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Worst Cities for Cycling? And what helpful tips can you share to make it better?
#1
I live in a country that is dominated by cars, Motorcycles, Cars and Trucks. They all share a little hate for cyclists everywhere, there was one incident here where a cyclists was threatened by a guy in a motorcycle with a knife, good thing they rode in a group and the motorcycle rider was swarmed by the cyclists and threatened to sue him.

Personally, I havent encountered stuff like this but to be safe I always ride really early in the morning and late at night and use proper hand signals to communicate.

What's other cities are sh*t for cycling and what do you do to make it better?
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#2
Hello meamoantonio, someone in an SUV threatened me while I was riding home from work in Boston, USA. The driver's partner/wife tried to calm him, but he wouldn't. He and I had no interaction before this fight of words started. After he threatened I yelled at him saying I too pay taxes and I also had an equal right to be on that public road. ( I wasn't blocking him or his path, so not sure why he went on that rant). Interestingly, in the same town, another SUV driver threatened me while I was walking and using a crosswalk. My offense was I crossed the road, thus forcing him to yield to me.

I was scared to ride here in India, but so far I have had very cordial experiences. Due to a lack of proper shoulders, I do have to keep a safe distance and sometimes get off the paved road but things have been safe so far.

Riding in South America was heavenly from a road safety and respecting riders' life point-of-view.
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#3
The worst cities for cycling, are where people don't obey the road rules. One example is Manila. There is a very high chance of being involved in an accident.

Yet, if you are not going too far, a bicycle is the best form of transport. I remember catching a bus in Manila, and it would have been quicker to walk. There is so much traffic, it stops a lot of the time. A bicycle would be much quicker.

Cities where people do obey the road rules, are also dangerous. People drive so fast, when an accident does occur, it can be bad.
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#4
I see the problems between road users as merely symptomatic of wider problems in society.

To a certain extent, improved infrastructure and education of road users can improve things, but unless peoples' mentality changes overall, I think we'll always have these problems.

The Netherlands is famous for being cycling-friendly, right? I was talking to a 'serious' cyclist from the Netherlands who told me things are good in cities/towns, but on small country roads, he still has problems with 'frustrated' drivers. Huh
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#5
(10-23-2023, 08:47 AM)ichitan Wrote:  The worst cities for cycling, are where people don't obey the road rules. One example is Manila. There is a very high chance of being involved in an accident.

Yet, if you are not going too far, a bicycle is the best form of transport. I remember catching a bus in Manila, and it would have been quicker to walk. There is so much traffic, it stops a lot of the time. A bicycle would be much quicker.

Cities where people do obey the road rules, are also dangerous. People drive so fast, when an accident does occur, it can be bad.

I'm flabbergasted at the fact that we're both from the Philippines, I coudn't tell at all

(10-21-2023, 01:43 AM)GirishH Wrote:  Hello meamoantonio, someone in an SUV threatened me while I was riding home from work in Boston, USA. The driver's partner/wife tried to calm him, but he wouldn't. He and I had no interaction before this fight of words started. After he threatened I yelled at him saying I too pay taxes and I also had an equal right to be on that public road. ( I wasn't blocking him or his path, so not sure why he went on that rant). Interestingly, in the same town, another SUV driver threatened me while I was walking and using a crosswalk. My offense was I crossed the road, thus forcing him to yield to me.

I was scared to ride here in India, but so far I have had very cordial experiences. Due to a lack of proper shoulders, I do have to keep a safe distance and sometimes get off the paved road but things have been safe so far.

Riding in South America was heavenly from a road safety and respecting riders' life point-of-view.

I hear great stuff about South America too, what particular country was this?

(10-25-2023, 02:34 AM)enkei Wrote:  I see the problems between road users as merely symptomatic of wider problems in society.

To a certain extent, improved infrastructure and education of road users can improve things, but unless peoples' mentality changes overall, I think we'll always have these problems.

The Netherlands is famous for being cycling-friendly, right? I was talking to a 'serious' cyclist from the Netherlands who told me things are good in cities/towns, but on small country roads, he still has problems with 'frustrated' drivers. Huh

Im surprised, I guess this really is a global thing, some people really can't show some love for people riding on two wheels
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#6
(10-25-2023, 11:18 AM)meamoantonio Wrote:  I'm flabbergasted at the fact that we're both from the Philippines, I coudn't tell at all

I am not from the Philippines. I have visited there a couple of times.

