy one, it depends what you're doing, and a bit of personal preference. There's no point for instance having a Shimano Saint (a brake you could use to stop tanks) on a bike that only goes on canal towpaths. I'll list what I'd recommend for different categories of riding:

Towpaths/commuting
Doesn't really matter, go for whichever you prefer that's not too expensive (I'd use an Avid Juicy 5 or similar, but I like my Avids)

XC/general trail riding
A Juicy 5 or Hayes 9 would do, but Hope M4s and Avid Elixers are what I'd prefer (perhaps a bit on the powerful side)

steep/hardcore trail riding/light downhill
Hope M4s (the new ones), Avid Elixers, Shimano SLX, Hayes Stroker (all with decent-sized rotors: 200 front 180/200 rear).

Full on Downhill:
Avid Codes, Shimano Saints, Hope V2s, Magura Gustavs?

I don't know much about Magura's range, I've only used them once. The lists are guidelines, personal preference and the availability of parts will dictate which to go for. For instance, Shimano and Hayes are very On/Off, you don't get much control over how much power you get. Avids and Hopes less so, but it depends on what you like. Shimano are impossible to get spares for (they don't make them), and Hope are the best for spares. The rest sit somewhere in between. This is the case in the UK, not sure about the States (you might not be able to get Hopes out there, they're made in the UK.)

Like I said, right brake for the right role. The brakes on a Boeing 747 are ridiculously powerful, but you wouldn't put them on a pickup truck would you?

Ok buddy, that's some excellent insight you gave. I appreciate your thoroughness!

I've been looking around at brakes such as the M4s, Magura Marta SLs, Avid Elixirs (X0 & XX) and they all appeal to me if I'm honest. Only problem is having the money for such quality products!! I'm sure many of us are in the same boat though.

Many people would probably think I was stupid for buying a £999.99 (RRP£1200) bike without much knowledge about what makes it that price (ie.the parts). Now I feel a bit better about it though because if you make the effort to learn the DIY side of bike maintenance through websites such as this and how-to videos you can eventually build up the knowledge required to do it yourself, as I am steadily doing (although making mistakes along the way!).

Anyway, enough babbling on, apologies!

Just to let you know, I've e-mailed several Magura dealers in the UK to see if they can source me a right hand side Master Cylinder Assembly to replace my broke one. Fingers crossed on that. I've a feeling it's going to have to come direct from Magura in Germany though, so hopefully the total price won't end up being the same as a new brake system!

Again, thanks a lot for your help matey.

Si
  Reply
#7
(04-28-2011, 08:19 AM)Dalton2250 Wrote:  
(04-28-2011, 05:45 AM)JonB Wrote:  
Quote:One more question for you boss if ya don't mind....which are the best hydraulic disc brakes out there at the moment in your opinion?

That's not an easy one, it depends what you're doing, and a bit of personal preference. There's no point for instance having a Shimano Saint (a brake you could use to stop tanks) on a bike that only goes on canal towpaths. I'll list what I'd recommend for different categories of riding:

Towpaths/commuting
Doesn't really matter, go for whichever you prefer that's not too expensive (I'd use an Avid Juicy 5 or similar, but I like my Avids)

XC/general trail riding
A Juicy 5 or Hayes 9 would do, but Hope M4s and Avid Elixers are what I'd prefer (perhaps a bit on the powerful side)

steep/hardcore trail riding/light downhill
Hope M4s (the new ones), Avid Elixers, Shimano SLX, Hayes Stroker (all with decent-sized rotors: 200 front 180/200 rear).

Full on Downhill:
Avid Codes, Shimano Saints, Hope V2s, Magura Gustavs?

I don't know much about Magura's range, I've only used them once. The lists are guidelines, personal preference and the availability of parts will dictate which to go for. For instance, Shimano and Hayes are very On/Off, you don't get much control over how much power you get. Avids and Hopes less so, but it depends on what you like. Shimano are impossible to get spares for (they don't make them), and Hope are the best for spares. The rest sit somewhere in between. This is the case in the UK, not sure about the States (you might not be able to get Hopes out there, they're made in the UK.)

Like I said, right brake for the right role. The brakes on a Boeing 747 are ridiculously powerful, but you wouldn't put them on a pickup truck would you?

Ok buddy, that's some excellent insight you gave. I appreciate your thoroughness!

I've been looking around at brakes such as the M4s, Magura Marta SLs, Avid Elixirs (X0 & XX) and they all appeal to me if I'm honest. Only problem is having the money for such quality products!! I'm sure many of us are in the same boat though.

Many people would probably think I was stupid for buying a £999.99 (RRP£1200) bike without much knowledge about what makes it that price (ie.the parts). Now I feel a bit better about it though because if you make the effort to learn the DIY side of bike maintenance through websites such as this and how-to videos you can eventually build up the knowledge required to do it yourself, as I am steadily doing (although making mistakes along the way!).

Anyway, enough babbling on, apologies!

Just to let you know, I've e-mailed several Magura dealers in the UK to see if they can source me a right hand side Master Cylinder Assembly to replace my broke one. Fingers crossed on that. I've a feeling it's going to have to come direct from Magura in Germany though, so hopefully the total price won't end up being the same as a new brake system!

Again, thanks a lot for your help matey.

Si

Hi guys, just a quick update to say I found a place in the UK that sells the Magura Louise hinge clamp so I can fix my master cylinder back on the handlebars!!

Happy Days!!

Apart from it's cost me £25, for a tiny piece of brittle metal!!

Si
  Reply
#8
Welcome to the world of bike spares! Sad

When I dented the lowers on my 7-year old Rockshox Boxxers, they wanted £150 for a new set. I'd have struggled to sell the entire fork for half that!

Good to know that you're getting it sorted though, how did the bleed go?
  Reply


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