I even had friends in Parañaque, and stayed there some of the time. I traveled to other places as well.

I like traveling. If you go to a place completely different from your home country, it is interesting.
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#7
I used to live in Jakarta, Indonesia for a few months - Bekasi, to be more specific. And I can't imagine biking and commuting there by bike on a daily basis. There were no cycling lanes or infrastructure at all, but it was back in 2013. Perhaps things have changed since. Nevertheless, riding a scooter was far more efficient because otherwise, you would have to cover long distances in between heavy traffic. Plus, you had to be aware of gutter drains and lack of covers on the side of the road.

Meanwhile, during my previous vacation in Malaysia this year, I was surprised by the amount of road cycling enthusiasts who took an early morning (I mean 6 am to 8 am) group ride just a bit outside of Kuala Lumpur. There was usually a mix of locals and foreigners (who apparently live in KL). It takes just a few minutes and you are outside the city. The roads there were great - plenty of short hills and exciting turns, plus the traffic was quite light in the early morning hours. I took a small group tour with these guys (https://www.airbnb.com/experiences/256121), great experience.

It's great that there are people who organize such rides just outside a huge metropolitan, showing that there are still options to ride your bike without being harassed by the traffic. @meamoantonio how is road cycling in the Philippines? I understand, you also do prefer early rides?

   
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#8
I’m from denver and they have bike lanes/path but 99% of the time you can’t use them cause there’s people parked there, they go for like 2 blocks and then disappear, so much broken glass in them that if you ride in the lane you just pop your tires, so you’re better off riding in the road. On my commuter I have tubeless tires with tubes and the patch liquid in them but I still get a flat every few weeks. Not the best but I doubt it’s the worst city for bikes
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#9
(10-25-2023, 01:24 PM)ichitan Wrote:  
(10-25-2023, 11:18 AM)meamoantonio Wrote:  I'm flabbergasted at the fact that we're both from the Philippines, I coudn't tell at all

I am not from the Philippines. I have visited there a couple of times.

I even had friends in Parañaque, and stayed there some of the time. I traveled to other places as well.

I like traveling. If you go to a place completely different from your home country, it is interesting.

awesome stuff! next time you're here do let me know I'd love to show you around the nice bike destinations here.

Traveling is indeed great, it really broadens your world view! what countries did you find welcoming for cyclists?

(10-25-2023, 04:12 PM)Zviedrs Wrote:  I used to live in Jakarta, Indonesia for a few months - Bekasi, to be more specific. And I can't imagine biking and commuting there by bike on a daily basis. There were no cycling lanes or infrastructure at all, but it was back in 2013. Perhaps things have changed since. Nevertheless, riding a scooter was far more efficient because otherwise, you would have to cover long distances in between heavy traffic. Plus, you had to be aware of gutter drains and lack of covers on the side of the road.

Meanwhile, during my previous vacation in Malaysia this year, I was surprised by the amount of road cycling enthusiasts who took an early morning (I mean 6 am to 8 am) group ride just a bit outside of Kuala Lumpur. There was usually a mix of locals and foreigners (who apparently live in KL). It takes just a few minutes and you are outside the city. The roads there were great - plenty of short hills and exciting turns, plus the traffic was quite light in the early morning hours. I took a small group tour with these guys (https://www.airbnb.com/experiences/256121), great experience.

It's great that there are people who organize such rides just outside a huge metropolitan, showing that there are still options to ride your bike without being harassed by the traffic. @meamoantonio how is road cycling in the Philippines? I understand, you also do prefer early rides?

Cycling in Manila is pretty much the same as in KL, no infrastructure at all for cycling but it is getting better but since we're so close to mountains and provinces, a short 30min bike ride will let you enter Rizal, Cavite and other provinces that are great for cycling. We got a good mix of flats, hills, mountains just outside the city. I hear a lot of good stuff from Malaysia though that are way better than here, I heard there was a hotel that was specifically designed for road cyclists and it's at the center of all the great routes the locals take.
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#10
I started on another bikepacking trip and the first two days were completely on the freeways/highways of India. Great and clean breakdown lanes to ride on. I made great mileage but a few authentic interactions and not great scenery. Pretty safe to ride as well compared to lane-less back roads. Riding early would have helped a lot as this winter has been unusually hot (like summer).

Starting on 3rd day, I took back roads, and it has been beautiful. Lots of authentic interactions with people treating me to coffee/tea/buttermilk/almond milk. One teacher even took me to his home for lunch. I got to enjoy tender coconut from a farm and such. Again these back roads don't have any lanes, so you have to be alert all the time but the scenery and return on investment is worth it, I think.

Before this trip, I thought India was dangerous place to ride on..but my experience has been very different. I am seeing a lot of group riders and long distance riders. That being awareness and curiosity.

It can still be a dangerous place as I have been warned that north India is very different and very unsafe over South. I will report once I ride there but then again I rode in Colombia soi feel like as long as I take all the precautions, I should be fine.

50 shades of grain, I saw while on a country road yesterday..:-)


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#11
The best place for commuting I’ve ever ridden is Breckinridge/keystone Colorado (summit county in general). They have awesome bike paths everywhere, free buses with bike racks if you’re going from one city to another and the paths are maintained really well I think that’s what put them above. as some cities will have a bike path here or there but they don’t really do much for you other then go for like 10 blocks then disappear. So maybe having bike path planning/bike lane planning done by a engineer or something definitely helps
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#12
I rode for some 2 months in Colombia and 7 in Ecuador. Both were heavenly and heard same about rest of the countries where my biking buddy continued to ride while I am decided to stay back in Ecuador for a a bit long. South Americans are extra kind to cyclists because most of them ( Taxi, truck drivers, common- and rich-man and most others) are cyclists..

https://www.cycleblaze.com/journals/mistergordo/cultura-de-ciclismo/

Currently, I am riding in India and it's been similarly good as well.

https://www.cycleblaze.com/journals/mistergordoindia/day-14-ranebennur-to-shivamogga/


(10-25-2023, 11:18 AM)meamoantonio Wrote:  
(10-23-2023, 08:47 AM)ichitan Wrote:  The worst cities for cycling, are where people don't obey the road rules. One example is Manila. There is a very high chance of being involved in an accident.

Yet, if you are not going too far, a bicycle is the best form of transport. I remember catching a bus in Manila, and it would have been quicker to walk. There is so much traffic, it stops a lot of the time. A bicycle would be much quicker.

Cities where people do obey the road rules, are also dangerous. People drive so fast, when an accident does occur, it can be bad.

I'm flabbergasted at the fact that we're both from the Philippines, I coudn't tell at all

(10-21-2023, 01:43 AM)GirishH Wrote:  Hello meamoantonio, someone in an SUV threatened me while I was riding home from work in Boston, USA. The driver's partner/wife tried to calm him, but he wouldn't. He and I had no interaction before this fight of words started. After he threatened I yelled at him saying I too pay taxes and I also had an equal right to be on that public road. ( I wasn't blocking him or his path, so not sure why he went on that rant). Interestingly, in the same town, another SUV driver threatened me while I was walking and using a crosswalk. My offense was I crossed the road, thus forcing him to yield to me.

I was scared to ride here in India, but so far I have had very cordial experiences. Due to a lack of proper shoulders, I do have to keep a safe distance and sometimes get off the paved road but things have been safe so far.

Riding in South America was heavenly from a road safety and respecting riders' life point-of-view.

I hear great stuff about South America too, what particular country was this?

(10-25-2023, 02:34 AM)enkei Wrote:  I see the problems between road users as merely symptomatic of wider problems in society.

To a certain extent, improved infrastructure and education of road users can improve things, but unless peoples' mentality changes overall, I think we'll always have these problems.

The Netherlands is famous for being cycling-friendly, right? I was talking to a 'serious' cyclist from the Netherlands who told me things are good in cities/towns, but on small country roads, he still has problems with 'frustrated' drivers. Huh

Im surprised, I guess this really is a global thing, some people really can't show some love for people riding on two wheels
  Reply
#13
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P26VY7EjAlg&ab_channel=KRQE

Reminds me of this Sad
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